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wrsni

macrumors member
Original poster
Nov 20, 2020
40
16
First post, and OK, this section is for confirmed Appleists but it's all related.

I'm done with Windows, been using it since 95, even have a Windows phone, but I'm done. Have two pretty old Dell laptops both now on Linux, which I quite like, Windows phone rolled back to 8:1 which is doing OK for now but plainly this is not a sustainable situation regarding hardware. Google not an option, so going forward I need to look at Apple.

Also my accounting year ends at the end of this month and there's a wee bit of money in the kitty and it would benefit me to make a hardware purchase.

But what a crazy time to be considering your first Apple purchase! New (revolutionary?) hardware, new operating system, all this chat about even better to come, and probably soon, head fried!

I've been through everything from a basic air to dip a toe in the water, to a maxed out Pro that would hopefully do me for a while. Even dable with the idea of a Mini but have only used laptops this past dozen or more years so have no peripherals and would have to buy all that. Yes, the price difference of the Mini will facilitate that but what if I don't like going back to the desktop like scenario and end up having to buy another laptop anyway?

But also what if I don't get the Apple thing? It seems to be something that requires 'buy in' but I guess I'm not going to figure that out without trying it.

However that then brings me to the side of things relative to here. The 'toe in the water' scenario would suggest basic 'over-the-counter' spec for whatever I buy. But, I don't buy tech for the sake of it and if it was doing OK I'd be keeping it until worn out essentially, so I've always bought my computer stuff with a bit extra over standard as it definitely tends to keep something more usable for longer. So the big question with these new M1 machines for me is the RAM, are they configured in a way that the extra RAM is needed or is ever likely to be? It also makes the difference between me being able to get one locally within half an hour or having to order it through Apple. The only heavy load I'd be giving it is video editing, but that is quite a load in itself. I live in Northern Ireland but our eldest lives in Florida and I shoot 4k footage with a drone which has to be cut and shrunk to send to him or uploaded for him to view. Other than that just browsing and watching media, the old laptops are still well capable of doing everything else.

Sorry for the length of the post, but I feel the quality of the question is often reflected in the quality of the answer and I really do need some outside info to try and nail down an answer in the next few days.

Thanks in advance for any and all suggestions.
 
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hefeglass

macrumors 6502a
Apr 21, 2009
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UltimateSyn

macrumors 601
Mar 3, 2008
4,159
6,818
Massachusetts
It’s a nice, cohesive, fluid ecosystem where the UX translates across all of your devices. There are keynotes available on Apple’s website for the things you’re asking about. I’d say they’re pretty good marketers if you want to be sold something.

Their WWDC keynote from June introduced Big Sur and the idea of Apple Silicon, then their November event introduced all the M1 Macs.

Alternatively, you can watch a multitide of video reviews of the M1 Macs where nearly everybody is raving about them. The Verge did a good review, here is their Air/Pro video:

And here is a fantastic piece by John Gruber on the M1 Macs. He specifically touches on RAM usage and the 16GB cap you’re afraid of. I believe this thinkpiece will best answer your question and entice you to buy them: https://daringfireball.net/2020/11/the_m1_macs
 
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JohnnyGo

macrumors 6502a
Sep 9, 2009
951
612
Best timing to quit Windows is now!

Office on Mac is almost identical to Windows and has a beta out for M1

M1 laptops are incredible. Performance out of this world. Best in class battery life (very similar to iPad and far better than laptops). Average users and tech reviewers all agree that even a $999 base M1 MacBook Air will blow your mind!

Apple has the resources (technical and financial) to continue to invest heavily into wearables and computers and everything in between.

Integration inside the Apple ecosystem is also a BIG plus. Even an Apple Watch has multiple use cases if you’re an user o iPhone + iPad or iPhone + MacBook. AirPods are a delight to use.

What are you waiting for???
 

4sallypat

macrumors 68020
Sep 16, 2016
2,444
2,115
So Calif
For video editing, look at the M1 Mini.
It can run dual displays.

16GB is more than adequate due to the "Unified Memory" architecture that differs from your standard Windows machines and Intel Macs that uses industry standard DDR RAM.

My base M1 Mini (8GB) runs circles around my Intel Macs.
It works as if it has double the RAM of my 2012 i7 quad core Mini w/ 16GB.
 
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wrsni

macrumors member
Original poster
Nov 20, 2020
40
16
Thanks for all replies so far.

Just to clarify, my issue with memory isn't the 16GB limit, it's whether it's actually worth spending the extra for the 16 over the eight irrespective of which individual model you would go for. Plainly this first M1 is a base model with physical limitations such as ports and graphics, the money for the extra 8GB of Ram would go a fair bit towards buying me an external monitor for example. Against that, if it was the best way to go then I'd stomp up the cash and wait for it from Apple.

Also apart from the money, I could buy an 8GB model locally and have it within half an hour if I wanted it.

I'm heading towards the Pro (I think!), better inbuilt speakers and no throttling for video editing but maybe a 16GB Air would be a better buy than 8GB Pro all other things being equal.

Appleists are struggling with these decisions yet I've never owned an Apple product in my life!
 

marc55

macrumors 6502a
Oct 14, 2011
871
216
I switched over to MacBook when I retired in 2011, and haven't looked back.

My MB current is a 2017 MBP, 16GB Ram, 500GB SSD, and she still turns and burns.

I am looking at the new M1 MBP, and when I finally upgrade it will be the MBP, 16GB Ram, 500GB SSD; I just like having the extra capability, and know I won't run into any issues.

Best of luck!
 

crawfish963

macrumors 6502a
Apr 16, 2010
871
1,399
Texas
Thanks for all replies so far.

Just to clarify, my issue with memory isn't the 16GB limit, it's whether it's actually worth spending the extra for the 16 over the eight irrespective of which individual model you would go for. Plainly this first M1 is a base model with physical limitations such as ports and graphics, the money for the extra 8GB of Ram would go a fair bit towards buying me an external monitor for example. Against that, if it was the best way to go then I'd stomp up the cash and wait for it from Apple.

Also apart from the money, I could buy an 8GB model locally and have it within half an hour if I wanted it.

I'm heading towards the Pro (I think!), better inbuilt speakers and no throttling for video editing but maybe a 16GB Air would be a better buy than 8GB Pro all other things being equal.

Appleists are struggling with these decisions yet I've never owned an Apple product in my life!
Depends on your use case, but I am finding 8 to be more than sufficient for my needs. Be careful, once you dive into the ecosystem you will have a hard time getting out! We have 2 Apple TVs in the house, 5 iPads, 4 iPhones, 2 MacBooks, an iMac, 3 Apple watches, and 3 sets of AirPods. Some of the speakers are on the way too.
 

Bandaman

Cancelled
Aug 28, 2019
2,005
4,072
Thanks for all replies so far.

Just to clarify, my issue with memory isn't the 16GB limit, it's whether it's actually worth spending the extra for the 16 over the eight irrespective of which individual model you would go for. Plainly this first M1 is a base model with physical limitations such as ports and graphics, the money for the extra 8GB of Ram would go a fair bit towards buying me an external monitor for example. Against that, if it was the best way to go then I'd stomp up the cash and wait for it from Apple.

Also apart from the money, I could buy an 8GB model locally and have it within half an hour if I wanted it.

I'm heading towards the Pro (I think!), better inbuilt speakers and no throttling for video editing but maybe a 16GB Air would be a better buy than 8GB Pro all other things being equal.

Appleists are struggling with these decisions yet I've never owned an Apple product in my life!
8 sucks for video editing (and in general IMO). Get 16.
 

4sallypat

macrumors 68020
Sep 16, 2016
2,444
2,115
So Calif
Depends on your use case, but I am finding 8 to be more than sufficient for my needs. Be careful, once you dive into the ecosystem you will have a hard time getting out! We have 2 Apple TVs in the house, 5 iPads, 4 iPhones, 2 MacBooks, an iMac, 3 Apple watches, and 3 sets of AirPods. Some of the speakers are on the way too.
Agreed, the Apple ecosystem is very addicting.

All we use are Apple products in the house.
I have way too many Macbook laptops (12", 13", 15", 16") so this time for the M1 I got a base Mini with 8GB to replace an aging 2012 Intel Mini.

Love the 8GB M1 Mini - it runs everything super quick (no video editing) with no lags.
Bonus is that it's quiet (no fan noise) and so cool to the touch that I don't need to have a laptop cooling fan underneath it anymore!
 

cmhsam

macrumors 6502
Jul 14, 2008
448
70
If you have to be sold on MAC, Big Sur, or Apple then it sounds like you will regret once you make the move. Should be easy for you if you really want to make the move.
 

wrsni

macrumors member
Original poster
Nov 20, 2020
40
16
Love the 8GB M1 Mini - it runs everything super quick (no video editing) with no lags.
Bonus is that it's quiet (no fan noise) and so cool to the touch that I don't need to have a laptop cooling fan underneath it anymore!
What I'm thinking is that the Pro is essentially the same except that I can add an external monitor and mouse in due course rather than needing them from the get go. Then if I find myself doing more desk work a Mini would be the next upgrade, if not then just work on. If there was a performance advantage with the Mini rather than just a cost advantage that would be different but as it is the Pro and Mini are, it appears, pretty much on a par.

Also, while I'm not a traveler, the portability of the Macbook appeals even from a room to room perspective and being able to use it as much as possible to familiarise myself with something completely different.

Strikes me from reading here that most people buying Minis already have a Macbook of some description, few seem to buy one as their only Mac.
 

Strangedream

macrumors 6502a
Sep 15, 2019
661
545
London, UK
IMHO Windows was pretty good up to the mid-2000s but after Vista MS completely lost it. Their software are marred with bugs and issues, everything is very messy, even outlook requires you to enter your password several times a day ...

On the other hand Apple software/hardware, while far from perfect, are very well thought and less frustrating to use. The new M1 (while I can't talk for myself because I ain't got one) does seem to make everything you do even more fluid.
 

wrsni

macrumors member
Original poster
Nov 20, 2020
40
16
If you have to be sold on MAC, Big Sur, or Apple then it sounds like you will regret once you make the move. Should be easy for you if you really want to make the move.
I'm not a techy person, I only have this stuff for what it can do for me.

Google is not an option, and I have become very disillusioned with Windows recently so I feel I have to try Apple.

However, a less tumultuous time for the brand would probably have been simpler!

Furthermore, if I make the jump i'll be sticking with it for a significant time and giving it a good chance.

There'll be no knee-jerk reactions.
 
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tdar

macrumors 65816
Jun 23, 2003
1,479
1,116
Alpharetta GA.
Question, how do you know if you're on the M1 beta. I switched my auto-update to the beta track. Currently on version 16.44 (20111502).
.44 is the beta. Like all apps right click on the app icon and select get info. It will tell you the type of app. The office apps will say universal.
 

wrsni

macrumors member
Original poster
Nov 20, 2020
40
16
I switched over to MacBook when I retired in 2011, and haven't looked back.

My MB current is a 2017 MBP, 16GB Ram, 500GB SSD, and she still turns and burns.

I am looking at the new M1 MBP, and when I finally upgrade it will be the MBP, 16GB Ram, 500GB SSD; I just like having the extra capability, and know I won't run into any issues.

Best of luck!
Thank you.

Maybe I'll be typing a similar reply to someone in three or four years time!
 

pshufd

macrumors 604
Oct 24, 2013
7,855
13,114
New Hampshire
I built a new Windows desktop two months ago because I was so frustrated with the thermals on Apple's products and was on the fence about buying a Mac Pro. And then they release the M1. And I'd really like one but I need something that can drive 3 (at least) 4k monitors. I could get two Minis to run my workload. I'm using 26 GB of RAM on my Windows system right now so I'm probably someone that could definitely use the 16 GB model but I would feel more comfortable with 32 GB.

I was all-Apple a year ago - getting it done with two MacBook Pros running in conjunction. But they got warm to hot when they ran.

So this is a great time to go all-Apple. You take some risks with new hardware and new software of course. But you are far from alone. I usually buy the model and take some time to verify that my applications will run on the new platform and this can take a while. I just really don't like the idea of getting an 8 GB model and finding that it isn't sufficient for my needs.

One of my applications is setup to use 12 GB of RAM. It uses much less in practice but I plan to do a lot more with this application and want room for growth.
 

wrsni

macrumors member
Original poster
Nov 20, 2020
40
16
Depends on your use case, but I am finding 8 to be more than sufficient for my needs. Be careful, once you dive into the ecosystem you will have a hard time getting out! We have 2 Apple TVs in the house, 5 iPads, 4 iPhones, 2 MacBooks, an iMac, 3 Apple watches, and 3 sets of AirPods. Some of the speakers are on the way too.
I can't imagine that to be the case, our 'tech' tends to be purposeful rather than aspirational.

However, I do tend to stick with products which do well and give little hassle and always look in the same direction when I need something. Therefore it has always without exception been Dell computers and Microsoft.

This potential change is the first time I've looked elsewhere since my first desktop 25 odd yrs ago, so it's quite a significant thing.
 

tdar

macrumors 65816
Jun 23, 2003
1,479
1,116
Alpharetta GA.
To the OP, it sounds like you are a laptop person, so the best choice is the MacBook Pro. It and the mini have almost identical performance. The very best choice would be a 512gb with 16 gb of ram. If budget requires a lower cost, then I would go with a 256 with 16gb of ram. One thing that you will find is it’s hard to kill a Mac. I have a 2004 original mini and it still works as well as the day I got it. So one should plan for a long life and get the highest capacity that they can afford.
 

mr_jomo

macrumors 6502
Dec 9, 2018
294
367
I'm not a techy person, I only have this stuff for what it can do for me.

Google is not an option, and I have become very disillusioned with Windows recently so I feel I have to try Apple.

However, a less tumultuous time for the brand would probably have been simpler!
I think you'll be switching at possible the least tumultuous time in years for Apple: new macs are build on proven platforms through and through (both components and cpus) and are now best-in-class notebooks; Big Sur has just taken macos a huge leap forward and will be stable for a while; iPhones are in their 3-4 fourth design re-use so carry very little risk. iPads are solid design-wise on a good plateau for iPadOS.
 
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pshufd

macrumors 604
Oct 24, 2013
7,855
13,114
New Hampshire
I think you'll be switching at possible the least tumultuous time in years for Apple: new macs are build on proven platforms through and through (both components and cpus) and are now best-in-class notebooks; Big Sur has just taken macos a huge leap forward and will be stable for a while; iPhones are in their 3-4 fourth design re-use so carry very little risk. iPads are solid design-wise on a good plateau for iPadOS.

Apple really wants this to work and I think that they will be bending over backwards to resolve the problems. I am quite excited over these changes.
 
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bbates123

macrumors 6502a
Jul 2, 2010
780
676
.44 is the beta. Like all apps right click on the app icon and select get info. It will tell you the type of app. The office apps will say universal.
Huh, I didn't know that. Thanks for the tip!
 

jido

macrumors regular
Oct 11, 2010
226
99
As a switcher, I would go for the cheapest option that suits my needs.

You will have a better idea of your precise needs after some time using it.

Sure, you can future-proof your purchase but how will you feel about it in one year's time?

You don't know at this point yet.

If the computer is not powerful enough, you can resell it and get a higher spec one. Used Mac computers sell for good price.
 
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