iPhone Send iMessages from my AT&T # while abroad w\ Foreign SIM Card?

Discussion in 'iOS 7' started by shenan1982, Oct 12, 2013.

  1. shenan1982 macrumors 68040

    shenan1982

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    #1
    I'm interested in sending iMessages from my iPhone while I'm abroad, but from my AT&T phone number, not the foreign SIM card's number. Seems when I put the SIM in, it doesn't allow me to send from my phone number on my ATT account.

    This seems odd since during this time I can still send\receive iMessages from my Mac using Messages and my ATT phone number, as well as with my iPad, sending and receiving via my ATT phone number.

    Is this even possible?
     
  2. squeakr macrumors 68000

    squeakr

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2010
    #2
    Have you tried it with the iPhone only on wifi and cellular off, so the setup would be the same as with the Mac. I know this is not an ideal situation but may be what is needed as the way the cellular radio works in conjunction with the iPhone.
     
  3. shenan1982 thread starter macrumors 68040

    shenan1982

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    Nov 23, 2011
    #3
    No, haven't tried that. Should I be signing in with my AppleID to iMessages?

    So strange the identical setup, even when on cellular on the iPad allows for selection of my phone number.
     
  4. squeakr macrumors 68000

    squeakr

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    Apr 22, 2010
    #4
    Are you using a different sim on the iPad as well or the original AT&T sim.
     
  5. shenan1982 thread starter macrumors 68040

    shenan1982

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    Nov 23, 2011
    #5
    Using a different AT&T data-only sim
     
  6. squeakr macrumors 68000

    squeakr

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    Apr 22, 2010
    #6
    So it is not the same setup. It is using the number from the AT&T sim that is was originally set up with. Other than the suggestions I have set up, I would not know of any other way possible. You oils just set the phone to use your Apple ID to send instead of your number, but then everyone would probably have to converse using that instead of your number (which they may already be used to). Or use tour original sim and pay international fees.
     
  7. SrgtKickAss macrumors newbie

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    Jul 2, 2013
    #7
    What you COULD do, although a pain in the ass would be to remote desktop into your mac at home, and use iMessage on there :)
     
  8. shenan1982 thread starter macrumors 68040

    shenan1982

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    Nov 23, 2011
    #8
    Yeah, was just trying to consolidate into one number. I don't really want to go with the AppleID thing, that's a pain. When I get an iMessage from someone's AppleID it feels kinda ghetto to me, like they didn't pay their cell bill so they have to use the AppleID over wifi.
     
  9. squeakr macrumors 68000

    squeakr

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    Apr 22, 2010
    #9
    You'll change that tune when you have kids, perfectly functioning iDevices and no need to spend an extra $100-200 a month so they can FaceTime and iMessage their friends and other family. Also if you add the Apple ID email to their contact info it will only show their name and not feel so abnormal or "ghetto".
     
  10. shenan1982 thread starter macrumors 68040

    shenan1982

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    Nov 23, 2011
    #10
    I guess, tho I'd have to have a lot of kids to add up to an extra $100-200 a month (that's 3-6 extra MobileShare add-on lines... 2 kids = 1 too many IMO).

    So you're saying you have kids where they have an iPhone that doesn't have cellular service? Wouldn't a parent want their kid to have a device with phone service for emergencies as a priority over being able to iMessage and FaceTime with their friends? I guess I'm just missing the justification of the setup here.

    ----------

    Hmm... I suppose that would be a roundabout way to do it. LOL

    But if I had a computer to remote in, wouldn't I just iMessage from there? hehe
     
  11. squeakr macrumors 68000

    squeakr

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    Apr 22, 2010
    #11
    Any phone has 911 service. By law they have to be allowed to call 911 for free and can't be denied that so no problem there.

    Yes I have kids and we have no need for extra phones (no justifications here, I have just found a work around to reuse older devices with added value to the kids as they wanted iPods anyway and now they have them just with more functionality). If they need to make an actual call they can use one of the VOIPs in the house or the other cell phones. My wife and I are on grandfathered unlimited plans which I am holding onto until they make me change (so I would have data plans on each as well). My kids are not old enough to merit or need cell phones but can use message, FaceTime, which includes FaceTime audio in ios 7 to their hearts content. I had extra devices left over from upgrades so why not let them have a glorified iPod? They have games, music, and as a bonus, communication, all in one handy device. As to the extra cost, even with a shared data plan, the bare minimum is $35 + taxes a line to get them full phone service.

    I appreciate the concern for my children, but they have 911 access, and better than 90% of iPhone functionality without the added cost. I am old enough to remember one house phone and no 911 and survived, so I don't really see the worry. They aren't out wandering the streets alone nor driving anywhere so they always have a cell within reach. Until this changes their is no need for extra devices or expenses. I can also put a prepaid phone out there for them with minutes only for the emergencies (and since they call so infrequently the minutes would last a long time). Families are expensive and cuts where things aren't necessary sometimes has to be made. In fact my kids and their friends only having streaming shows and over the air (yes no cable) and they don't complain or feel they are missing a thing (including a phone, happy with their situation).
     
  12. shenan1982 thread starter macrumors 68040

    shenan1982

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    Nov 23, 2011
    #12
    Unfortunately it doesn't work. If I hot-swap the sim from my AT&T to a T-Mobile Sim, the network connect, then it shows "Send From" and I select my AT&T number. When I try to send a new iMessage it fails. I then turn off then back on iMessage using the toggle, and the AT&T number disappears.

    This is precisely as I though, so unless someone knows a workaround, it's not possible to replace the sim with a different carriers' sim and then initiate a new conversation from a different iMessage phone number.

    Very weird, since I can initiate a conversation from either phone number on the computer, ehh?
     
  13. dictoresno macrumors 601

    dictoresno

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2012
    Location:
    NJ
    #13
    you guys are missing one very important piece of information. your SIM card is tied to your number. if you remove it, all your account info and phone number gets removed along with it. if you want to send imessages while overseas from your phone, but with a different SIM (which will be a different number) you can only do so by using email addresses tied to your apple ID or the new SIM number. theres NO way around that.
     
  14. shenan1982 thread starter macrumors 68040

    shenan1982

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    Nov 23, 2011
    #14
    That feels like the right answer I've just seen people with multiple phone numbers in the send-from field. Hmmm

    ----------

    A friend just made a good point. If I were to cancel att and then att gave my number to someone else, then i would get inmessages for a number I no longer own. Guess that puts it into perspective as to why I can't do it. If I had 2 iPhones and had both sims in both phones and logged into my Apple ID on both that would then allow switching between send numbers. :)
     
  15. dictoresno macrumors 601

    dictoresno

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    NJ
    #15
    if you cancel your contract, you will lose your number. however if you port out to another carrier, you will be allowed to keep it. if you were to lose your number and it were to go to someone else, your account would cease to have that number tied to it. your SIM card would be inactivated, therefore releasing your phone from any ties to that number. in turn, you will not get any messages to that number.
     
  16. shenan1982 thread starter macrumors 68040

    shenan1982

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    Nov 23, 2011
    #16
    Correct. So to use the iMessage on other devices an active sim has to be in a phone associated with your Apple ID. So if you have 3 phones logged into your Apple ID you will see 3. But if you remove the sim it'll log that number out if Apple ID because it doesn't know if the sim is active when not in a phone. Just did a test Nd this is how it works. Now it makes sense.
     
  17. dictoresno macrumors 601

    dictoresno

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    NJ
    #17
    when i went to Iceland, i got a prepaid SIM from a local carrier. this included a local Icelandic phone number. people who sent messages to my US number, failed to go through (obviously). i no longer had the option to send from that number since the SIM card was removed from the phone. i was however, able to iMessage people back home from my new number and email addresses.

    if you are going overseas and want to send imessages from your old number, you will need to either roam on your att SIM card, or use it via wifi only.

    remember, where ever your SIM card goes, so does that account including the phone number. remove it from a phone, and you have an ipod.
     
  18. shenan1982 thread starter macrumors 68040

    shenan1982

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    #18
    Yeah, I suppose I ought to just start using the email address. It would be nice if Apple released an iMessage client for PC and for Android, would be really cool actually, but my guess is that'll never happen. BlackBerry is too little too late with BBM... but they have the right idea.
     
  19. dictoresno macrumors 601

    dictoresno

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    Apr 30, 2012
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    NJ
    #19
    just give your friends a heads up and tell them they will either get an imessage from your email address or a random foreign number. i was able to do that with no issue and it worked just fine.
     
  20. matt2053 macrumors 6502a

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    Jul 8, 2012
    #20
    That might be the stupidest thing I have ever read on this forum. Wow.
     
  21. shenan1982 thread starter macrumors 68040

    shenan1982

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    Nov 23, 2011
    #21
    Why? It's really not stupid at all. Many people send messages from their apple ID because they don't want to pay for cell service. It's like when people have email signatures "Sent from my MetroPCS phone" kinda thing.

    You ought to read more if you think that's the stupidest thing you've read.
     
  22. dictoresno macrumors 601

    dictoresno

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    Apr 30, 2012
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    NJ
    #22
    Actually it is kind of stupid. I guess you're gonna look like one of those broke people when you are forced to message your friends back home from your email address.

    Maybe some people just have wifi only devices, therefore can only use an email vs phone number. Your argument here is just stupid and senseless. Just because some people can't afford post paid services or choose have wifi only devices doesn't make them look cheap.

    And just so you know, your original post asking about the whole phone number thing, that made you look silly. It's one of the most basic concepts of gsm phones and is very obvious, but we didn't lay into you or make fun of you over it. We answered your question. Until you are perfect, don't judge others.
     
  23. C DM, Oct 14, 2013
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2013

    C DM macrumors Westmere

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    #23
    Ultimately it doesn't really mean anything, and trying to find meaning is kind of pointless as well (since even if one is found it still doesn't really matter). It's fairly similar to what used to get brought up for what email service someone uses--before the general internet population essentially "grew out of it"--like having "@aol.com" email account or "@hotmail.com" or "@yahoo.com" or whatnot actually means anything at all one way or another. Some people might bring their own biases into it all, but that's a personal thing that doesn't mean anything outside of what it might mean for them personally for some reason.
     
  24. shenan1982 thread starter macrumors 68040

    shenan1982

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    #24
    Actually it's not basic nor standard, considering I can send a message from my phone's telephone number when my telephone isn't even on... so to say it's one of the most basic concepts is utter BS.... But thanks for trying!

    ----------

    So if you're going to a restaurant you've never been to and find their website to be "http://geocities.com/tomsdiner76" do you take that restaurant as seriously as if the result came back :"http://www.tomsdiner.com" ??? If so, your feelings are against the norm of those on the internet. Having quality, personalized domains is what differentiates a perception of cheap vs quality. When it costs literally $6.95 a year to have your own domain name, having an @hotmail.com or other free email providers is seen (at least by professionals in the tech industry) as off-putting. The one exception seems to be gmail for whatever reason...

    ----------

    I guess the way I look at it is I wouldn't carry around my laptop in a plastic Apple bag, I buy a nice case for it so it looks more respectable. I wouldn't print a resume on plain copy paper, because I buy a slightly heavier stock, maybe slightly darkened paper, because I want it to look more respectable. I don't spend $850 on a phone and then throw a free yahoo.com email on it when I can spend $10 a year and have a more reliable, professional looking email address with my name (or business name) as the domain.

    Perception isn't important to everyone. Plenty of people drive around dirty cars with fast food wrappers in the back seat, or wear shoes that are dirty and don't care to wash them... I guess different strokes for different folks as they say.
     
  25. C DM macrumors Westmere

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    #25
    There are many professionals, like real estate agents, for example, and various other let's say small or even somewhat larger businesses use free email providers for their contact information that they provide and use. Many of them are excellent at what they do--in fact can often be better than the various large corporate entities in their field--and judging them by their email address or even domain name would be rather pointless in that respect. It's not to say that people don't do that, but that by no means makes it any more meaningful or worthwhile.

    Comparing garbage inside of people's cars to what they use for their email address is apples vs. oranges comparison at best--they might both be fruits and edible, but they are quite different. Taking real life and applying it to the digital doesn't really pan out.

    As for the "norm" of the internet, I think we all know how poor of a standard that is be to apply to real life in pretty much most respects unfortunately.

    In any case though, everyone can certainly have their own biases, as I mentioned before. This part of the discussion can go back and forth without any particular right answer since it's different for everyone (even if sometimes not for any realistic reasons). Don't want to take more away from the actual subject of the thread though on a side discussion.
     

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