Ripping questions

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by piltupso, Apr 19, 2007.

  1. piltupso macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2006
    #1
    I am new to ripping DVD's. I have read a lot about ripping speeds and fps. I am trying to find a baseline as what could be considered "good" speed and how do I check fps anyway. I am using Mac The Ripper 3.0 on a Mac Pro 2.66 with 1 GB ram. To rip a DVD using main feature extraction takes about 30 min and I have no idea of the fps as I don't know how to check this yet. Is this a "good" speed and is there anything I can do to speed this up?
     
  2. epochblue macrumors 68000

    epochblue

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    Aug 12, 2005
    Location:
    Nashville, TN
    #2
    If anyone is talking to you about FPS, they're either talking about a game or their talking about Handbrake. As far as I know, the way MTR rips DVDs, it doesn't ever report or even keep FPS data.

    30 minutes per DVD might be a little high, but perhaps your ripping big movies....or perhaps 3.0 takes longer than 2.6.6. 30 minutes is certainly not "bad," though.
     
  3. slooksterPSV macrumors 68030

    slooksterPSV

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    Apr 17, 2004
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    Nowheresville
    #3
    Actually when ripping DVD's some will give you a FPS count, because you are ripping frames like if you use Handbrake, it will report it to you in FPS; FPS isn't for games, sorry, it is for things that use Frames, and handles Frames as well. If it takes you 30 min to rip a DVD, dang that's fast, it takes me almost 6 hours to rip 1 dvd on my iBook with Handbrake with Fans running at full blast most of the time while ripping (cpu gets hot lol).

    EDIT: Re-read your post, and you did mention about handbrake, there is another piece of software which will average the FPS and let you know after the rip.
     
  4. clevin macrumors G3

    clevin

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2006
    #4
    I think his "30 minutes" only refers to the process of copying DVD onto harddrive in the format of *.VOB. subsequent compression process normally takes much longer time, especially if H.264 is the target codec, 3~6 hours is very reasonable.
     
  5. piltupso thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2006
    #5
    Yes I am talking about just copying to the hard drive in 30 min to view later with idvd I am not to a point of changing formats or compressing to burn back to DVD or send to another device. So is 30 min for this activity still in an avg range? I have been watching activity monitor off and on during the procedure and I have even got close to my resources, so I am not sure how I could speed up this step. I may play with handbrake for a speed comparison, what may be a good time to rip to another format?
     
  6. clevin macrumors G3

    clevin

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    Aug 6, 2006
    #6
    it varies depends on how large the file is, 30 minutes is a very reasonable number.
     
  7. NJuul macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Location:
    Boston
    #7
    When you rip a DVD to your harddrive without simultaneously compressing the files (ie, are just copying the disk), the bottleneck is the speed of your DVD drive. If you want to increase the speed of the process by anything but a mere couple of minutes, you are going to have to buy a faster drive.
     
  8. epochblue macrumors 68000

    epochblue

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    Aug 12, 2005
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    #8
    This is horribly off-topic, but the phrase "FPS" does have relevance to games. FPS == "First Person Shooter" and the higher your frames per second (FPS) on a networked game (WoW, for example), the smoother the game runs. You try playing a game like WoW at 12 FPS and tell me if FPS doesn't have relevance to games ;)
     
  9. Jim Campbell macrumors 6502a

    Jim Campbell

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2006
    Location:
    A World of my Own; UK
    #9
    Forgive my ingnorance ... long time Mac user, but all this video stuff is new to me, so:

    Is there any intrinsic benefit to using H.264 other than smaller file sizes? I'm not really interested in viewing video on an iPod (and I earn enough to be abe to buy more storage as and when I need it:) ). Currently, I'm just ripping/converting video in straight MPEG-4, which is a substantially faster process than using H.264 and I was wondering whether there was any other reason for using H.264 apart from conserving disk space.

    Cheers!

    Jim
     
  10. clevin macrumors G3

    clevin

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2006
    #10
    1. the target file size is NOT related to codec (H.264 is a codec), rather, they are directly calculated from the bitrate. so, for example, if u want to compress a video, you can choose different codecs (H.264, Xvid, DivX, etc), as long as you are using same bitrate, they will give you same file size.

    2. however, at same bitrate, H.264 gives you better graphic quality. Downside is that H.264 coding process is 2~3 times longer than Xvid/DivX.

    3. MPEG-4 is a standard, a big boat, is NOT a codec. Xvid/DivX/H.264 are all using some part of MPEG-4 standard.

    4. AFAIK, most transcoding apps under OSX are using H.264. (not all of them, FFmpegx gives you more flexibility.)
     
  11. slooksterPSV macrumors 68030

    slooksterPSV

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    Apr 17, 2004
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    Nowheresville
    #11
    Oops I forgot just lol, you know what I meant lol.
     
  12. biggiesmalls macrumors newbie

    biggiesmalls

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2006
    Location:
    New York
    #12
    I am new to Mac's as well as DVD Ripping..what is the advantage of converting to H.264 as opposed to just storing it on your hard-drive as whatever MacTheRipper rips it into?
     

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