Sharp 8K 27" Monitor

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Floris, Oct 6, 2016.

  1. Floris macrumors 68020

    Floris

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2007
    Location:
    Netherlands
    #1
    Ooh, looks exciting, http://www.anandtech.com/show/10732...hz-igzo-monitor-with-hdr-also-1000-ppi-for-vr

    There have been rumors that Apple might re-introduce the Cinema Display with a retina version. But if they do I might just wait another year and invest a tiny bit more money to get something like that Sharp at hopefully an affordable price.

    They introduced a monitor in Japan with a DPI of 326 and screen resolution of 7680x4320 pixels. Giving a 8K HDR screen over Display Port 1.4 at 120Hz refresh rate.

    You can't quite say it's a pretty design, but it ain't ugly either. Sure isn't flat, pretty thick but as a monitor connected to an iMac, to which I could connect a PS4 on and my ISP's DVR, I don't think it's a bad second monitor.

    #fancy
    or
    #goodstart

    What's your opinion?
     
  2. Zenithal, Oct 6, 2016
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2016

    Zenithal macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #2
    4K on a 27" monitor is difficult to see unless you play around with scaling, be it in OSX or Windows. It's not the best solution either. 4K on a 30-35" monitor is fine. 5K on a 30-35" monitor is pushing it. At that resolution, you'll either have good eyes or need scaling. If you game, assuming PC, you'll want dual high end cards to push that kind of resolution. I can't imagine something this thick (and obviously heavy), small for its resolution, and at such a high native resolution to sell well. Based off of some specs, a quad SLI of 1080s should keep some games afloat at this resolution. The problem is also media related. There's not a whole lot of 4K media to saturate buyers' needs. Roughly 10 years ago, buyers began purchasing 1080P televisions and computer monitors. Fine and dandy, but at the same time, BluRay was incredibly expensive and there wasn't enough market saturation. A buyer's television was essentially worthless if all their media was coming in at HD TV which was and still is 720P and DVDs are 480P. I bought a 1080P television then. A Sony Bravia and spent around $3,300. I didn't invest in BluRay until 2008 and it still cost a small fortune to get a decent system running a la carte. Even now we don't see a lot of 1080p material unless you specifically look for it or find a service that offers it. Various VOD sites are now offering 4K in limited selection.

    Companies are diving head first into the "Consumers like bigger numbers" game. That said, this post doesn't apply to professions like video editors, photographers, graphic artists, 3D modelers, architects and engineers using CAD programs, and such. There's monitors for trades, too. Typical widescreens, such as Dell's 29" are great for financial market employees or server admins monitoring changes and need a vast "landscape" for data.

    And let's be honest, Windows is incredibly behind OSX in terms of high resolution support. Windows 10 is a massive improvement over 8.1 and 7, but let's face it, Windows 10 experiences a panic attack once a month and fudges itself for thousands of users.
     
  3. Floris thread starter macrumors 68020

    Floris

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2007
    Location:
    Netherlands
  4. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Location:
    The Finger Lakes Region
    #4
    To me it's the classic saying " the chicken before the egg". :(
     

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