Screen calibration?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by Kristenn, Sep 10, 2009.

  1. Kristenn macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2009
    #1
    Someone told me it is always good to calibrate laptop screens to get the color right if you buy them used. But I was wondering. Do you have to do it when you buy them new? My screen seems to look the same as all the Macintoshes at my school... so... maybe not. But could the screen look better?

    Im going to be doing keynote and lots of photo stuff for school soon so I kind of thought I should ask :eek:
     
  2. celticpride678

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    #2
    Screen calibration is really for people that have problems with their displays.
     
  3. Kristenn thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2009
    #3
    Oh okay. Well I dont have any problems with it at all really so I guess I don't need to. Thanks! :eek:
     
  4. jodelli macrumors 65816

    jodelli

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2008
    Location:
    Windsor, ON, Canada
    #4
    You don't need calibration unless you require accurate reproductions of graphic art or photographs for publication or sharing.
     
  5. UTclassof89 macrumors 6502

    UTclassof89

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2008
    #5
    monitor calibration is not for people who have problems with their displays; it's for minimizing the difference between onscreen color (RGB) and printed color (CMYK).
    (or if you have a really crappy screen (Dell), you can try to minimize color casts by compensating the opposite color, for example adding blue will minimize a yellow cast).

    Laptops with LCD screens are very hard to calibrate since the apparent color of each pixel depends hugely on the viewing angle (look at a screen filled with blue, and the bottom will look different than the top).
     
  6. mlblacy macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2006
    Location:
    the REAL Jersey Shore
    #6
    calibration...

    Actually... if you are doing photo stuff you SHOULD calibrate your screen. I use Spider2 with great results. My stuff onscreen matches all my printing proofs (CMYK). I get a lot of files from folks who are not calibrated, and yet wonder "why it looked fine on their screen".

    A caveat here though... concerning angle of view, and the effect it has on color/contrast etc. Many laptops, and some desktops have a poor angle of view ratio (meaning the image looks radically different depending where you are viewing the screen from). To check this, open up an image... shift the laptop side to side left to right... then change the tilt up and down on the screen angle. Notice a big difference in the color/contrast?? If so, calibration probably will be of limited help and use, as you have bigger issues regarding image consistency. I usually check out my computers at the apple store but moving my head up and down... and then sideways across the screen. I look like a freak, lol... but it gives you a basic idea of how wide the angle of view is on any given model.

    Printing calibration for any particular inkjet can be a nightmare. I find it usually helps to use matching brand inks & papers, and most importantly if you are printing from pshop, select "print from preview" as opposed to just "print". It can make a big difference as well...

    Good luck.
     
  7. dudeitsjay macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2009
    #7
    Wrong.

    I calibrated my 13'', 17'' and now 15'' (looking online right now for people who've uploaded profiles) the moment I took them out of the box. The eye wear is reduced and it looks just overall better and truer.

    Calibrations are for people who need color fidelity, and people who understand that factory settings out of the box is a terrible way to leave it.
     
  8. celticpride678

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    #8
    Wrong.:rolleyes:

    What you just described is an "issue" (not a real issue).
     
  9. Kristenn thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2009
    #9
    Thank you!

    Um... Dell actually makes some of the best monitors I have ever used. All monitors in our house are made by Dell. The color on them is basically the same as my MacBook Pro... unless Im color blind ><

    So... how can I go about calibrating? And is the a default factory setting if I dont like it?
     
  10. jodelli macrumors 65816

    jodelli

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2008
    Location:
    Windsor, ON, Canada
    #10
    You could start here in System Preferences/Displays. It's built in to the OS and thus free.
     

    Attached Files:

  11. GoKyu macrumors 65816

    GoKyu

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2007
    Location:
    New Orleans
    #11
    As others have said, monitor calibration is MAINLY used by people who want to get accurate colors when going from screen (RGB) to print (CMYK).

    I've been calibrating my screen about once a month since '06, and even though I'm not a pro, I'm still picky enough to do it because it makes my prints look great.

    Software-only calibration (i.e. the freebie method) is "good enough" if you won't be printing much, or if you're not serious about your photos. However, if you're even a serious amateur, you *WANT* to get a hardware calibration tool, because it really does make a difference.

    Most monitors (unless they're very high-end, specifically made for people who color correct for a living) WILL have some amount of color cast - usually yellow, red, or blue - you may not notice it (unless you're looking for it), but after you've calibrated your display, you should see a significant difference for the better.

    It doesn't even have to be all that expensive - you can get a basic Pantone Huey for under 65 bucks from B&H.
     
  12. Kristenn thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2009
    #12
    Ok thank you.

    Yes I have noticed grey came out blue once. But it actually came out a better color on my friends Sony VAIO FW. Not sure if she calibrated her screen or not but it looked very close.

    Anyway... I will have to mess with it next time I go to print some photos.
     
  13. Olivier L. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2009
    #13
    Display calibration is also good if you make website or prepare pictures for publishing on the web, not just for printing. It is a way to make sure your picture and colors looks the way you intend them to.

    Of course, you can not be sure (rather the contrary) that people's displays are calibrated, and that they will see the colors and brightness/darkness the smae you do. But publishing a correct original is still the first necessary step.
     

Share This Page