scanning photos then edit in camera raw question?

argo063

macrumors member
Original poster
Aug 7, 2010
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Hey People
Got A little problem
I scan a slide at 4400dpi.
Then when i get to camera raw and make the scan look better and then save it. you can only get a max resoultion of 1000.

Any ideas how to fix this or will the scan still be the same size. eg the size of the file never changes.

Thanks
 

Nov 28, 2010
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located
How do you scan it and what format do you store the scanned photo in (TIFF, TGA, ...) and with "camera raw" do you mean Adobe Camera Raw?
 

argo063

macrumors member
Original poster
Aug 7, 2010
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How do you scan it and what format do you store the scanned photo in (TIFF, TGA, ...) and with "camera raw" do you mean Adobe Camera Raw?
Hey
I scan it with epson V700. Using vuescan. Scan as a tiff file mean best quality.
And yes i mean adobe raw with bridge.
 

argo063

macrumors member
Original poster
Aug 7, 2010
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As well i do not compress the tiff at any time. Adobe Camera raw does a great job editing the files and really good for bulk scanning.
 

argo063

macrumors member
Original poster
Aug 7, 2010
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Have you changed any settings for image size in Camera Raw?

http://newschoolofphotography.com/content/134-printing-huge.html
Yes i have. I change the colour bits to 16 and change tryed to change the resolution to 4400 but it say max is 999. :(

Oh but i did not see the size drop down box. Would this make a bigger picture?
i would think so. but the resolution would still be 999 :(. i printed it at A3 and it printed very well so maybe that 4400 still in there.
 

Bear

macrumors G3
Jul 23, 2002
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Sol III - Terra
As well should i be saving the tiff and a raw of the scan file?
i do edit the files. Im trying to get best possible quality
Does the scanner driver/software actually provide raw data? If it doesn't, then converting it to adobe camera raw doesn't really gain you much since it's not the raw data from the scanner. Just make sure you don't overwrite your original TIFF file from the scanner.
 

bocomo

macrumors 6502
Jun 29, 2007
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New York
Yes i have. I change the colour bits to 16 and change tryed to change the resolution to 4400 but it say max is 999. :(

Oh but i did not see the size drop down box. Would this make a bigger picture?
i would think so. but the resolution would still be 999 :(. i printed it at A3 and it printed very well so maybe that 4400 still in there.
Aha! The problem is that you are talking about resolution, not image size!
 

Designer Dale

macrumors 68040
Mar 25, 2009
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Yes i have. I change the colour bits to 16 and change tryed to change the resolution to 4400 but it say max is 999. :(

Oh but i did not see the size drop down box. Would this make a bigger picture?
i would think so. but the resolution would still be 999 :(. i printed it at A3 and it printed very well so maybe that 4400 still in there.
I looked this up on the net and it's a 48 bit scanner. Maybe it's a math thing, 48bit@4400 might be equal to 16bit@~1000?

At any rate, this might be more of a technical exercise than a practical one. Scanning at 4400 dpi at 48 bit color will give you a file that is roughly equal to a digital copy of a film slide, but you can't print that. A high quality professional print max out at around 300 dpi, and I don't think the human eye can really discern the difference without a loupe.

A film slide effectively has no dpi. It's composed of dye clouds left over from the chemical processing of silver salts. Printers try to replicate that, but just can't. It's a different animal.

Grain in Film Photography

Correct me if I'm wrong.

Dale
 

bocomo

macrumors 6502
Jun 29, 2007
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New York
48 bit is just a 16 bit file, each of the color channels-RGB-at 16 bits
24 bit is an 8 bit RGB file

He's correct to scan in at a high DPI (capture resolution), but there usually isn't any need to keep the file at that resolution

Just open the scanned file in Photoshop (not camera raw) and go to Image>Image Size

Then uncheck the box labeled Resample

Next, change the resolution to 300 DPI and you're finished. You can now print the file at its largest native size (what was captured)

If you want asmaller size, just go back to Image Size and check the resample box and then change the size
 

argo063

macrumors member
Original poster
Aug 7, 2010
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48 bit is just a 16 bit file, each of the color channels-RGB-at 16 bits
24 bit is an 8 bit RGB file

He's correct to scan in at a high DPI (capture resolution), but there usually isn't any need to keep the file at that resolution

Just open the scanned file in Photoshop (not camera raw) and go to Image>Image Size

Then uncheck the box labeled Resample

Next, change the resolution to 300 DPI and you're finished. You can now print the file at its largest native size (what was captured)

If you want asmaller size, just go back to Image Size and check the resample box and then change the size
But why should I scan at 48bit when a tiff file only 16. At moment I scan at 24 and I can't see any differnt .
 

bocomo

macrumors 6502
Jun 29, 2007
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New York
But why should I scan at 48bit when a tiff file only 16. At moment I scan at 24 and I can't see any differnt .
that 48 bit file IS at 16 bits. the confusing part is that it's 16 bits PER CHANNEL, which adds up to 48 (16 bits times 3, one for each color channel -- red, green, blue)

you won't see any difference, but it provides more editing headroom

feel free to scan at 24, shouldn't be a problem