Running 1T as a startup disk

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by tarsierspectral, Aug 27, 2010.

  1. tarsierspectral macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2010
    #1
    I have 2 HDs one is Black Caviar 640GB and the other one is the stock 1T that comes with MP hex. I was intending to make the 640GB my start up but will have to go through the hassle of moving the data 2x and reinstalling the OS. Any disadvantage of keeping the 1T as my boot drive?

    Thanks
     
  2. iMikeT macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2006
    Location:
    California
    #2
    I don't think you will experience any disadvantages per se by keeping the stock HD the as your boot drive other than wasting the space if you do not intend to use it. Personally I like to keep the physical memory of the boot disk as low as possible as I like to separate my data from the boot drive.

    If I were you I would invest the time in installing OS X on the smaller of the two drives that you have and transfer your data to it then use the stock drive for something else. Seriously, how long can that possibly take you on a Mac Pro, a couple of hours tops?
     
  3. Honumaui macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    #3
    I would take that one that comes with it and partition it into two
    top one 350 and bottom 650

    then put the OS on the top 350 and use the bottom to bu your other 640 that would hold your normal working files

    a small price in time to pay for safety in the long run ?

    I would also say get a 2TB drive stick it in bay 3 and run it as Time Machine

    but as mentioned just waste some space ? but then I would ask what is your bu system ? if you do this
     
  4. bzollinger macrumors 6502a

    bzollinger

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2005
    #4
    I'd run it on the 1TB drive, like it comes.

    • no messing around with reinstall
    • maintaining a higher amount of free space on the disk makes it faster
    • the 1TB drive might actually be faster because of the higher density (storage review or toms hardware could confirm)
    • use the 640GB as scratch or home files/media
     
  5. Demigod Mac macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2008
    #5
    You can use Disk Utility to do a Restore. That'll basically clone one hard drive into another. Bootable, too.
     
  6. tarsierspectral thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2010
    #6
    I don't want to clone it. I want a clean install
     
  7. tarsierspectral thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2010
    #7
    Why would I be wasting the space. I can still store files on the boot drive, no?
     
  8. Honumaui macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    #8
    yup just dont go over half full total ?

    I think many people like to keep a lean boot cause we feel it performs better and or other reasons ?

    the more you fill up a HDD as I am sure yo know the faster it is ? so if you can keep a lean boot on a HDD and say only fill %10 the slow down will be minimal

    OS X with journaling does a pretty good job of keeping things neat in the file system so that small 20-30 or so gigs for your file system stay way to the outside of your HDD


    if you have everything on ONE larger as you use it ad more programs etc.. and lets say you use up %50 of the HDD now some of your programs etc.... are in the half way down part of the HDD meaning half way down % wise not physical but this may cause it to be a bit slower at times ? the other thing is pulling files off your boot as you are using programs is not as efficient in some cases ?

    again theory and reality ? its hard to say for sure

    so going with the partition you gain a for sure advantage (at least I think so and sure some others might agree)

    also you need a backup so that extra space does not go to waste ?

    check out this link
    http://macperformanceguide.com/Storage-WhyYouNeedMoreThanYouNeed.html
     
  9. tarsierspectral thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2010
    #9
    Thanks Honumaui. I think I will partition my bigger drive.
     

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