Set up per computer type

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by Texas_Toast, Nov 11, 2016.

  1. Texas_Toast macrumors 6502a

    Texas_Toast

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2016
    Location:
    Texas
    #1
    Is it fair to assume that the way you set up a new Mac is basically the same regardless of if you have a MacBook Pro, iMac or whatever?

    I would think that El Capitan is El Capitan regardless of there hardware.

    Is that true?
     
  2. Jessica Lares macrumors G3

    Jessica Lares

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Location:
    Near Dallas, Texas, USA
    #2
    Yeah. You could go as far as to boot the same install from an external drive on both an iMac and MacBook Pro and macOS would know without you doing anything special.
     
  3. MacUser2525 macrumors 68000

    MacUser2525

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2007
    Location:
    Canada
    #3
    Yes you can even take a program like Carbo Copy Cloner and make bootable copy on an external hard drive plug it into another mac hold down option key during boot select it and it will boot right up. Handy idea if you want the exact same settings on every computer once you have cloned the external to the internal of the machine you want to sync up, I do it all the time. Take it you must be new to make with all the sort of basic questions I see popping up by you?
     
  4. Texas_Toast thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Texas_Toast

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2016
    Location:
    Texas
    #4
    Not really new. Just being thorough in my learning.
    --- Post Merged, Nov 11, 2016 ---
    So if I created an guide for how I set up my rMBP, then I could give it to friend to use setting up something like a new iMac assuming we have the same OS, right?

    I wasn't sure if maybe OS-X was different somewhat on a laptop versus a desktop. Thought maybe there was some functionality unique to the device?
     
  5. MacUser2525 macrumors 68000

    MacUser2525

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2007
    Location:
    Canada
    #5
    OS X only loads what is needed when found by the hardware probing during boot. If there is anything unique to a device like trackpad and that is not an option on a desktop without one it will never be found during the probing thus never used. There are no options for its configuration in System Preferences visually the option is still there but it will tell you no device found when clicked on. Same OS can be no problem it depends if new feature in later version then that will not apply to older but if the feature is common then most times the options will apply in the older too. OSX is pretty good in that regard configurations settings do not change much where the actual files are stored if needing to manually do it do sometimes.
     
  6. KALLT macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2008
    #6
    Purely from a manual configuration standpoint, I don’t think there are any differences that you need to worry about. There are some default settings that are different for certain types of devices though. For instance, an iMac will not have the same hibernation settings as a MacBook.

    You should avoid booting two different devices from the same drive, however. Some system settings may be wrong. If you want to switch from one device to another or want to import your data onto another Mac, you should migrate your personal data and applications with Migration Assistant instead and keep them separate. Although the system will recognise the different hardware and load the extensions/drivers it needs, it will invalidate system and kernel caches and it will take days before these are fully restored.
     
  7. Texas_Toast thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Texas_Toast

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2016
    Location:
    Texas
    #7
    I was just curious if I wrote a how-to guide on setting up a Mac if it could be used across OS-X machines and it sounds like the answer is "Yes".

    So I guess I can rename my "Installation Guide for MacBook Pro" to "Installation Guide for Mac" and share it with friends if need be.
     
  8. ApfelKuchen macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2012
    Location:
    Between the coasts
    #8
    The only differences between setting up a laptop and a desktop come either prior to the Setup Assistant (connecting keyboard, mouse/trackpad, and for Minis and Mac Pros, the display) or after Setup Assistant is done (going into System Preferences to tweak things like mouse/trackpad, Dock behavior, sleep/wake, etc.).

    I know, some of us like to write procedures that suit our particular logic, but Apple does a pretty fair job of walking folks through setup: https://support.apple.com/HT205749

    Since Setup Assistant runs only once and does offer options during the process (migrating data, in particular), you wouldn't necessarily be in a position to write a comprehensive guide without performing multiple erase/reinstalls in order to explore the various branches in the program.

    If your friend is entirely new to Apple, will your guide include a primer on Apple ID and iCloud? Are you going to explain what Find My Mac is, and the reason for enabling Location Services if they do turn on Find My Mac? What about iCloud Keychain and FileVault? Will you discuss how owning an iPhone and/or iPad (and the settings on those devices) may affect the choices they make for the Mac in iCloud Preferences?

    Or are you going to tell your friend to set it up in one particular way, based on your own preferences? If they choose a different option (accidentally or intentionally), will your instructions anticipate that, or will they have to call you for help?

    As far as I'm concerned, the real "setup" options come after the Setup Assistant, when they're on the Mac desktop - tailoring their Mac to their needs. The more hand-holding we do for our friends and relatives during that process, the less self-reliant they will be forever after.
     
  9. Texas_Toast thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Texas_Toast

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2016
    Location:
    Texas
    #9
    So that is what the initial set up is called when you turn on a new Mac? The "Setup Assistant"?


    I am taking notes for myself of how I am setting up my Mac for maximum security. This means you need to do things in a certain order, which may not be obvious.

    Yes, I agree the main customizations come after you initially set things up.

    This guide is mainly for me so I don't have to remember in the future - and I figured it might be useful to some other people I know.

    I wish I had done this when I set up my last MBP so that I don't have to come on here and ask for help again! (Like when I couldn't remember how to get prompted for my hot spot password!)
     

Share This Page