sample a guitar riff

Discussion in 'Digital Audio' started by mpaitgt, Jul 26, 2008.

  1. mpaitgt macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
    #1
    hey i'm new and this is my first post..

    i'm a musician looking to be able to chop up a song so i can sample a guitar riff and not hear the rest of the song.. i've been looking everywhere for a software to do that and i haven't had any luck.

    thanks if you have any advice or answers!!!
     
  2. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Location:
    On the Left Coast - Victoria BC Canada
    #2
    Realize that when you do this, you will get the guitar riff, plus bass and drums and whatever else is playing at that time. Unless the source song has a riff that is solo that you can sample, you're going to have a battle to use it -- it isn't possible to completely isolate one instrument from others on a stereo track.

    You should be able to use any audio software, such as Garageband, Audacity, Bias Peak, etc. to edit the waveform of the song down to the one slice of time where your target riff is. You could also do this with a hardware sampler such as an Akai MPC.

    Have a read through the sticky posts at the top of the Digital Audio forum.
     
  3. headfuzz macrumors 6502

    headfuzz

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2007
    Location:
    Brighton, UK
    #3
    Melodyne DNA is the only software that can do this properly, yet I've only seen that demo isolating indivdual notes from a chord, so I don't know how well it functions isolating one intstrument from an entire section of an arrangement.

    You can use a band pass filter to isolate the frequency range of the guitar part but if you have other sounds in the same frequency range (vocals, for example) these will obviously be allowed by the filter as well. YMMV.

    Beyond that, the only way to truly isolate a guitar part would be through phase inversion cancellation, but seeing as it's HIGHLY unlikely you have a version of the song that is EXACTLY the same as the other but without the guitar part, recorded at the same sample rate and volume, I won't bother explaining the theory behind this. ;)
     

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