Become a MacRumors Supporter for $25/year with no ads, private forums, and more!

MacRumors

macrumors bot
Original poster
Apr 12, 2001
54,475
16,528


Now available via Software Update:
Security Update 2006-004 is recommended for all users and improves the security of the following components.

AFP Server
Bluetooth
Bom
DHCP
dyld
fetchmail
gnuzip
ImageIO
LaunchServices
OpenSSH
telnet
WebKit

For detailed information on this Update, please visit this website: http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=61798.
 

Mal

macrumors 603
Jan 6, 2002
6,249
17
Orlando
I don't see why you couldn't. Do the install, choose shut down, then put your ram in and boot up again. I doubt it'll cause any problems.

jW
 

iMeowbot

macrumors G3
Aug 30, 2003
8,634
0
spicyapple said:
Is it a good idea to install this update at the same time as my new 2GB RAM installation?
For your own peace of mind, do one at a time. If anything goes wrong, you will have fewer possibilities to eliminate that way.
 

FoxyKaye

macrumors 68000
spicyapple said:
Is it a good idea to install this update at the same time as my new 2GB RAM installation? I hate to ruin my uptime, by rebooting twice...
I wouldn't do both at the same time. Although unlikely, in the event that something goes wrong on the system, it would be better to know if the cause is the RAM or the update. Besides, if you put both in and there's any issue, you'll wind up taking out the RAM as part of troubleshooting and having to reboot anyhow.

I'd put the RAM in first, reboot, repair permissions and make sure everything is OK. Then do the security update. I'd much rather lose "uptime" than try and fiddle with a system where a problem could be hardware or software related.

Mmmm... Security update.
 

arkhanjel

macrumors regular
Nov 3, 2003
166
169
FoxyKaye said:
I wouldn't do both at the same time. Although unlikely, in the event that something goes wrong on the system, it would be better to know if the cause is the RAM or the update. Besides, if you put both in and there's any issue, you'll wind up taking out the RAM as part of troubleshooting and having to reboot anyhow.

I'd put the RAM in first, reboot, repair permissions and make sure everything is OK. Then do the security update. I'd much rather lose "uptime" than try and fiddle with a system where a problem could be hardware or software related.

Mmmm... Security update.

wow same thought same time. you were just faster!
 

satty

macrumors 6502
FoxyKaye said:
I wouldn't do both at the same time. Although unlikely, in the event that something goes wrong on the system, it would be better to know if the cause is the RAM or the update. Besides, if you put both in and there's any issue, you'll wind up taking out the RAM as part of troubleshooting and having to reboot anyhow.

I'd put the RAM in first, reboot, repair permissions and make sure everything is OK. Then do the security update. I'd much rather lose "uptime" than try and fiddle with a system where a problem could be hardware or software related.

Mmmm... Security update.

I agree. Never change multiple important things at the same time.
Additional you won't loose more than 5 minutes uptime anyway, so WFC.
 

michaelrjohnson

macrumors 68020
Aug 9, 2000
2,180
5
53132
I agree with arkhanjel and FoxyKaye,
arkhanjel said:
i would probably do the ram first and reboot, this way if you have any problems with the ram you'll be sure its the ram and not the security update.

PS: Who cares about uptime? What the heck difference does it make?
spicyapple said:
...I hate to ruin my uptime, by rebooting twice...
 

reckless_0001

macrumors 6502
Sep 22, 2003
304
0
Canada
It made my system crash after reboot. No problem though. I found out it was because of an old installation of Netware I didn't completely remove. Good Ole' Logs.
 

FoxyKaye

macrumors 68000
aegisdesign said:
You win the prize for first to suggest repairing permissions. :D
LOL - you say that, but I'm always surprised by how many people simply don't. Apple certainly doesn't tell the everyday user that repairing permissions is a regular part of system maintenance.

Mitthrawnuruodo said:
Keep them coming, and make the pursuit to make some efficient malware for OS X even harder... :)
It has always been my experience that the most efficient piece of malware on OS X is the end user.
 

xsedrinam

macrumors 601
Oct 21, 2004
4,345
1
Kaye, keep repairing those permissions. After running Security Updates or any newly installed app, I always repair and run MacJanitor "por si las moscas". :)
 

Mitthrawnuruodo

Moderator emeritus
Mar 10, 2004
14,166
666
Bergen, Norway
FoxyKaye said:
It has always been my experience that the most efficient piece of malware on OS X is the end user.
He-he... I know what you mean... I've yet to see any virus or other malware do as much damage to any system as an ignorant user with admin rights, no matter what system you're talking about, Windows, Mac OS, Linux or whatever... :D
 

shawnce

macrumors 65816
Jun 1, 2004
1,442
0
FoxyKaye said:
LOL - you say that, but I'm always surprised by how many people simply don't. Apple certainly doesn't tell the everyday user that repairing permissions is a regular part of system maintenance.

Actually I think his point was that running the repair permissions tool is more vodo then any real help (in most current situations)... and that is why Apple doesn't recommend it as part of system maintenance.

review among others (because I don't care to list the reasons)

(from the above link)

Now let's see what some very silly people are saying about repairing permissions and why it is flat out wrong.

7) Repair Permissions

8) Install Mac OS X 10.x.x update

9) Repair Permissions

Ugh. This is the one that annoys me the most and the reason why I wanted to write this rant. When 10.3.9 came out, I saw this all over on just about every single Mac related website. This really boils my blood. First we have the completely bizarre suggesting of repairing permissions before installing an update. Useless. When you install a system update (or pretty much any updater using Installer.app) you are asked for your password. This makes the installer process run as root. Wrong permissions, bad permissions, no permissions, it doesn't matter. root is god. It doesn't care about what some small little file has as its permissions. It will just ignore them completely. *chortles demonically* You can't stop root. Repairing permissions won't increase the chances of the install succeeding (nor will it decrease the changes). Point nine is equally as baffling. As the installer is installing/updating files it also reset the permissions to those that will be in the receipt that the repair permissions process reads from. You just installed these files, they are going to have the correct permissions.
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.