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smirking

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Aug 31, 2003
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Does anyone out there remember Color Schemer Studio II? That was my favorite color management program. It has been a number of years since this was a usable program. It still runs (haven't upgraded to Catalina yet), but it's too unstable to use.

I've gone through a bunch of color management tools since I've had to give up Color Schemer Studio II, but none of them ever manage to match the utiility and simplicity of this little gem. I'd expect there's got to be a worthwhile alternative out there that I don't know about.

Any other fans of Color Schemer Studio II out there who've found a suitable replacement?
 

MacGizmo

macrumors 68000
Apr 27, 2003
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I don't know exactly what Color Schemer Studio did, so I can't offer any good advice. But is Adobe Color (formerly Kuler) anything like what you're looking for?

It sounds like you've tried a bunch, but here's a list - maybe there's something on it you haven't come across.
 
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smirking

macrumors 68030
Original poster
Aug 31, 2003
2,626
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Silicon Valley
I don't know exactly what Color Schemer Studio did, so I can't offer any good advice. But is Adobe Color (formerly Kuler) anything like what you're looking for?

It sounds like you've tried a bunch, but here's a list - maybe there's something on it you haven't come across.

OK! That helps! I already had gone through that AlternativesTo list and came away disappointed, but I haven't seen Adobe Color before and that is pretty much what I was looking for! I did find some references to Kuler in my search, but wasn't able to find the program. That it became Adobe Color would explain why I kept hitting dead ends.

Color Schemer Studio II was basically a Mac desktop version of Adobe Color crossed with a palette sniffing program (like Sip). It made it super easy to build and manage palettes and helped you with ideas for contrasting or complementary colors using a variety of color theory tools. Adobe Color might be pretty close.
 
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MacGizmo

macrumors 68000
Apr 27, 2003
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Adobe Color (and Kuler before it) was never a desktop app, unfortunately. The service is built-in to all of Adobe's apps, or via the website. It's not perfect, but it does the trick.

There's also:
Just Color Picker (free)
Color Slurp (free, with a pro version available)
ColorSquid ($14.99)

I wish Adobe Color came in a desktop app version, but I suppose one could be created using one of those "web app to menubar app converter" programs.
 
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D.T.

macrumors G4
Sep 15, 2011
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One of my designer buddies loves Color Slurp, I remember it from the [funny] name and seeing it during some screen share where we were doing a little iterative, OTF design changes to a project.
 
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lineengraver

macrumors newbie
Dec 3, 2018
19
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Ukraine
I've just finished Color Palette Finder for iPhone, it can edit Adobe Swatch Exchange files. I hope tomorrow will be available on the AppStore. It supports Files.app, so you can see thumbnails, QuickLook, and edit ase file just by tap on him. Kuler's ase files are editable too.
 
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MacGizmo

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Apr 27, 2003
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I've just finished Color Palette Finder for iPhone, it can edit Adobe Swatch Exchange files. I hope tomorrow will be available on the AppStore. It supports Files.app, so you can see thumbnails, QuickLook, and edit ase file just by tap on him. Kuler's ase files are editable too.
You're charging $6 for an app for the iPhone (which few designers use to do their work) that Adobe already provides for free.

I applaud the effort, but a Mac app would be more welcome.
 
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lineengraver

macrumors newbie
Dec 3, 2018
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Ukraine
You're charging $6 for an app for the iPhone (which few designers use to do their work) that Adobe already provides for free.

I applaud the effort, but a Mac app would be more welcome.

No, you are mistaken. With my app you can see thumbnails of the ase files while you browsing of directories in Files app. You can use QuickLook for the ase and you can edit ase just by tap on the file. I mean tight integration with iOS. Also, new shared folders from iOS - they are also supported.
Six dollars - it is not too much for some months of the work and free updates in the future. As to the macOS - let's start from the six bucks on the iOS.
Thank you!
 
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MacGizmo

macrumors 68000
Apr 27, 2003
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No, you are mistaken. With my app you can see thumbnails of the ase files while you browsing of directories in Files app. You can use QuickLook for the ase and you can edit ase just by tap on the file. I mean tight integration with iOS. Also, new shared folders from iOS - they are also supported.
Six dollars - it is not too much for some months of the work and free updates in the future. As to the macOS - let's start from the six bucks on the iOS.
Thank you!
No, I am NOT mistaken.

Fact: You charge $6 for your app.

Fact: The overwhelming majority of professional designers work on a desktop/laptop computer, not a phone, or even an iPad. And while most of them (I suspect almost all of them, actually) have an iPhone, it's just not used as an extension of their workflow (it's more of a supplemental thing).

Fact: With Adobe Color you can see thumbnails of the colors because it doesn't use the ASE format unless you want to transfer the ASE document (or save it for backup). They do this because they know there is little reason to have a file in ASE format to begin with, other than backup/transfer purposes where a file name is enough of an indicator of what the file is.

Fact: Because designers who want/need the colors in ASE format are already using Adobe apps, everything your app does is already built-in to the applications on the computer that they're already paying for and using. EVERY. LAST. THING.

Fact: Adobe also has multiple apps for iOS that do the same thing as your app, but sync it automatically with Adobe CC apps you have installed on your computer—thereby bypassing the need to even deal with ASE files.

Look, as I said in my original response, I applaud your effort. I really do. And no, I don't think $6 for a useful app is too much money. I think $6 is too much money when an app offers me absolutely nothing I don't already have and pay $50+ a month for and doesn't even work on the platform I use (the Mac).

Make a macOS version of this app, and add a unique feature or two and you can probably charge $15-$20.

In fact, I've got an idea for you. As a designer, I collect crap-loads of Photoshop Brush files. I used to have an app called BrushPilot that would allow me to "catalog" the brush files and show me little previews of each brush in the file. It no longer works in macOS Catalina and the developer has disappeared.

Build a modern version of that app with the ability to also preview PS pattern files and the ASE files along with the brush files and you can probably make a pretty decent amount if marketed correctly.
 
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lineengraver

macrumors newbie
Dec 3, 2018
19
6
Ukraine
No, I am NOT mistaken.

Fact: You charge $6 for your app.

Fact: The overwhelming majority of professional designers work on a desktop/laptop computer, not a phone, or even an iPad. And while most of them (I suspect almost all of them, actually) have an iPhone, it's just not used as an extension of their workflow (it's more of a supplemental thing).

Fact: With Adobe Color you can see thumbnails of the colors because it doesn't use the ASE format unless you want to transfer the ASE document (or save it for backup). They do this because they know there is little reason to have a file in ASE format to begin with, other than backup/transfer purposes where a file name is enough of an indicator of what the file is.

Fact: Because designers who want/need the colors in ASE format are already using Adobe apps, everything your app does is already built-in to the applications on the computer that they're already paying for and using. EVERY. LAST. THING.

Fact: Adobe also has multiple apps for iOS that do the same thing as your app, but sync it automatically with Adobe CC apps you have installed on your computer—thereby bypassing the need to even deal with ASE files.

Look, as I said in my original response, I applaud your effort. I really do. And no, I don't think $6 for a useful app is too much money. I think $6 is too much money when an app offers me absolutely nothing I don't already have and pay $50+ a month for and doesn't even work on the platform I use (the Mac).

Make a macOS version of this app, and add a unique feature or two and you can probably charge $15-$20.

In fact, I've got an idea for you. As a designer, I collect crap-loads of Photoshop Brush files. I used to have an app called BrushPilot that would allow me to "catalog" the brush files and show me little previews of each brush in the file. It no longer works in macOS Catalina and the developer has disappeared.

Build a modern version of that app with the ability to also preview PS pattern files and the ASE files along with the brush files and you can probably make a pretty decent amount if marketed correctly.

It is a big flame, let's make it bigger.

>You're charging $6 for an app for the iPhone...
- Actually five. One dollar taken by Apple.

>... (which few designers use to do their work)...
- Why not? Specific of the app - you can find color schema outside of the home, open ase from iCloud and share with your team for seconds.

>...that Adobe already provides for free.
- My app is quite unique, I don't know any ASE editors on iOS, macOS or win platform, free or paid. Export or import - maybe, but not to edit. It is why I said you are mistaken.

>fact: With Adobe Color you can see thumbnails of the colors because it doesn't use the ASE format unless...
- With my app you can open downloads folder on your iPhone and see or edit files downloaded from the Adobe Color. Without it - no way. It seems is convenient.

>Fact: Because designers who want/need the colors in ASE format are already using Adobe apps, everything your app does is already built-in to the applications on the computer...
>Fact: Adobe also has multiple apps for iOS that do the same thing as your app, but sync it automatically with Adobe CC apps you have installed on your computer—thereby bypassing the need to even deal with ASE files.
- Ecosystem of the Adobe. Outside of it user's can use my app and ASE. It is simple, cheaper and it is also is a standard way of the exchange.

>I think $6 is too much money when an app offers me absolutely nothing I don't already have and pay $50+ a month for and doesn't even work on the platform I use (the Mac).
- I don't understand, USD50 - it is from where? Version for the iPad makes sense, it is right and it is a future, but for macOS - I am not sure. At least I must see success or failure of the current project.

Really thank you for your time and for the idea with brushes - I will look at it but not promise.
Sorry for my English.
 
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MacGizmo

macrumors 68000
Apr 27, 2003
1,903
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Arizona
I'm not going to continue a conversation with someone who clearly has absolutely no understanding of what he/she is talking about.
 
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lineengraver

macrumors newbie
Dec 3, 2018
19
6
Ukraine
I'm not going to continue a conversation with someone who clearly has absolutely no understanding of what he/she is talking about.
I don't care. My app is intended for iPhone and it is not lack of it. And there is no any free or paid alternatives to edit ase. Good luck.
 
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Herbert123

macrumors member
Mar 19, 2009
65
50
And there is no any free or paid alternatives to edit ase.

Actually, there are:
 
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lineengraver

macrumors newbie
Dec 3, 2018
19
6
Ukraine
Actually, there are:
Please, I think you are understand that import & export not equals to edit. ASE has own structure. You can use ase file as a database of the swatches - add, delete, change category name, swatch name, color space, color type etc.
 
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Herbert123

macrumors member
Mar 19, 2009
65
50
>I think $6 is too much money when an app offers me absolutely nothing I don't already have and pay $50+ a month for and doesn't even work on the platform I use (the Mac).
- I don't understand, USD50 - it is from where? Version for the iPad makes sense, it is right and it is a future, but for macOS - I am not sure. At least I must see success or failure of the current project.

I think what he means is that ASE is an interchange format primarily used by Adobe users, and since Adobe users are already paying the rent for all the Adobe apps, and use those apps to create, edit, and exchange ASE colour palettes, the question is how relevant your app would be. Why pay for an iPhone app when you already have paid for all the Adobe tools that do the same thing integrated in those Adobe apps?

What would be the point?

And users who do not use Adobe software probably have no interest in a paid-for ASE editor that is available only on mobile devices, because their apps probably cannot import ASE files, and they will opt for something like the apps I listed: a quick conversion to a different palette format with a free desktop app.

The question is whether your app solves a hidden need - and I think that might be questionable. If your app would work on Mac, Windows, and Linux desktop as well as iOS and Android, I think it might be more useful - but only if it also converts ASE files to other colour palette file formats, and from other apps to ASE.

As it stands, the market seems awfully small. For most people not using Adobe software ASE is not that useful, because their software doesn't support it. A utility like https://www.macupdate.com/app/mac/53474/color-palette-importer is much more useful to this group of users.

Then, on the other hand, your app competes directly with Adobe tools that can already be used to create and edit ASE files. So why would Adobe users pay for your app if they already have that functionality?

See? The real question is: who is prepared to pay for a very specialized ASE colour palette editor when Adobe users have no need of it, and users outside the Adobe ecosystem mostly just want to convert ASE to something their apps can use. They will not be sharing ASE files with others, in general.

Have you done actual user research before starting work on this? I ask, because I fall in the second group of professional users who no longer use Adobe apps. When I work with colour palettes, I am not very interested in sharing or editing ASE files - only in converting them to the design apps I use now. Although once or twice in the past few years it would have been handy to have a utility like yours, but I do my work on a desktop machines (Windows and Mac), so even if I wanted to, I wouldn't be interested in your app.

My workflow would be:
1) use a tool like Adobe Kuler to browse an interesting colour palette online, and download the ASE file.
2) convert the ASE file to JASC PAL format
3) import into my design app that supports JASC PAL

All on my Windows or Mac machines. Why use a mobile app to make my life more complicated?

So, I imagine this is what many designers working outside the Adobe system would be interested in. Not in actually editing an ASE file, but merely in using it in their non-Adobe design software. But your app can't even convert ASE files to other palette file formats. So how useful would it be? Very limited.

Please, I think you are understand that import & export not equals to edit. ASE has own structure. You can use ase file as a database of the swatches - add, delete, change category name, swatch name, color space, color type etc.

True, the quesion is, however, whether users from either side of the pond (Adobe /non-Adobe users) would actually be interested in doing that. Any way, Cyotek Palette Editor is working on supporting groups in ASE files.

At least with Cyotek I can convert from one file format to another. Your app only works with ASE files.
 
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lineengraver

macrumors newbie
Dec 3, 2018
19
6
Ukraine
I think what he means is that ASE is an interchange format primarily used by Adobe users, and since Adobe users are already paying the rent for all the Adobe apps, and use those apps to create, edit, and exchange ASE colour palettes, the question is how relevant your app would be. Why pay for an iPhone app when you already have paid for all the Adobe tools that do the same thing integrated in those Adobe apps?

What would be the point?

And users who do not use Adobe software probably have no interest in a paid-for ASE editor that is available only on mobile devices, because their apps probably cannot import ASE files, and they will opt for something like the apps I listed: a quick conversion to a different palette format with a free desktop app.

The question is whether your app solves a hidden need - and I think that might be questionable. If your app would work on Mac, Windows, and Linux desktop as well as iOS and Android, I think it might be more useful - but only if it also converts ASE files to other colour palette file formats, and from other apps to ASE.

As it stands, the market seems awfully small. For most people not using Adobe software ASE is not that useful, because their software doesn't support it. A utility like https://www.macupdate.com/app/mac/53474/color-palette-importer is much more useful to this group of users.

Then, on the other hand, your app competes directly with Adobe tools that can already be used to create and edit ASE files. So why would Adobe users pay for your app if they already have that functionality?

See? The real question is: who is prepared to pay for a very specialized ASE colour palette editor when Adobe users have no need of it, and users outside the Adobe ecosystem mostly just want to convert ASE to something their apps can use. They will not be sharing ASE files with others, in general.

Have you done actual user research before starting work on this? I ask, because I fall in the second group of professional users who no longer use Adobe apps. When I work with colour palettes, I am not very interested in sharing or editing ASE files - only in converting them to the design apps I use now. Although once or twice in the past few years it would have been handy to have a utility like yours, but I do my work on a desktop machines (Windows and Mac), so even if I wanted to, I wouldn't be interested in your app.

My workflow would be:
1) use a tool like Adobe Kuler to browse an interesting colour palette online, and download the ASE file.
2) convert the ASE file to JASC PAL format
3) import into my design app that supports JASC PAL

All on my Windows or Mac machines. Why use a mobile app to make my life more complicated?

So, I imagine this is what many designers working outside the Adobe system would be interested in. Not in actually editing an ASE file, but merely in using it in their non-Adobe design software. But your app can't even convert ASE files to other palette file formats. So how useful would it be? Very limited.



True, the quesion is, however, whether users from either side of the pond (Adobe /non-Adobe users) would actually be interested in doing that. Any way, Cyotek Palette Editor is working on supporting groups in ASE files.

At least with Cyotek I can convert from one file format to another. Your app only works with ASE files.

Can we forget for a five minutes about Adobe? Let us to look from another side. We can find tons of the apps on App Store to play with the colors. For example quite popular PocketPalette
Users of it may be designers and may be not. They are already exists.

My app is not different, nothing original except of:

1. It is based on a standard Adobe's format for colors exchange. User can create as many databases as he want, place where he want and even open from the professional designer's packages. Good addition.
2. Integration to the operation system. Thumbnails, fast preview, edit by tap - is it bad?

Can be my app popular? If it will be created also for iPadOS and macOS as an universal app - maybe. Can be added support of drag&drop UIColor, split screen, support of import and export of other formats, AR 3D preview, search etc. Such professional color picker is needed for iPad Pro, I am sure.

Thank you for the conversation and good points. If my app will be popular I will write export to JASC PAL :)
Or you can use python script
 
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lineengraver

macrumors newbie
Dec 3, 2018
19
6
Ukraine
Just released version for iPad. Some other features - support of different palettes, import and export, - aco (Adobe Photoshop), gpl (GIMP), swatches (Procreate).
 
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msavin5

macrumors newbie
Apr 30, 2021
1
0
NYC

Does anyone out there remember Color Schemer Studio II? That was my favorite color management program. It has been a number of years since this was a usable program. It still runs (haven't upgraded to Catalina yet), but it's too unstable to use.

I've gone through a bunch of color management tools since I've had to give up Color Schemer Studio II, but none of them ever manage to match the utiility and simplicity of this little gem. I'd expect there's got to be a worthwhile alternative out there that I don't know about.

Any other fans of Color Schemer Studio II out there who've found a suitable replacement?

I couldn't find a good replacement for Color Schemer either so I ended up building one! It's called Paletter, and there is a free as well as a paid version available. I would be happy to send you a free voucher if you would like to give a review :)

Edit: a quick preview of Paletter:

Screen Shot 2021-05-01 at 6.23.46 PM.png
 
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