Running MBP at high load

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by karohan, Aug 9, 2011.

  1. karohan macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2010
    #1
    How safe is it for the long term safety of my MBP to run at high load for the majority of the time. I don't game, but I do run some scientific applications that cause my MBP to run at high CPU/GPU load for a considerable amount of time. The temperatures are always within the max temperatures allowed (CPU is usually between 55 and 80, but almost never above 95 C and the GPU is similar but usually never above 85 C, I think). Does running the MBP at high but technically "safe" load add any risk to the longevity of my machine?

    When I'm at work, I usually run in clamshell mode too, and I feel like this causes a little higher temperatures. I can always open the lid to reduce some of the heat buildup if this is a problem.
     
  2. Eddyisgreat macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2007
    #2
    It's a Macbook Pro not a Babybook Dandelion. Work that mofo :D
     
  3. Freyqq macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2004
    #3
    Opening the lid and maybe buying a cheap cooling pad would be my advice...but if the computer ever overheated it is designed to shut down. The only part that I'd worry about wear and tear of high heat would be the hd bc it is the most fragile part of any computer.
     
  4. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #4
    The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat (around 100C/212F - 105C/221F, depending on your processor). iStat Pro will give you accurate readings of your temps, among other things.

    Unless there is a rare defect in your Mac, your temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload you're putting on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.

    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis). They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level. If they're spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC. Also, make sure you don't block the vents, which are located at the rear, near the hinge.

    Learn about the fans in your Mac
    Apple Portables: Operating temperature

    Your MBP is designed to run without problems in clamshell mode. Having the lid open or closed doesn't make a significant difference in keeping your Mac within normal operating temps.
     
  5. gorskiegangsta macrumors 65816

    gorskiegangsta

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2011
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    #5
    Modern processors are designed to withstand sustained temps of 100C or lower for long periods of time. As long as the laptop's cooling system works properly at keeping temps from reaching critical levels (usually 110C-120C) you should be fine.
     
  6. getz76 macrumors 6502a

    getz76

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2009
    Location:
    Hell, AL
    #6
    The Intel CPU will throttle itself if it starts getting too hot which will keep it from the critical temperature; you might have a slowdown instead of a meltdown. You should be fine.

    Hope you like the sound of high-revving fans, though!
     
  7. karohan thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2010
    #7
    Thanks for the replies. I've been using iStat Pro to monitor my temperatures, but yeah, they I've always been well within the safe operating range. I was just curious if you could see a "wear and tear" effect on the CPU or GPU, like you often do if you read/write too much on an HDD. I've already needed an HDD replaced (after a year, but I had AppleCare), and while that is probably an anomaly, I take even more frequent backups now.
     
  8. m85476585 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2008
    #8
    It would really be better if people didn't use iStat pro. Just don't worry about it- the cooling system is well designed with built-in safety mechanisms to protect the computer.

    No, you can't wear out a CPU. Unlike a hard drive there are no moving parts. I'm sure they have a finite life, but 99% of the time that's longer than the life of the computer itself. If anything your fans might wear out sooner, but those are easy enough to replace.
     
  9. w00t951 macrumors 68000

    w00t951

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    #9
    Don't believe this. A GPU is especially easy to destroy by over clocking or overvolting, but the same can happen to a CPU.
     
  10. Eddyisgreat macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2007
    #10
    Pretty sure he is talking towards scenarios under spec, not extreme loads.
     
  11. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #11
    Not under normal use, however. Yes, components have a finite life, but most users will replace their computers long before that time is up.
     
  12. karohan thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2010
    #12
    What characterizes extreme loads? From what I understand, the power management of the Nvidia 330m chip (but probably others as well) has different power states (0, 1, 2, and 3), where lower numbers correspond to greater performance power states. I am always running on power state 0 (the greatest performance state).

    EDIT: But the temperatures are still always under control (at 65 C now)
     
  13. Alexjones macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 28, 2010
    #13
    Look on the bright side. If it goes over 105c, You can open the clamshell , throw a couple of burgers on it and rename it George Forman grill pro
     
  14. m85476585 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2008
    #14
    Yes but not at stock voltage. I assume most people are not overclocking their MBPs.
     
  15. getz76 macrumors 6502a

    getz76

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2009
    Location:
    Hell, AL
    #15
    No talk of anything but stock configuration here. Do not worry about this at all. As long as you don't have a manufacturing defect, you will have a truly obsolete machine before you break down.
     
  16. karohan thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2010
    #16
    Cool, so running the GPU in its max performance state at all times is fine, right? I'm not overclocking past its configured setting, just using its max available power.
     
  17. getz76 macrumors 6502a

    getz76

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2009
    Location:
    Hell, AL
    #17
    You should be fine, as long as there is not a manufacturing defect. Make sure you back up your hard drive as it is the most likely failure point in machines these days. Keep an eye on your system fans, especially if you are in a dusty environment.
     
  18. karohan thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2010
    #18
    Yeah I backup pretty frequently. I've had my share of HDD's fail me before =D
     

Share This Page