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yalag

Suspended
Original poster
Nov 18, 2007
1,448
81
I'm a dev with some time on my hands. SDK available next month. What is the coolest app idea you have?
 

0000757

macrumors 68040
Dec 16, 2011
3,894
850
I was semi hoping for a camera, cause then I could have Skype calls on my watch :cool:

However, I'd like an app that could integrate with the trolley system that my (soon to be :p) university uses, that would say buzz or send a notification when the trolley is about to come by my location/dorm.
 

iFanaddic

macrumors 6502a
Sep 24, 2008
818
241
Montréal, Canada
I'm a dev with some time on my hands. SDK available next month. What is the coolest app idea you have?

I want shazam to display the lyrics of the currently playing song on my Apple Watch, Karaoke on-the-go

I was also thinking the watch could create playlists according to heartbeat, time of day, locations etc..

I hope if someone ends up making millions out of the ideas they'll give me credit
 
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GreenAustin

macrumors member
Sep 17, 2014
39
1
I'm a dev with some time on my hands. SDK available next month. What is the coolest app idea you have?

It's difficult in some respects to formulate an idea without specifics regarding watch kit. I'm concerned the watch apps will be more of an extension than a stand alone app which would require an app on phone. That'd change any app ideas I might have at this moment...
 

HereBeMonsters

macrumors 6502
Jul 5, 2012
319
9
Fareham, UK
Bathroom break timer.

Put in your annual salary, hours you work, holidays etc. and it works out your hourly rate.

Then, when you go to the bathroom at work, you start the timer. Stop it when you get back to your desk, and that's how much your company just paid you to poo.
 

Piggie

macrumors G3
Feb 23, 2010
9,140
4,047
I think we can all see a problem here.

Someone asked a genuine question and we're struggling to think of much we'd want on out wrist, other than time, some notifications and perhaps some health monitoring stuff.

We all realize most things would be better done on the phone we are carrying as well. Bigger screen richer experience and VASTLY easier to use due to the size.

Does make you wonder if Apple might of considered not trying to make a Micro iPod touch for the wrist that runs many apps, and went to a more nice looking with useful notifications route instead.

Going to be interesting to see if, really most people just use the watch for the very very VERY bare basics as why struggle with the crown wheel finding the tiny icons on the tiny screen then struggle with the restricted used interface, when, by the time you've probably navigated your way to the mini app on the watch, you could of got your phone out and be using it.
 

TheAppleFairy

Suspended
Mar 28, 2013
2,588
2,223
The Clinton Archipelago unfortunately
I think we can all see a problem here.

Someone asked a genuine question and we're struggling to think of much we'd want on out wrist, other than time, some notifications and perhaps some health monitoring stuff.


I don't think the problem is that there isn't much more we can do on a watch, it's that the people who will create the apps haven't chimed in. More than likely there will be plenty of cool things that we can't think of when the question is just asked. There are some very clever people out there that develop amazing things. When the Smartphone came out similar comments were made.
 

Piggie

macrumors G3
Feb 23, 2010
9,140
4,047
I don't think the problem is that there isn't much more we can do on a watch, it's that the people who will create the apps haven't chimed in. More than likely there will be plenty of cool things that we can't think of when the question is just asked. There are some very clever people out there that develop amazing things. When the Smartphone came out similar comments were made.

Well, I accept there may be uses we never thought of.
Though that was a long time back before we'd even got to thinking about social media and photo's on a phone and such like.

I'm sure we can all think of apps, it's running them on a tiny screen with the limited user interface that's the issue.

If the watch had a 4" screen, which I admit would be silly, then we'd all know the apps we'd want.

Likewise they are going to have to be simple enough not to need much user input, and I do still think the fact you have to have your phone in your pocket, 2 seconds away from being used is an issue.

If the phone was at home, and the watch was it's 'Own Device' then of course, we'd be listing the things we use all the time and we want to watch to be able to offer.

Again, it's on your wrist with a tiny screen.
It's going to show you the time.
It's going to show you notifications
It's going to show you, say health things, your heartbeat, number of steps, how fast you are moving I suppose.

It's just feeling like it's great to look at to find out some information.

The trick is going to be do you then want to use the device to deal with the notification, or get the phone out.

Apple know this and have even shown easy replies.

ring ring, "Where are you"

You tap the "On my way home" button.

Perhaps more apps will use this approach?

Not sure if it's using text/speech stuff on the watch. Speaking to the watch and having it write out what you say seems an obvious need.
 

TheAppleFairy

Suspended
Mar 28, 2013
2,588
2,223
The Clinton Archipelago unfortunately
I agree with you, the limited interface does limit the possibilities quite a bit. Though I believe there will be some things that are possible that we haven't thought of.

I think if this is successful the 2nd and 3rd generation will be awesome. Though I plan on buying the 1st generation and be part of the beta pool.




Well, I accept there may be uses we never thought of.
Though that was a long time back before we'd even got to thinking about social media and photo's on a phone and such like.

I'm sure we can all think of apps, it's running them on a tiny screen with the limited user interface that's the issue.

If the watch had a 4" screen, which I admit would be silly, then we'd all know the apps we'd want.

Likewise they are going to have to be simple enough not to need much user input, and I do still think the fact you have to have your phone in your pocket, 2 seconds away from being used is an issue.

If the phone was at home, and the watch was it's 'Own Device' then of course, we'd be listing the things we use all the time and we want to watch to be able to offer.

Again, it's on your wrist with a tiny screen.
It's going to show you the time.
It's going to show you notifications
It's going to show you, say health things, your heartbeat, number of steps, how fast you are moving I suppose.

It's just feeling like it's great to look at to find out some information.

The trick is going to be do you then want to use the device to deal with the notification, or get the phone out.

Apple know this and have even shown easy replies.

ring ring, "Where are you"

You tap the "On my way home" button.

Perhaps more apps will use this approach?

Not sure if it's using text/speech stuff on the watch. Speaking to the watch and having it write out what you say seems an obvious need.
 

Rogifan

macrumors Penryn
Nov 14, 2011
24,451
31,722
I think we can all see a problem here.

Someone asked a genuine question and we're struggling to think of much we'd want on out wrist, other than time, some notifications and perhaps some health monitoring stuff.

We all realize most things would be better done on the phone we are carrying as well. Bigger screen richer experience and VASTLY easier to use due to the size.

Does make you wonder if Apple might of considered not trying to make a Micro iPod touch for the wrist that runs many apps, and went to a more nice looking with useful notifications route instead.

Going to be interesting to see if, really most people just use the watch for the very very VERY bare basics as why struggle with the crown wheel finding the tiny icons on the tiny screen then struggle with the restricted used interface, when, by the time you've probably navigated your way to the mini app on the watch, you could of got your phone out and be using it.

Good grief, the were 6 comments to the OP prior to you posting this. You cannot extrapolate 6 comments on a Internet message board to any broader meaning. :rolleyes:
 

kdarling

macrumors P6
A bunch of app ideas spring to mind:

"I've fallen and can't get up" alarm - watches for the distinctive accelerometer output indicating a human fall to the floor. Calls 911 for help.

Lifetime left timer - Uses Healthkit info and actuarial tables, to constantly calculate and display how many days of life you probably have left.

Pushup counter - Uses accelerometer to count push ups. Or sex acts.

Death Alert - calls for a coroner when it detects no pulse. Also texts next of kin who can begin to fight over their inheritance.

You know. The usual health stuff that we've come to expect of a smartwatch.

(Tongue partly in cheek.)
 

jason.siegel

macrumors 6502
Jun 15, 2011
448
48
Will Apple even allow standalone apps? I thought I had read somewhere that on Android, the watch apps come bundled with phone apps.
 

Julien

macrumors G4
Jun 30, 2007
11,835
5,432
Atlanta
Will Apple even allow standalone apps? I thought I had read somewhere that on Android, the watch apps come bundled with phone apps.

You will probably have to have an iPhone 'mother' version of the App on your iPhone too. The aWatch has limited functionality and will probably do very little data processing while limiting storage. So likely all Apps would need to move data back and forth to the 'mother' for all processing/data storage/configuration/setup/Mac/PC/Internet interaction.

EDIT: You will still be able to use aWatch Apps (at least some functions) without having you iPhone with you.

Do you see any problems with (probably) needing an iPhone 'mother' type app or just an observation?
 
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bbeagle

macrumors 68040
Oct 19, 2010
3,542
2,982
Buffalo, NY
Death Alert - calls for a coroner when it detects no pulse. Also texts next of kin who can begin to fight over their inheritance.

Actually, an app that can check an irregular heart beat, and the oncoming of a heart attack would be an amazing thing. It would have to run in the background all the time, as long as the HealthKit allows background monitoring of the heart beat.

But this would be a possible life-saving tool.
 

Piggie

macrumors G3
Feb 23, 2010
9,140
4,047
Actually, an app that can check an irregular heart beat, and the oncoming of a heart attack would be an amazing thing. It would have to run in the background all the time, as long as the HealthKit allows background monitoring of the heart beat.

But this would be a possible life-saving tool.

If I or any member of my family had a heart problem, and their beat needed monitoring as if there was a problem they could die.
I would not wish their life to depend on a $350 gadget from Apple.

I would want them wearing a professional, dependable night and day accurate piece of proper medical equipment that their life depended on.
 

iFanaddic

macrumors 6502a
Sep 24, 2008
818
241
Montréal, Canada
SDK available in Nov, any app ideas?

If I or any member of my family had a heart problem, and their beat needed monitoring as if there was a problem they could die.

I would not wish their life to depend on a $350 gadget from Apple.



I would want them wearing a professional, dependable night and day accurate piece of proper medical equipment that their life depended on.


I personally would love this function, not everybody that has heart attack is at risk.

I admit it may not be the best solution and would probably look for a "proper medical equipment" should I ever get one or know am I at risk.

But if you don't know...never had one, and not at risk (no family history, not overweight etc..)and the watch picks it up even before it happens it would be life changing for many I'm sure.

I read somewhere that some signs shows days if not weeks before a heart attack. Don't know if true though. But if it is imagine the possibilities.
 
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Rogifan

macrumors Penryn
Nov 14, 2011
24,451
31,722
If I or any member of my family had a heart problem, and their beat needed monitoring as if there was a problem they could die.
I would not wish their life to depend on a $350 gadget from Apple.

I would want them wearing a professional, dependable night and day accurate piece of proper medical equipment that their life depended on.

Anything like that I'm sure would require FDA approval. You're not going to see Watch or any Android Wear providing diagnosis or treatment information for anything health related. Unless either company decides to get into the medical devices business which I doubt they will.
 

Julien

macrumors G4
Jun 30, 2007
11,835
5,432
Atlanta
Actually, an app that can check an irregular heart beat, and the oncoming of a heart attack would be an amazing thing. It would have to run in the background all the time, as long as the HealthKit allows background monitoring of the heart beat.

But this would be a possible life-saving tool.

Anything like that I'm sure would require FDA approval....
Keep in mind it doesn't monitor your actual heart beat but instead your pulse (medically not the same thing). Also Rogifan is correct that in order to qualify as a medical monitor you would need FDA approval.
 

bbeagle

macrumors 68040
Oct 19, 2010
3,542
2,982
Buffalo, NY
Keep in mind it doesn't monitor your actual heart beat but instead your pulse (medically not the same thing). Also Rogifan is correct that in order to qualify as a medical monitor you would need FDA approval.

Of course if I developed an app like that I would be sure to research the specifics.

But, of course, somebody won't. Then Apple will pull the app because it doesn't have government approval, then Apple will get slammed by Android trolls for censorship. It's so predictable.
 

Piggie

macrumors G3
Feb 23, 2010
9,140
4,047
There is a world of difference, and I think we all know this, between proper medical equipment that costs lots of money had gone thru masses of harsh testing, and is used to save people's lives or give some medical reading, and a cheap consumer gadget that can kinda to someone similar, but does not really matter if it's not super accurate as it's only a guide.

I would presume there will have to be LOTS of legal disclaimers placed upon any body monitoring hardware/software saying that any information obtained using this hardware/software should only be used as a general guide and should not be relied upon if you suspect you have any medical condition, in which case you should seek professional medical attention.

Unfortunately we know there are going to be some people with some serious condition that do rely on a gadget like this.
 

Julien

macrumors G4
Jun 30, 2007
11,835
5,432
Atlanta
Of course if I developed an app like that I would be sure to research the specifics.

But, of course, somebody won't. Then Apple will pull the app because it doesn't have government approval, then Apple will get slammed by Android trolls for censorship. It's so predictable.

The aWatch can't meet FDA approval as a medical device under any type of medical usage. It's not even close to medical device standards and is strictly a consumer device. It is a hardware issue first and foremost before you even get to Apps. Apple (or Google) can not approve a medical App for a device that is not FDA approved. FDA approval is a stringent and complicated process.

Apple is working on FDA approval of the Health App when used with medical devices and it is in trail phases now.
 

kdarling

macrumors P6
Actually, an app that can check an irregular heart beat, and the oncoming of a heart attack would be an amazing thing. It would have to run in the background all the time, as long as the HealthKit allows background monitoring of the heart beat.

To be most useful and accurate, it would really need electrodes to receive the actual heartbeat waveform, not just read the blood pulse in an extremity as the Watch does.

For example, there are conditions where the heart might be beating at 150bpm, but because of the pattern, the pulse simply shows a normal 75bpm.

--

That said, I've seen studies where a change in average pulse rate over many years can be helpful in predicting heart failure.

For example, if someone with an average 70-85bpm rose over that after ten years, their chance of dying from heart disease rose 80%. Conversely, if their pulse rate dropped below that after ten years, their chances dropped 40%.

--

And yes, although my Death Watch idea was tongue in cheek, I think you're right that even a "novelty" app which gave out an alarm if your pulse rate radically changed up or down, could be useful beyond its required novelty label.
 

Piggie

macrumors G3
Feb 23, 2010
9,140
4,047
I had to smile when someone mentioned an App that automatically dialed 911 if it detected your pulse stopping.

Can you just imagine the chaos that would cause! :D

In theory a great idea, in general practice I think not.
 
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