Running MacBook Unibody 6,1 without battery

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by raptor402, Aug 8, 2013.

  1. raptor402 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2011
    #1
    Hello, forum

    My old Late 2009 Unibody MacBook suffered some water (coke) damage at the hands of my brother a couple of years ago. After a lot of troubleshooting, it ended up with a busted keyboard. A few days ago, I finally decided to put it to use, hoping to convert it into a mini desktop without the battery, screen or keyboard. It was all going well until I read yesterday that MacBook power adapter do not provide full power, and so when running without a battery, MacBooks are heavily under-clocked. The last reference to the article I could find was way back in 2008, before the introduction of non-removable batteries, and the apple page no longer exists.

    My question is: will my MacBook 6,1 be under-clocked and perform badly should I run it without a battery?

    Any help will be appreciated. I'll upload a link to pics once I'm done with the project regardless.

    Regards
    Raptor
     
  2. seveej macrumors 6502a

    seveej

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2009
    Location:
    Helsinki, Finland
    #2
    Greetings,

    I have no experience with that specific model, but I have had experiences with the previous generation (5,1 @ 2,4 Ghz) both using a totally busted battery and later without said battery, and my experience was that no slowdown was noticeable (using 60 W charger).

    My mother's been using a 2006 MBP without battery for some years (that machine "killed" every battery which was put into it) and has experienced no slowdown (85 W charger).

    I'd suggest you try it out, but make sure that your charger's either a 60 pr 85 W model.

    RGDS,
     
  3. raptor402 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2011
    #3
    Thanks for your response, sir. I have a 85W adapter (patch job of two broken adapters), so I guess I shouldn't have much of a problem.
     
  4. raptor402 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2011
    #4
    Well, it boots fine and seems to be working alright.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. seveej macrumors 6502a

    seveej

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2009
    Location:
    Helsinki, Finland
    #5
    Looks cool...

    RGDS,
     
  6. seveej, Aug 16, 2013
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2013

    seveej macrumors 6502a

    seveej

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2009
    Location:
    Helsinki, Finland
    #6
    raptor402.

    Your pics got me thinking:

    What is the thermal behavior of you MacBook, such as it was in the pic. Does it run hotter or cooler than within the case?

    RGDS,
     
  7. raptor402 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2011
    #7
    Actually, I've been wondering the same thing. It was just a quick boot test, so I wasn't able to log heat, etc. I plan to put in a homemade wooden chassis, so heat is a concern. But I suppose it shouldn't be too bad. I'll let you know once I've completed the project.

    Regards
    Raptor
     
  8. seveej macrumors 6502a

    seveej

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2009
    Location:
    Helsinki, Finland
    #8
    Allright!
    Sounds interesting. Keep me posted.

    Keep in mind, that when you do a wooden chassis, you should add some EM-shielding...

    RGDS,
     
  9. raptor402 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2011
    #9
    Thank you for pointing that out, sir. I really hadn't thought about it. I guess the easiest way to go about that would be to use ESD bags from 3.5" hdd. Considering the logic board size, I'll need two. I'll seal them together and make sealed incisions for screws and cables (I'm mounting the board on the original board tray pried from the chassis).

    Once again, thank you.

    Regards
    Raptor
     
  10. seveej macrumors 6502a

    seveej

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2009
    Location:
    Helsinki, Finland
    #10
    I once did a project like this. Almost...

    This was waaay back, because I was transferring stuff I had in a pre-ATX case, and one of my main ideas was to dampen the noise level of the machine... Anyway, the case was ready, but then my Mobo took some damage and my next PC was ATX- based and the entire hardwood case was a lost cause.

    Anyway, I remember having talked it over back then with an engineer, whose recommendation was to take aluminium foil (the thicker variant), and attach it to the inside of the wooden case ...

    HTH,
     

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