Price Advice Selling maxed out Mid 2012 15" cMBP Need Price advice

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by Yebubbleman, Nov 20, 2014.

  1. Yebubbleman macrumors 68030

    Yebubbleman

    Joined:
    May 20, 2010
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #1
    I'm to be selling a 15" Mid 2012 15" MacBook Pro (non-retina) with the following specs. This is a friend's MacBook Pro (not the one I own and list in my signature) and I'm doing this as a favor for him. It has the following specs:

    - 2.7GHz Quad-Core Intel Core i7 "Ivy Bridge" CPU (with 8MB L3 Cache)
    - High-Res Anti-Glare LCD screen (1680x1050 native resolution)
    - 16GB PC3-12800 1600MHz DDR3 RAM
    - NVIDIA GeForce GT 650M with 1GB of GDDR5 VRAM
    - Intel HD 4000
    - 750GB Hard Drive (Installed in an OptiBay kit)
    - 480GB Solid State Drive (Installed in Hard Drive Bay)
    - 1 year left on AppleCare
    - Including just the machine and the original 85-watt MagSafe Adapter

    I currently have it up on Craigslist for $2100. Is this realistic? Is it worth more or less than that, you think?
     
  2. MacInTO macrumors 65816

    MacInTO

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2005
    Location:
    Canada, eh!
    #2
    It sounds like a lot and I would think a bit less. You can always check eBay for the going rate what what they have sold for recently.

    However, this is the last of the 15" anti-glare, upgradeable machines, and many people prefer this over the retina models, so you might be able to get close to the asking price.

    Do you know what this machine went for when it was new?
     
  3. Naimfan macrumors 601

    Naimfan

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2003
    #3
    You are probably better off taking out the SSD and restoring the optical drive.

    From looking at eBay "sold" listings, $2100 is far too high - $1300-1400 seems more realistic. While a great machine, it is now 2.5 years from release and being a non-retina hurts.

    If you look around, you can find new model top-line retinas for right around $2100. Granted, they don't have the storage of yours, but they're faster, with a better screen, more modern, much better battery life, lighter, etc.
     
  4. Yebubbleman thread starter macrumors 68030

    Yebubbleman

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    May 20, 2010
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #4
    The machine, before the OptiBay Upgrade went for just under $3000 when it was new. The SSD is still worth about $400 new. Bear in mind, this has the 2.7GHz with the 8MB L3 Cache processor option, which was originally $200 more than the 2.6GHz (with 6MB L3 Cache) processor.

    Does the 2.7GHz Processor with 8MB L3 Cache not amount to anything?
     
  5. MacInTO macrumors 65816

    MacInTO

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2005
    Location:
    Canada, eh!
    #5
    The Apple rebuff store just released some more MBP models. The 2.7 i7 from early 2013 is going for $1900. This is essentially the same as your machine, but with a retina display and no optical drive. It indicated the original retail price was $2800.

    I'd say Naimfan is correct. It's probably best to return it to stock and try to sell it. The value of your machine is less than the one on Apple, plus there is only an option for one year of your remaining warranty where the refurb models you can still add two years of Applecare.

    http://store.apple.com/us/product/F...-27ghz-Quad-core-Intel-i7-with-retina-Display
     
  6. Naimfan macrumors 601

    Naimfan

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2003
    #6
    A 500 GB Samsung Evo 840 is about $220, a Pro is only $280, so not sure a 480 GB SSD is worth $400.

    The 2.7 i7 is fine but does not support a significantly higher price. As I wrote, it's still a 2.5 year old design and the lack of a retina screen hurts, as does the general perception that it is heavy, etc.
     
  7. Cubytus macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
    #7
    It will eventually come down to buyer's preferences. You could keep the upgrades you made available for a fee, but otherwise restore the machine to its factory specs. For example, not having an ISO keyboard or SL compatibility would be a deal-breaker for me, but wouldn't for many people.

    Traditionally, any upgrade made after purchase seems undervalued by buyers.
     
  8. blooperz macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2013
    #8
    It could have been $5000 brand new...I still doubt you would get anywhere near 2k for it today, theres just no reason to not get the latest model for that price. Everything depreciates and technology especially so ...in a world where even 1 year old technology has people looking for what's next...tech just moves so fast now :S
     
  9. Yebubbleman thread starter macrumors 68030

    Yebubbleman

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    May 20, 2010
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #9
    Given the present lack of software that supports Retina, I'd imagine that a retina screen is only clamored by only the most diehard of the diehards at the moment. For anyone clinging to FCP7, a retina wouldn't suffice, for instance.

    I wouldn't think the 2.7 i7 supports that much higher of a price. But like you said, $400 for the SSD, subtract that from $2100 and you get $1700. Let's say that the stock 2.6GHz model is worth $1600; that then checks out. No?

    The owner feels that this will more be geared for someone who will use this machine for production. Ivy Bridge is only one generation of underlying processor technology from what is being sold currently. The GeForce GT 650M with 1GB of VRAM is two generations older than what NVIDIA currently makes for laptops, but only one generation older than the GeForce GT 750M in the higher-end 15" MacBook Pros of current and on par (if not slightly slower than) the Intel Iris Pro in the lower-end 15' MacBook Pro of current.

    First off, Haswell has been out for nearly two years now. Previously processor tech refreshed annually. So, no, tech is NOT moving so fast now. The MacBook Pro you can buy today is only marginally different from the MacBook Pro you could buy a year ago. If you're trying to tell me that people don't understand that, maybe you're right. But to tell me that a machine that is two years old (but only one generation of internal hardware behind what is actually being sold currently) is SOOOOOOO old, is neither true nor fair.
     
  10. Naimfan macrumors 601

    Naimfan

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2003
    #10
    Of course, the 2.6 is not worth $1600 - more like $1200. Add in some value, but definitely not retail, for the RAM and SSD, and it's worth $1300-1400.

    With used retina models with 16 GB/512 GB starting to sell in volume for around $1500, a non-retina is difficult to justify at or above that, regardless of configuration.
     
  11. keysofanxiety macrumors 604

    keysofanxiety

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    #11
    Look, it's still a very good, capable machine. But even with all of the upgrades you're going to get nowhere near $2000. There's just not the demand for it and it is outdated. This is the truth I'm afraid. Macs depreciate extremely quickly, contrary to popular belief.

    At the moment it looks like you're refuting people's points until you find a poster who will agree with you. That's not going to happen.

    And if the owner thinks it's such a good machine, why does he want to sell it? So he can buy the Retina?
     
  12. Spink10 Suspended

    Spink10

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2011
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    #12
    I have the 2.7, Hi-Res Anti Glare, 8GB RAM, 1TB HD - blah blah - 7 Months AppleCare - same machine as yours except for the RAM, SSD, little AppleCare. Mine has been posted in CL for $1300 for 30 days in a market of 1 Million+ people - no real bits - best offer is like $1000. I wont sell for less than $1200 - my need to go to eBay.
     
  13. fr4c macrumors 65816

    fr4c

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    Jul 27, 2007
    Location:
    Hamster wheel
    #13
    Only worth what people are willing to pay in the used market, regardless of how much you think it may be worth compared to whats available now. I think realistically you're looking at around $1500 max on that machine with the upgrades included. Any more and people can get rMBPs.
     
  14. Cubytus macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2007
    #14
    Maybe recent Macs do. But depreciation was found to be historically slow. I sold a 2009 MB (metal unibody) in 2011 for $700, paid $1500, and had a physically broken but working trackpad. Comparatively, I sold an unopened $650 PC laptop from 2012 in the same year for $400. Which one lost the most value?

    Assuming it's not a stolen one, any reason for him wanting to sell would be acceptable. I am not here to judge the OP.

    eBay? Do you really enjoy receiving so many scam attempts or just get ripped off by shady buyers?

    On the other hand, if the offers are so low, maybe you have too much competition, or live in a poor city.

    I would take a faster machine without Retina. But clearly people don't seem too concerned about power on the used market.
     
  15. Yebubbleman thread starter macrumors 68030

    Yebubbleman

    Joined:
    May 20, 2010
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #15
    The owner wants to sell it so he can buy a refurbished 27" iMac either of the Late 2012 variety or of the Late 2013 (current non-retina) variety.

    Macs, at least in my experience in selling them, don't depreciate that quickly. Six months ago, I could've gotten $1000 for a lower-end Mid 2010 17" MacBook Pro (i.e. the only model that ever had any flavor of Core i5). The only thing that would have anyone feeling like the machine is outdated is the lack of a retina display, which few consumers even are apt to appreciate or even know the difference. You'd be surprised by how many people I've explained the difference to (and still don't get it).

    In any event, as it was when Apple sold the customization option brand new, the 2.7GHz Ivy Bridge i7 with 8MB of L3 Cache option was geared at people who use their MacBook Pro for production; more a tool than a Facebooking machine. The seller seems convinced that it is that same target audience that will want this machine. Especially since there are a lot of common tools that Pros STILL use that either still lack retina display support or will never get retina display support. Similarly, many creatives still use drive bays. Having a laptop that can essentially have a 1.25TB Fusion Drive is also fairly useful (especially when, unlike Apple-supplied Fusion Drives, the SSD portion is larger than 128GB).

    I told him that eBay is probably where he should go next. We'll try to exhaust some other avenues first, but yeah, that's seeming like the best bet. A shame that they now, in addition to the listing fee, take 10% of your winnings.

    Yes, but there are functional differences between rMBPs and cMBPs that prompted those that could've gotten the former in 2012 to instead get the latter. I am one such person myself (and no, again, I'm not selling my machine). Also, the speed differences between Haswell and Ivy Bridge, especially when Apple doesn't offer a 15" rMBP with a Haswell/Crystalwell processor that has 8MB of Cache.

    Also, many of the pro users are not yet jumping on Yosemite and are usually one or two releases of OS X behind. You cannot run Mountain Lion on a Haswell based MacBook Pro at all and that's often critical in some production environments. For consumers, yes, this won't be an issue. But then again, as stated before, consumers wouldn't appreciate the opti-bay and the fact that there is both a 7200RPM 750GB hard drive and a 480GB SSD.

    People on this site tend to have opinions that gravitate toward the newest and the best, regardless of anything beyond that. The differences between the non-retina 15" from 2012 and the retina from 2012 and early 2013 are minimal (it's just a design changeover that mostly sucked anyway). Even the differences between that same non-retina 15" and the CURRENT 15" MacBook Pro of current aren't that pronounced. Plus GeForce GT 650M is still better than Intel Iris Pro for the lower-end MacBook Pro, which is where most of this thread's comparisons are going towards anyway.
     
  16. keysofanxiety macrumors 604

    keysofanxiety

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    #16
    You ask for selling/price advice. We tell you that the 2012 MBPs don't go for anywhere near what they used to (which they don't), and you're spending your time refuting everything we said, trying to convince yourself that it's worth more money than it is, and using terms like 'the seller believes' (which doesn't mean jack).

    For better or for worse, for fair or unfair, these computers won't go for anywhere near the price the buyer is expecting. Argue the toss all you want, but that's the truth. Yes, it's a capable machine - I have one and I absolutely love it. But with the retina models having been out for so long, and the used market for retinas being as cheap as they are, it's not going to happen.

    Everybody here is very experienced with the used market and we're not coming from a standpoint of 'I wouldn't buy it', we're coming from a standpoint of 'nobody will pay that price for that machine'. Why ask MR for price advice if you're not going to listen to anybody.

    £1150 for it, absolute tops.
     
  17. Santabean2000 macrumors 68000

    Santabean2000

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    #17
    True, but not in the Apple world so much. I sold my 4½ yr old iMac for more than 50% of it's retail price (although I had bumped the RAM). Mac minis hold their value even more, I got ⅔ of the retail price of mine just under 3yrs old. iPhones, same story - still get a lot.

    In saying all that, I do think your asking too much. I just bought a 2012 15" MBP for $750 (albeit the base model). I did think that a bargain though.

    I just sold my 13" 2012 MBP with similar upgrades - extra RAM, dual drive (SSD + HDD) for the same price. Also included 2 chargers. [Selling to a friend; could maybe have got more if I had the time and energy.]
     
  18. tillsbury macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2007
    #18
    You're concentrating on the major specs and forgetting some other issues that are relevant with retina MBPs (apart from the fact that Retina was freaky two and a bit years ago but now is considered normal). For example, later rMBPs support not only Thunderbolt 2 but also external 4k monitors, which is a significant matter for someone buying a powerful notebook. Do you really expect people to pay that much for a second-hand laptop and be stuck with a low-resolution external monitor too? This is a high-end laptop that doesn't even have an HD resolution screen, which is very unusual nowadays.

    For a machine about two and a half years old, there are two prices you can compare it against. One is the price of the closest specified current model (difficult, as there isn't one), and the other is the price of a refurbished identical model. With current models I found both of these to be about 33% discount on the original price 30 months ago. The top value of a second-hand pristine example is around 25% below this price.

    You would have to take a little below this to reflect it being a discontinued model and not retina. This assumes you return it to stock and sell it mint in original box as it was originally delivered.
     
  19. RedCroissant Suspended

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2011
    #19
    I personally think that it is realistic and fair. I am incredibly jealous and wish that I could afford to buy that off of you.

    The current 13" MBP with a dual i5, 4GB RAM, and a 500GB HDD is selling for $1,049. So a Quad core i7 (albeit a slightly older CPU), 16GB RAM, Dual HDDs and a year left on AC is an amazing deal. Plus, all it takes is a simple edit and you can make that MBP recognize the external superdrive as well ( I did it with a Mac Mini core Solo). It also mirrors the display through an Apple TV, has great WiFi (not AC but still great) it's powerful enough to use with Virtual machine software....etc. That is a great machine and I would love to have it.
     

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