Running Windows on a Mac

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by sergiuria, May 12, 2009.

  1. sergiuria macrumors 6502a

    sergiuria

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    Location:
    Near a bunch of T-Rex
    #1
    There a a couple of programs I need to use for college, and they are only available for Windows :(

    What do you guys recommend? VMware? Parallel? Bootcamp? Other? and why?

    Thanks for the help!
     
  2. GuntherS macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2007
    Location:
    Belgium
    #2
    What programs are we talking about?
    CPU/GPU intensive tasks better run natively with Bootcamp.
    For small programs that require less power, you can use Parallels or Fusion.
     
  3. sergiuria thread starter macrumors 6502a

    sergiuria

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    Location:
    Near a bunch of T-Rex
    #3
    They are rather simple programs, one being "Raptor .rap" But nothing too intense on the computer.

    What are the diferences on Parallel and VMware? is there any?
     
  4. eXan macrumors 601

    eXan

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2005
    Location:
    Russia
    #4
    Bootcamp for performance (games)
    Desktop for convenience.

    Thats how i use it.
     
  5. JNB macrumors 604

    JNB

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2004
    Location:
    In a Hell predominately of my own making
    #5
    Mostly the same, match up fairly well feature for feature. I used to use Parallels, been on VMWare's Fusion for a couple years now.

    I prefer Fusion because it gives me the ability to run additional virtual machines provided by work that were created with our corporate instance (Windows) of VMWare. The .vmdk files (virtual disks) created are platform-agnostic, so I don't need anything additional to support a multitude of platforms and applications that I train.
     
  6. scienide09 macrumors 65816

    scienide09

    Joined:
    May 5, 2007
    Location:
    Canada
    #6
    You can also try VirtualBox. It does the same basic virtualization as Fusion or Parallels, but doesn't have some of the extra features, such as unity-mode.

    The trade off is balanced by the fact that VirtualBox is free, while the others will cost you some money.
     
  7. sergiuria thread starter macrumors 6502a

    sergiuria

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    Location:
    Near a bunch of T-Rex
    #7
    Read it, but didn't understand what it was. Care to explain?

    Thanks everyone!
     
  8. sergiuria thread starter macrumors 6502a

    sergiuria

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    Location:
    Near a bunch of T-Rex
    #8
    Got it now! it's pretty cool!! but, I'm not going to pay $70 for just that :p
     
  9. scienide09 macrumors 65816

    scienide09

    Joined:
    May 5, 2007
    Location:
    Canada
    #9
    I'll assume that means you wanted an explanation of unity-mode, but with a little more digging you sorted it out for yourself. Kudos for being proactive!

    I've virtualized an RC of Windows 7 on my MacBook, but found it wanting. When I moved it to my MBP (with more RAM), things were better. I should be getting a copy of WinXP in the next couple of weeks, at which point I'll probably go the BootCamp route.
     
  10. Toofan macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2009
    #10
    It depends...
    If you want to run only one OS at a time, use Bootcamp for free.
    If you want to run two OS's at one time...
    Use parallels if you're less concerned about fluid movement between OS's
    Use VM Fusion if you're more concerned about fluid movement between OS's

    VM Fusion is slightly more expensive the Paralleling software, but if you've got a newer Mac, you won't regret Fusion.

    So 2 things to keep in mind...
    1) System specs make a HUGE difference when running multiple OS's simultaneously
    2) Do you even need two OS's to be running simultaneously?
     
  11. sergiuria thread starter macrumors 6502a

    sergiuria

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    Location:
    Near a bunch of T-Rex
    #11
    I don't need them running at the same time, but it would certainly be easier and more comfortable.
     
  12. budkid macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    #12
    IF you use bootcamp, i recommend you use rEFIt. So you will be able to choose which partition to run at startup.
     
  13. eXan macrumors 601

    eXan

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2005
    Location:
    Russia
    #13
    No, you don't need anything.

    Just press and hold the Alt (Option) key after the startup sound and choose whichever you need it to boot.
     
  14. Houls macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2008
    #14
    VBox

    I'm using Virtual Box to run XP OS X. I need to run Windows specific software for some work stuff so I went this route. I downloaded VBox (free) installed a copy of XP that I already owned (free) upgraded my MacBook RAM to 4GB ($50) and dedicated 1GB of that RAM to run XP. All in all I ended up with a pretty sweet dual machine for less than it cost for Parallels or Fusion and I also maxed out my RAM for optimal performance. Win Win as far as I'm concerned. Good Luck.
     
  15. elgrecomac macrumors 65816

    elgrecomac

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Location:
    San Diego
    #15
    And....

    It is not as fast nor anywhere near as stable as Fusion. I feel it is a classic case of you get what you paid for....:eek:
     
  16. elgrecomac macrumors 65816

    elgrecomac

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Location:
    San Diego
    #16

    Be careful....you are going to Law School, the Exam-taking software doesnt not work well with Fusion or Parallels. Bootcamp will be you only choice.
     

Share This Page