rMBP (Mid-2012) %82 Health @534 Cycle

Kuray

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jul 24, 2010
134
0
Hi,

I bough my rMBP at 12 August 2012. I bought it with AppleCare so my warranty ends in 12 August 2015.

Info from Apple's System Information
Cycle Count: 534
Condition: Normal
Info from CoconutBattery
Cycle Count: 534
Health: %81.9

As for as I know, it is OK for %80 up to 1000 cycles. Mine is half of it but it is at about %82

I picked up my rMBP just a days ago from Apple. The main issue was different but I said them I have battery health problem too.

After picking up they said that they checked up from their own special Test Programs and battery is OK and does not require any replacement.

The health will drop definitely before 1000 cycle. If it is %82 in 534 cycle, imagine what will it be like in 3-4 months.

Should Apple replace my battery or not?
 

Jozone

macrumors 6502
Jul 24, 2007
319
70
If Apple sees the health as okay and it isnt below 80% prior to warranty end, the battery remains.
 
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Samuelsan2001

macrumors 604
Oct 24, 2013
7,682
2,103
If Apple sees the health as okay and it isnt below 80% prior to warranty end, the battery remains.
This is the crux of the matter. The warranty is for 1000 cycles or the 3 year warranty, ie once the warranty is up the cycle count means nothing it is just a consumable item past it's date at that point and they'll charge you.
 

Kuray

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jul 24, 2010
134
0
This is the crux of the matter. The warranty is for 1000 cycles or the 3 year warranty, ie once the warranty is up the cycle count means nothing it is just a consumable item past it's date at that point and they'll charge you.
So if 3 years pass and after 1 month of warrant end date, the battery drops %78 and Apple won't care about it.
 

Jozone

macrumors 6502
Jul 24, 2007
319
70
So if 3 years pass and after 1 month of warrant end date, the battery drops %78 and Apple won't care about it.
Technically, yes this is correct. Your mileage may vary if an Apple tech will feel bad for you - but my sense is unless it was something significant under 80% with your cycle count (say <70%) it would not be swapped even as a courtesy out of warranty.

Apple is warrantying that the battery will last with at least 80% of its health for the first 3 years, or 1000 cycles.
 

Kuray

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jul 24, 2010
134
0
Technically, yes this is correct. Your mileage may vary if an Apple tech will feel bad for you - but my sense is unless it was something significant under 80% with your cycle count (say <70%) it would not be swapped even as a courtesy out of warranty.

Apple is warrantying that the battery will last with at least 80% of its health for the first 3 years, or 1000 cycles.
They should make something out for customer satisfy.
 

Gav2k

macrumors G3
Jul 24, 2009
9,218
1,584
Apple don't charge a massive amount given most machines are case exchange as part of the process.
 

Jozone

macrumors 6502
Jul 24, 2007
319
70
Apple don't charge a massive amount given most machines are case exchange as part of the process.
Exactly - if the battery every really becomes a problem you're looking at ~$200 for a new topcase and battery? Sounds reasonable to me.
 

Beau10

macrumors 6502a
Apr 6, 2008
720
101
Downtown San Diego
Apple is warrantying that the battery will last with at least 80% of its health for the first 3 years, or 1000 cycles.
Back in 2k10 or so I had a 2008 MBP (the old body style). Back then I believe it was 80% within 300 cycles (1 year default, 3 years w/ AppleCare which I had). I was down to something like 72% at 250 cycles, the machine was less than 3 years old, so to me technically it warranted a replacement.

I was surprised to find myself getting pushback from support - they said this wasn't a hard and set rule but more of a guideline and that if there wasn't obvious defect Apple's stance was that my usage could have been an issue. Called another support person and got the same. Hopefully Apple is better on this but don't be surprised if you can't get a replacement once it dips below 80%.
 

Jozone

macrumors 6502
Jul 24, 2007
319
70
Back in 2k10 or so I had a 2008 MBP (the old body style). Back then I believe it was 80% within 300 cycles (1 year default, 3 years w/ AppleCare which I had). I was down to something like 72% at 250 cycles, the machine was less than 3 years old, so to me technically it warranted a replacement.

I was surprised to find myself getting pushback from support - they said this wasn't a hard and set rule but more of a guideline and that if there wasn't obvious defect Apple's stance was that my usage could have been an issue. Called another support person and got the same. Hopefully Apple is better on this but don't be surprised if you can't get a replacement once it dips below 80%.
I think the difference is now that there is a diagnostic that throws a "bad/failed" battery warning that would allow a repair to be covered by warranty.
 

Beau10

macrumors 6502a
Apr 6, 2008
720
101
Downtown San Diego
I think the difference is now that there is a diagnostic that throws a "bad/failed" battery warning that would allow a repair to be covered by warranty.
The OS battery condition was showing "needs replacement". Support put forth the argument that usage scenarios can affect battery health and that there was no hard and fast rule on what constituted a replacement.

The warranty language remains wiggly, IMO giving support room to deny claims after asking some basic usage questions if they wish:

"Your battery is designed to retain up to 80% of its original capacity at 1000 complete charge cycles. The one-year warranty includes replacement coverage for a defective battery."

Instead of something to the effect of "Your battery is warrantied to retain at least 80%..." Apple may be different on this now, and/or this largely could come down to who you talk to.
 
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Jozone

macrumors 6502
Jul 24, 2007
319
70
The OS battery condition was showing "needs replacement". Support put forth the argument that usage scenarios can affect battery health and that there was no hard and fast rule on what constituted a replacement.

The warranty language remains wiggly, IMO giving support room to deny claims after asking some basic usage questions if they wish:

"Your battery is designed to retain up to 80% of its original capacity at 1000 complete charge cycles. The one-year warranty includes replacement coverage for a defective battery."

Instead of something to the effect of "Your battery is warrantied to retain at least 80%..." Apple may be different on this now, and/or this largely could come down to who you talk to.
Really good to know - so at this point they leave this level of ambiguity for all device battery replacements?
 

Kuray

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jul 24, 2010
134
0
If it drops below 80% before your applecare is up then yes if it doesn't then no.
Genius said that they use their own software to check for it. I use coconutBattery therefore they won't accept my percentage BTW