Scanner that mails PDF

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by cerberusss, Jul 14, 2014.

  1. cerberusss macrumors 6502a

    cerberusss

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2013
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    #1
    At work, we've got a humongous all-in-one. You can scan a page and then mail it as a PDF. It can also scan a bunch of pages as one job, and then collect them in a single PDF.

    Are there scanners (or all in one devices) that can do this? Or alternatively, it scans and sends it to a Mac wirelessly.
     
  2. RMo macrumors 65816

    RMo

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2007
    Location:
    Iowa, USA
    #2
    Is this just for you are you using a multiuser/multidevice environment? I'll assume the latter and have a couple recommendations. I'm most familiar with Brother because I've owned a couple at home and I support several of them at work (and they work well with Macs), but other manufacturers may have similar options.

    1. If you just want to be able to scan but don't particularly care that it be delivered via e-mail, try something like the Brother DCP-7065dn. This can be connected via USB or Ethernet, but if you connect it via Ethernet to your network (e.g., into an open port on a network switch such as the one that may be built-in to your router), you can use it from devices connected via Wi-Fi on the same network, whcih is what most people really want when they say "wireless printing" (or scanning).

      With this printer, you can initiate scans from your computer using Preview or any similar application that allows you to create files from scans (pretty much anything with an Import command in the File menu will open Image Capture and allow you to select the scanner to do this).

      Alternatively, with Brother's software (Control Center), you can configure the printer to initiate scans on its own by pressing a couple buttons. You can also use Control Center to initiate scans from your computer instead of using the built-in OS X mechanism. I actually prefer Control Center to OS X's native capabilities here (and that's saying something because I usually hate third-party programs on Windows or Mac for this), but you may have your own preferences.

    2. If you do want it actually delivered e-mail, you'll need a printer that is capable of sending files to an SMTP server. I believe brother calls this "Internet Fax" or "I-Fax." I know the MFC-8890dw is capable of doing this, but I'm sure several others are too (that's just the only one I've ever used that does). You'll need to have an SMTP server (not necessarily your own--any e-mail provider's should work here) that you can configure the printer to send mail using and an e-mail account capable of receiving these attachments. The latter usually isn't a big problem, but if you're scanning high-DPI, multipage color documents, you may run into file size limits.

    Personally, I'd prefer option 1, but option 2 can be convenient if you do a lot of the same type of documents (e.g., black and white scans of relatively small documents).

    Hope this helps. Again, these are just a couple models I know of. I'm guessing pretty much any networked Brother (or most other manufacturers) printer will support option 1, but only a subset of those will support option 2.
     
  3. flynz4 macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #3
    Fujitsu ScanSnap iX500 is the gold standard. I have the predecessor S1500M which is also good, but does not have wireless LAN. One of the options is "scan to email"... but that is done via one of the clients.

    I have mine connected to my iMac via USB. If anyone in the house wants to scan something for themselves, they scan it to my machine, and the PDF is automatically stored in a shared dropbox folder available to everyone.

    However, I primarily use it for scanning documents into DevonThink Pro Office which allows me to have a paperless office.

    ScanSnap is fantastic. It is full duplex (scans both sides at the same time). The iX500 scans 25 sheets per minute (50 sides) and places each job into a multi-page PDF. Auto straightening, auto blank page removal, auto flipping if a page is in backwards, etc. The feed mechanism is unbelievably good.

    When my wife and I are cleaning up a batch of paper... I typically scan, and my wife shreds. We have a great shredder, but she cannot keep up with my scanning.

    /Jim
     
  4. glenthompson macrumors 68000

    glenthompson

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2011
    Location:
    Virginia
    #4
    I use a Fujitsu ScanSnap that connects via USB but the newer model supports wireless. The provided software converts the scans to a PDF or JPEG.

    I used to use a copier at work for scans like you describe. The ScanSnap is a comparable replacement for a single user device.
     
  5. cerberusss thread starter macrumors 6502a

    cerberusss

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2013
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    #5
    Wow, excellent answers.

    It's for a home office, and I'll be the only one that uses it. Under these circumstances, I usually go and see if there's a second-hand available. So I appreciate the older models mentioned.

    As for the wireless part, I actually should've said "connected to the network". Wireless is finicky (in my environment) and I've never had problems with ethernet.

    Anyway, thanks for the options so far, I'm going to look through the suggestions.

    ----------

    Is it able to scan postcards or any other funny formats?
     
  6. flynz4 macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #6
    It can scan anything that is flat... so yes, postcards, photo christmas cards, post-it notes, business cards, 200 page contracts... it does it all. To see it in operation.. it is remarkable.

    Don't get confused into choosing a flatbed model. I have a few of these in the house that I've used over the years... but they largely go unused. One of the things that I remember reading about setting up a paperless office is that a full duplex sheet fed scanner is required... and that anyone trying to do this with a flatbed will eventually give up due to frustration.

    The ScanSnap does NOT have a wired configuration. I have found it unnecessary as I keep mine attached to my iMac via USB, and if I want to scan to a different device (or for someone else in my family)... I simply "scan to folder", which is configured to put the PDF into a shared dropbox folder we all have access to. From there, the person scanning moves it to its final destination on their personal machine. Honestly... we only use this for well under 1% of all scanning.

    I have scanned all types of old photographs into my pictures directory, and then imported them into Aperture.

    Most of the time I scan directly to DevonThink Pro Office. DPTO has direct support for Fujitsu, and is unbelievable if you want a paperless office. It uses artificial intelligence and the more you use it, the better it gets. I personally do not let it auto-file... but instead, I use the "magic hat" to suggest where each document gets filed. Filing is almost as easy as repetitively pressing the "next" key. It is that good. Scary good.

    /Jim
     
  7. glenthompson macrumors 68000

    glenthompson

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2011
    Location:
    Virginia
    #7
    I have successfully scanned tiny roll type receipts that are 1.5" wide by a couple inches long with no problem. Scanned some old photos then reprinted them to compare. The reprint had more contrast but it was hard to tell which was which.

    Used it to scan some spiral bound books my wife had so she could use them on her iPad. No problem with the edge perforations.

    I think I have had less than 10 jams/misfeeds in a year and a half and over 10k pages.
     
  8. flynz4 macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #8
    As I said... the Fujitsu ScanSnap is the "gold standard" to compare every other scanner to.

    /Jim
     

Share This Page