Safe temperature/time for CPU

Discussion in 'Mac mini' started by matarielz, Jul 21, 2014.

  1. matarielz macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2014
    #1
    I need to run an MPI process that will demand 100% of all 4 cores of my mini 2012. Would it be safe to run it for about 60-80 hours??? I've tried it for about 10 min. and temps go up to between 95-100 degrees celsius. If it is not safe safe is there a way it can be done without damaging the mini? Fan runs at about 4500rpm @95 degrees
     
  2. jdblas69 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2012
    #2
    I have run handbrake for 48 hours straight with the fans kicked in going full speed and holding the temps around 95 celsius. No problems.

    If the temps get too hot the mini has temp sensors to shut down to prevent any damage.
     
  3. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Location:
    Inside
    #3
    As stated above, it is fine for a Mac Mini to be running that hot for a long period of time. They were designed with it in mind.
     
  4. haravikk macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    May 1, 2005
    #4
    As said, if the temperature were too much for the Mac Mini it would switch itself off.

    More importantly, modern processors are aware of their own temperature, and will throttle their performance in order to remain within a target temperature. If you've seen a processor mention TDP then this is partly what this refers to, along with the maximum power that the part should draw.

    While this means it's safe to run the processor for long periods, it also means that your Mac Mini may only run at the true maximum speed of its processor in short bursts; during prolonged use it will settle at a level that keeps it within its target temperature. This is one of the things that distinguishes a quad-core Mac Mini from a quad-core Mac Pro (once you've adjusted for other differences) as the Mac Pro is designed to run with the processor at full speed for prolonged periods (though it presumably still throttles a bit if you also push both GPUs as well).
     
  5. ctyhntr macrumors 6502

    ctyhntr

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2010
    #5
    I have the same concern as I'm thinking of using my new 2012 i7 mac mini for 720p livestreaming. On my 2012 i7 macbook pro, it draws 90% cpu, 5000rpm, and 180-195 degrees fahrenheit. I use laptop fan cooler, and it helps bring it down 10 degrees. I haven't dared 1080p for more than 1 hour stretch in fear of thermal shutdown.

    Are there any external cooling either passive heatsinks or fans that are effective for the mac mini?
     
  6. eezacque Guest

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2013
    #6
    The processor may be able to take the heat in the short run, but heat does shorten the life of components in the long run. With an architecture where everything is soldered onto the logic board, repairs are no longer feasible. So, while your machine running hot does not kill it now, it will shorten its life (it is a bit like smoking for humanoids)
     
  7. Mr. Retrofire macrumors 601

    Mr. Retrofire

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Location:
    www.emiliana.cl/en
    #7
    Your MBP supports hardware accelerated H.264 encoding via Quick Sync (for example for Air Play). This reduces the CPU temperature and allows 1080p H.264 encoding in realtime.
     
  8. ctyhntr macrumors 6502

    ctyhntr

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2010
    #8
    How do I confirm that this is enabled? I'm using Wirecast for streaming.

     
  9. Mr. Retrofire macrumors 601

    Mr. Retrofire

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Location:
    www.emiliana.cl/en
    #9
    Yes. Turbo Boost reduces the CPU speed automatically, if necessary. You can see the details with this tool:
    https://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/intel-power-gadget-20
     
  10. Mr. Retrofire macrumors 601

    Mr. Retrofire

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Location:
    www.emiliana.cl/en
    #10
    Wirecast uses the Mainconcept H.264 and x264 software libraries, which means that Wirecast does not use Quick Sync.
     

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