Run OS X in a VM inside of OS X??

Discussion in 'macOS' started by atomize22, Jun 25, 2007.

  1. atomize22 macrumors newbie

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    Sep 14, 2006
    #1
    Basically what I want to do is create a OS X test environment that I can access within my production install of OS X. I want to install a second copy of OS X in a VM or something like that in order to test software. Seems Parallels and VMWare Fusion do not allow the creation of an OS X VM, what is the best way to go about that?
     
  2. volvoben macrumors 6502

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    #2
    I could be wrong, but I think Apple's EULA specifically prohibits running OS X virtually.
     
  3. aaronw1986 macrumors 68030

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    Oct 31, 2006
    #3
    I believe you are right.
     
  4. one1 macrumors 65816

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    #4
    Don't you love it when you pay someone 3 grand for something and they tell you how you are going to use it.....
     
  5. Nermal Moderator

    Nermal

    Staff Member

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    #5
    I read it (admittedly with a rather large-toothed comb) and didn't see anything. If any of you know otherwise, please quote the respective bits :)
     
  6. aaronw1986 macrumors 68030

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    #6
    I hope u didn't pay 3 grand for Tiger, ;)
     
  7. volvoben macrumors 6502

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    #7
    I'm not about to pour through the eula, but here's a quote about it:

    "Parallels Marketing Manager Ben Rudolph made it plain that "due to the EULA in OS X that forbids virtualization, Parallels will not be enabling users to virtualize OS X anytime soon," according to an Ars Technica story."

    So essentially parallels/vmware etc will not help you virtualize osx as they do with XP or Linux etc, but I have no idea if there are built in features to keep you from installing it without their helpful shortcuts. You would think that if you bought another copy of os x you could legally install it on your mac a second time, but it's not legal at this time.

    I suppose this is all obviously because windows/'nix folks would be much more likely to virtualize os x and have a quick and dirty way to have an apple machine on any hardware.
     
  8. OutThere macrumors 603

    OutThere

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    #8
    My friends and I have tested new versions of OS X on new partitions that we made along side the old version...I know it isn't virtualization, but it'll protect your main system from damage that a new system could create, if you're testing stuff.
     
  9. MacsRgr8 macrumors 604

    MacsRgr8

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    #9
    But if you look hard enough you will find a copy of Tiger that will run on "generic PC" hardware anyway, so why this extra caution..?

    Whatever it is illegal to install Mac OS X on something that is NOT a Mac.

    I find it surprising that it hasn't been achieved yet, though. I think both Parallels and Fusion have made their software completely incompatible with a virtualised version of Mac OS X, or is that Apple have made Mac OS X absolutely impossible to virtulalise....? I think this even extends to Darwin for x86.
     
  10. OldSkoolNJ macrumors 6502

    OldSkoolNJ

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    Jul 10, 2006
    #10
    NO, actually they sell you a machine and software that already has said agreements and you agree to them and then you spent $3000 on it. By purchasing you agree to those terms.

    Not throwing stones or trying to start anything but this is exactly the way it works.

    :apple: Kevin
     
  11. Jessy macrumors regular

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    #11
    No, that's the legal mumbo-jumbo of it. What the human beings in here do is pay a ton of money to get a computer than runs the most useful OS out there because we don't have the ability to create our own superior one in the current state of civilization. Actual happenings do not work on this level. Such an understanding is unnecessary to take part in the Apple experience.

    As an example of a disregard for what you mentioned, I never, ever read the license agreements that come up when installing software, and I doubt many others do.

    On a side note, a guy I work with runs OS X on his PC without problems.
     
  12. kolax macrumors G3

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    Mar 20, 2007
    #12
    I'm sure if you are a developer you should get in touch with Apple and ask them what you can do.

    There'll be a solution somewhere.
     
  13. Thinine macrumors newbie

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    Jul 23, 2002
    #13
    OS X has kernel level VM capability (Classic is an example) so I'm sure this is possible. It would just take quite a while to do.
     
  14. one1 macrumors 65816

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    #14
    Once I put my hard earned 3 grand down and I own it no one is gonna tell me how to use it. :) Fortunately I have never needed to do anything except just "use" it as normal, but if the day comes....... :cool:

    When they start giving them away free, I'll do whatever THEY want me to with it.
     
  15. moonislune macrumors regular

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    Sep 11, 2005
    #15
    Soon, Apple is going to find themselves in some heat for that part of the EULA. So will MS with their silly Vista Premium VM requirements. Seriously.. imagine Ford, Toyota, etc. telling you both how to drive your car and where you can drive it!

    Supposedly, the Insanelymac site has instructions on how to do this in vmware, but by running OSX in VMWare, you lose compatibility as some programs won't recognize the required hardware and on top of that its fairly slow and you violate the EULA. At least, compared to the Windows world, we can always install an OSX test partition on a Firewire drive (which is what I do now).
     
  16. kolax macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2007
    #16
    Apple don't say "you cannot use our Mac's for games" or "you cannot install Windows on a Mac otherwise you'd break our EULA"

    That would be telling you what to do.

    Apple simply don't want people to clone their OS, which is fair enough. You don't buy a Mac to clone it within a VM.

    Well I certainly didn't.
     
  17. moonislune macrumors regular

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    Sep 11, 2005
    #17
    Sorry, I don't think the argument holds. You should be able to buy a Mac and run any piece of software you want. Period. OSX is software, not hardware. If I bought a Mac (and I have bought many), I have a right to run OSX on that machine per the EULA. If I buy another copy of OSX, I should also be able to run that on my Mac (in a virtual machine). That's it. It's that simple. The only reason we developers and programmers can't do this right now has to do with TPM as it is not implemented in a virtual machine. Apple needs to work with Parallels and VMWARE to develop a highly encrypted "soft" TPM key to allow us to do this.

    And trust me... this is WORTH it. Windows and Linux have been doing this for years!
     
  18. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    Jan 9, 2004
    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #18
    It's not super clear that the EULA virtualization prevents you from running OS X on Apple hardware in virtualization, as long as you own all the appropriate licenses. There was a project working on this, but it seems to have died out....

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac-on-Mac

    It never made it past Panther.
     
  19. moonislune macrumors regular

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    Sep 11, 2005
    #19
    What a great find! Apparently, they released a bugfix update on 06-25-07. I wonder how it actually ran?

    http://mac-on-linux.sourceforge.net/news.php
     
  20. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    Location:
    Grand Rapids, MI, USA
    #20
    I don't know... the Mac version never ran on top of Tiger, and I was not aware of it until after I had upgraded to Tiger, so I never really had much of a chance to try it out. If it could have run Panther virtually on top of Tiger, I would've almost certainly have used it a couple of years ago when Tiger and SPSS weren't getting along.
     

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