Router for touch

Discussion in 'iPod touch Accessories' started by kwk1, Nov 12, 2008.

  1. kwk1 macrumors regular

    kwk1

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2008
    Location:
    Canada
    #1
    Is there any point in getting an 'N' router for the touch?

    Or would the g/b ones work just as well?

    I'm thinking an 'N' router would only be beneficial if you had a laptop?

    Thanks for answering my dumb questions.:)
     
  2. goosnarrggh macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    May 16, 2006
    #2
    The iPod Touch only supports 802.11b and 802.11g wireless. There'd be no benefit in an "N" router if it's only being bought for the iPod.

    If you're planning to eventually use other wifi devices such as laptops, then a "N" router might come in handy in the future. However, when even a single "G" or earlier device coexists with "N" devices, the overall throughput for all devices on the network will degrade somwehat.
     
  3. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #3
    Right... I think cost is the major driver. It seems like there are numerous cheap 802.11n routers out now -- like $30-50. You can get an 802.11g router for $20-25 if you shop around, but that's really a minimal savings. Definitely do not spend much more than $30 for an 802.11g router, unless perhaps it's a really nice one (like a used 802.11g AEBS).
     
  4. kwk1 thread starter macrumors regular

    kwk1

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2008
    Location:
    Canada
    #4
    Hey, thanks for thr replies.:)

    Do you mean, when a G and N device are used at the same time, it will degrade the speed?

    Thanks
     
  5. mikes63737 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2005
    #5
    Yes. The slowest device sets the speed of the network.

    The G device will be its normal speed but the N device will drop to G speeds.
     
  6. kwk1 thread starter macrumors regular

    kwk1

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2008
    Location:
    Canada
    #6
    That explains it perfectly!

    Thanks for all the replies.;)
     
  7. goosnarrggh macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    May 16, 2006
    #7
    Some routers (usually "hybrid" or "simultaneous dual band") allow you to create two distinct access points, typically one at 2.4 GHz (compatible with 802.11b/g/n devices) and the other at 5 GHz (compatible with 802.11a/n devices).

    If you don't use any "A" devices (they're fairly uncommon in North America), and you instruct your "N" devices to only attempt to make use of the 5 GHz access point, then any "B" and "G" devices which may occupy the 2.4 GHz access point will be out of the way, and the N devices would be able to reach their full potential speed.
     

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