sandy bridge hotter than last gen cpu's??????

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by macbook pro i5, Jul 26, 2011.

  1. macbook pro i5 macrumors 65816

    macbook pro i5

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    #1
    hi guys I'm curios to know if the sandy bridge processors exert more heat than say the last gen i5's and i7's because my dads last gen quad core i7 machine does not exert much heat where as in my 2011 baseline mbp can be used to make an omlette with the heat it is producing:eek:
     
  2. mark28 macrumors 68000

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    Jan 29, 2010
    #2
    Yes, the Sandy Bridge Quad Cores run hotter than the last gen. Last-gen only had a TDP of 35W.

    The Quad Cores can literally consume more than twice as much power under load which also indicates that it produces a lot more heat.
     
  3. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

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    #3
    Last year's [2010] MacBook Pros are all dual core. ;)
     
  4. wywern209 macrumors 65832

    wywern209

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    #4
    OP, if you want low heat like your dad's MBP, get next years ivy bridge macbook pro. as an added bonus u also get USB3 and 3d transistors n stuff. and lower tdp which means less heat. however, if the rumors and the latest mac mini are anything to go by, the next macs will not have a built in optical drive so an external will be necessary.
     
  5. macbook pro i5 thread starter macrumors 65816

    macbook pro i5

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    #5
    no he has a PC:(
     
  6. macbook pro i5 thread starter macrumors 65816

    macbook pro i5

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    #6
    ok so will it be logical to assume that the ivy bridge processors will run even hotter if so thats a worry:eek:
     
  7. Heavertron macrumors regular

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    #7
    You didn't read it right...

    Ivy bridge is a die-shrink of Sandy Bridge (plus other enhancements) so it will consume less power and have a lower TDP rating at similar clock speeds.

    = run cooler
     
  8. macbook pro i5 thread starter macrumors 65816

    macbook pro i5

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    #8
    oh yes my apologies didn't read your post at all
     
  9. wywern209 macrumors 65832

    wywern209

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    #9
    yes. he's right. ivy is a die shrink and has a lower tdp of 35 as opposed to this yr's 45W tdp for the quads. but next years processors will still be faster because of advancement in transistor design.
     
  10. macbook pro i5 thread starter macrumors 65816

    macbook pro i5

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    #10
    Well,We now have ivy bridge and know it runs hotter then sandy bridge,I was right after all:D
     
  11. colour macrumors regular

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    Mar 13, 2009
    #11
    You waited 1 year to reply with that ?

    [​IMG]
     
  12. macbook pro i5 thread starter macrumors 65816

    macbook pro i5

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    #12
    Yes:D
     
  13. biohead macrumors 6502

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    #13
    And your information is wrong.

    Overclocked IVB runs hotter than overclocked SNB. At stock speeds and voltages this isn't the case. If you care about temps as much as you let on, you wouldn't be overclocking anyway (not that it's a particularly good idea on a laptop anyway).
     
  14. macbook pro i5 thread starter macrumors 65816

    macbook pro i5

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    #14
    I will infancy overclock on my custom built PC at the end of the year,but I have read overclocked or not ivy bridge is hotter.
     
  15. dusk007 macrumors 68040

    dusk007

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    #15
    Actually even the default clock mobile Ivy Bridge aren't really any cooler. They might not be hotter but they aren't cooler either as everybody expected.

    http://www.notebookcheck.com/Im-Test-Intel-Ivy-Bridge-Quad-Core-Prozessoren.72390.0.html
    There are no measured temps in the test or any other that I know of but the power consumption under load is actually equal to slightly worse which implies that nothings is going to be significantly better in terms of heat.
     
  16. w00t951 macrumors 68000

    w00t951

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    #16
    1) The Ivy Bridge architecture consumes around 19% less power and produces 20% less heat than the Sandy Bridge series.

    2) Those "overheating" results with Ivy Bridge were a result of poorly applied thermal paste. Some people saw temperature drops of 20C when the paste was applied properly.
     
  17. dusk007 macrumors 68040

    dusk007

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    #17
    Read the article the mobile ones are only somewhat faster but they run as hot as the old ones. A Notebook with Ivy Bridge instead of Sandy Bridge won't be a cooler notebook.

    The Desktop results don't compare because at the desktop side the TDP changed.
     
  18. Mac32 macrumors 65816

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    #18
    The big question is: Will the new MacBook Pros use Ivy Bridge CPUs with poorly applied thermal paste, or was this only a problem with the first batch of CPUs from the Ivy Bridge production?
     
  19. biohead macrumors 6502

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    #19
    Laptop versions of Intel CPUs don't usually have the heat spreader on them at all - so they should be fine.

    The "problem" is that in SNB, the heat spreaders were fixed to the chip using fluxless solder. In IVB, cheap thermal paste is used instead. Solder has much better thermal properties so dissipates the heat better. It's just Intel being cheap, not a problem as such.

    Remember the laptop chips are bound by the thermal envelope, so an IVB chip with a TDP of 35w will get no hotter than an SNB chip with a 35w TDP.
     

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