running Mac OS in a non-Apple computer

aroldanf

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Feb 27, 2017
3
0
I have a Mac Mini 2014.
Given that the new version of Mac Mini is significantly more expensive, could I purchase a non-apple computer and install Mac OS to replace my outdated Mac Mini 2014?
 

aroldanf

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Feb 27, 2017
3
0
Thank you
Yes, just go to tonymacx86.com for info
It seems that the web address that you mentioned in your posting (tonymacx86.com) sales the components to build a MacOS computer, which requires technical skills beyond my knowledge/know how. Do you know of out of the box systems that can run Mojave that require no assembling?
 

hallux

macrumors 68030
Apr 25, 2012
2,774
485
You should also be aware that while it CAN be done, it technically violates the macOS EULA which says it is only to be run on Apple-branded hardware.
 

AmazingRobie

macrumors 6502
Jun 10, 2009
288
150
Thank you

It seems that the web address that you mentioned in your posting (tonymacx86.com) sales the components to build a MacOS computer, which requires technical skills beyond my knowledge/know how. Do you know of out of the box systems that can run Mojave that require no assembling?
If you find out how, please message me and let me know. I've been searching for ages and have never found a viable turnkey solution. I just bought a 2010 Mac Pro from ipowerresale.com and called it a day.
 

RedTomato

macrumors 601
Mar 4, 2005
4,011
312
.. London ..
It's a breach of Apple's terms and conditions to run Mac OS on non-Apple hardware. You won't be arrested for it, Apple just won't support you. However Apple will understandably go after people who sell hackintoshes, and has done so in the past.

You're free to enter 'hackintosh' into Google, there are several other sites that discuss it, not just tonymacX86.com but we can't discuss the technical aspects of building hackingtoshes here, it seems to be against MacRumors rules.

You should also know that it's also against MacRumors rules to discuss running Mac OS in a Virtual Machine in VMWare on a Windows PC / laptop, even if that might meet your needs better. Setting that up is rather technical, but google for online guides.
 

velocityg4

macrumors 601
Dec 19, 2004
4,598
1,184
Georgia
Thank you

It seems that the web address that you mentioned in your posting (tonymacx86.com) sales the components to build a MacOS computer, which requires technical skills beyond my knowledge/know how. Do you know of out of the box systems that can run Mojave that require no assembling?
There won't be any solution which simply just works. As far as technical skills are concerned. Getting OS X working on a non Apple computer is far more advanced than plugging some parts in.

There are children's Lego sets which are far more challenging to assemble than a computer. Pretty much everything is a case of if it fits it is in the right place. The motherboard manual is also clearly labeled. If you don't want to take the risk. You can likely find someone to come to your house and assemble it for $100. Although any reputable tech will refuse to install OS X on non-Apple hardware. They can have it all plugged in for you and have it booted into Linux to verify it works. After that it would be up to you to read and figure out how to get OS X running.
 

Beachguy

macrumors 65816
Nov 23, 2011
1,007
402
Florida, USA
I will also offer an additional site for good info, which has helped me in the past get OS X and macOS running on non-Apple computers. OSX86PROJECT.ORG has some useful info for getting it running on existing machines, with compatibility lists, etc. Not recommending the concept of this (all my machines are Apple hardware) but providing information only.
 

mkelly

macrumors regular
Nov 29, 2007
159
78
As others have stated, you can absolutely do it. However, your experience running macOS on a Hackintosh will not be nearly as smooth as running macOS on Apple hardware. If you are not technically savvy, or willing to put in the effort to learn, then you're much better off saving up for a proper Mac (have you looked at Apple's refurb site by the way?)

Issues you will encounter when building and running a Hackintosh PC:

* Limited hardware compatibility, especially if you're looking at running it on a laptop (eg: won't support many laptop's built-in WiFi, so you'll either end up having to replace the laptop's WiFi adapter or use a USB adapter)
* macOS updates will often break your Hackintosh, requiring you to apply patches and fixes after each update.
* Problems with Messages, FaceTime and several other apps due to your machine not having an Apple hardware serial number and UUID (there are workarounds for this, but they involve spoofing serial numbers).
* No guarantee it will work with future macOS updates (which is what you've run into with your Mac mini anyhow).

Note: for the Hackintosh fans out there, I'm *not* saying that Hackintoshes are bad per se. I've built a few in the past. But they're not for everyone. If you don't enjoy getting your hands dirty with a build and debugging software/driver issues, then a Hackintosh isn't for you. In my case, I had fun with my builds, but in the end I looked at the time I spent, multiplied that by my usual hourly rate, and realized that I wasn't saving any money over a real Mac. But for the experience/fun of it? Totally worth it.

(Also: you'll be hard-pressed to find a legitimate company who will build you a Hackintosh - they'd be a target for Apple's legal dept. But you may find an individual willing to help you "on the side").

Highly recommend that you have a look at Apple's refurb site and see what you can find there... if you can hold off you will see new Mac Minis showing up there within 3-5 months I'd think.
 
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bigfatipod

macrumors regular
Sep 22, 2011
224
87
I'd not recommend it even though it's possible. Every update becomes a worry and you will run into random problems. I've been there done that.
I would agree with this. especially if you're looking to use iCloud services. I don't know if its still the case, but I recall that years ago you needed to provide a legitimate Mac serial number to run a Hackintosh to fake services like iMessage into running. I think the effort involved and potential to break something with any update just isn't worth it. If you're looking to tinker and this is not your primary/production machine, that's a different story. (But again, the Eula technically doesn't permit you to do this)
 

ignatius345

macrumors 68020
Aug 20, 2015
2,320
3,077
I haven't gone the Hackintosh route, but from everything I've read keeping a setup running becomes like a hobby. @aroldanf, it sounds from what people here are saying like you'd be much better off investing in an actual Mac if you want to run MacOS.

If it's any consolation, at some point used and refurbished 2018 Minis will probably start appearing in the next year if you can wait...