Root user?

Discussion in 'macOS Mojave (10.14)' started by Dopeyman, Sep 30, 2018.

  1. Dopeyman macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles!
    #1
    I'm trying to add myself as a user so that I'm able to make changes without having to enter the password each and every time. And basically remove that lil icon on the bottom left of each window.

    Help?

    Running Mojave on a 2012 Mini i7
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Dopeyman thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles!
  3. maverick808 macrumors 65816

    maverick808

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2004
    Location:
    Scotland
    #3
    It looks like you are trying to do this at the top-level of your drive. You realize that if you do this then you're disabling all security for your drive? You aren't supposed be able to easily write outside your home directory as then any process at all could read/write whatever it wants.

    If it's a throwaway install then if you really want to do it then just disable System Integrity Protection by rebooting into recovery mode and running `csrutil disable` in a terminal. Then restart, open Terminal, and chmod the entire drive to have read/write access with `sudo chmod -R 777 /`.

    Again, I completely do not recommend doing this as it's utterly stupid unless this is a VM or throwaway machine that you are just fooling around with.
     
  4. Dopeyman thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2005
    Location:
    Los Angeles!
    #4
    It worked. Thank you.

    And yes, it's my main drive that I'm doing this to. I'm the only one that uses this computer, so I know which processes I do and what apps I install.

    Thanks again!!
     
  5. dsjr2006 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
    Location:
    Metro Detroit
    #5
    Being the only one using the computer and knowing what apps are installed are not an excuse to run with root access. You've disabled the security established for decades. A bug or flaw could easily delete files or directories that normally wouldn't be affected. You can already access any file on the drive by using terminal and using 'sudo' which temporarily elevates your permission, but with a password. This also means that were someone able to obtain access to your system they have complete control without having to authenticate before altering sensitive files.
     
  6. crjackson2134 macrumors 601

    crjackson2134

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2013
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    #6
    True, I would discourage this, but if that's what the man wants, it's his machine. It could be a valuable learning experience at the very least.
     

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5 September 30, 2018