shooting 24 fps with a sony 1080i

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by tmacintyre, Aug 23, 2008.

  1. tmacintyre macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2008
    #1
    I would like to shoot with a sony 1080i hdv camera at 24 frames per second. Is this possible in the shooting or do I shoot and then capture in final cut pro at 24 frames per second? Thanks.
     
  2. fiercetiger224 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    #2
    Can you tell us what camera you have? I believe Sony only has 24fps (or proper term is 24p) on their prosumer line cameras. I know Canon has 24p on their consumer lines of cameras. It depends on what camera you have!

    Anyway, you NEVER, EVER, import something in another framerate. Always import at native framerate. In post, you can use a plugin like Magic Bullet or Natress Standards Conversion to change framerates if needed, although you do lose a little bit of vertical resolution if you use those tools.
     
  3. scamperdekot macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    #3
    tmacintyre

    I use JES Deinterlacer to convert 1080i 60fps to 720p 24fps.
    Also try MPEG Streamclip.
     
  4. P-Worm macrumors 68020

    P-Worm

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    #4
    If your camera doesn't shoot 24 frames per second natively (also known as 24p or 24F if you're using a Canon), then conversion after the fact probably won't give you the results you want. It's not just the frame rate, but the motion blur that goes a long with it. If you don't have the right motion blur, then it will look choppy.

    You're probably best off just editing and outputting in the format you shot in. Keep in mind though, that 24 fps is far from the magic setting that will make your footage look like film. If anything, lighting is much more important.

    P-Worm
     
  5. scamperdekot macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    #5
    Check out my videos on vimeo...

    http://vimeo.com/1533359

    I give a description of how I got there...
    What do you think?
    Thanks
     
  6. fiercetiger224 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    #6
    Very true. If you've got a consumer grade camera without 24p, it's best to check if your camera has shutter speed settings. If you're shooting in 60i, always shoot at 1/60 if you have any shutter speed settings, since that'll give you the best mix of proper motion blur to go along with any post 24p conversion. If you've got a 24p mode on your camera, shoot in 1/48 shutter.

    Also, it would really help if you told us what camcorder you've got. Most newer camcorders are starting to give us more "pro" features, so let us know what you have, and we should be able give you more help!
     
  7. Apple Corps macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2003
    Location:
    California
    #7
    The primary feedback is that you need to invest in a tripod - the camera motion is way too distracting to enjoy the subject
     
  8. bigbossbmb macrumors 68000

    bigbossbmb

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2004
    Location:
    Pasadena/Hollywood
    #8
    ...still looks like video.

    converting to 24fps and masking to 2.35 isn't going to make it look like it was shot on film. sorry.
     
  9. scamperdekot macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    #9
    Apple Corps,
    I have a tripod, in fact I have 4.
    The point of the video was laid out in the narrative...
    It was a quick grab... Not meant to be a documentary on butterflies.
    I was just interested in the filmic quality, if any.

    bigbossbmb didn't think it was good enough.

    I'll give it another try some day.

    Thanks for your input...
     
  10. Consultant macrumors G5

    Consultant

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
    #10
    Read the manual. Those cams typically let you change fps.
     
  11. bigbossbmb macrumors 68000

    bigbossbmb

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2004
    Location:
    Pasadena/Hollywood
    #11
    it's not a matter of conversion settings... shooting 60i will not give you a film look, period, no matter what you do to it later.
     
  12. Apple Corps macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2003
    Location:
    California
    #12
    scamperdekot - I understood the point - I just found it difficult to watch.

    bigbossbmb - would you expand a bit more on how to achieve the more cinematic look within the context of this thread? I am a real beginner - but my assignments need that cinematic look and a lot less video look.

    Thank you.
     
  13. bigbossbmb macrumors 68000

    bigbossbmb

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2004
    Location:
    Pasadena/Hollywood
    #13
    then you need great lighting and a camera that actually shoots 24p (and shoot with a 1/48 shutter)... then it'll look more like a film.

    if you want it to seem like a movie then add great sound (just give up if you use the internal mic), lowered saturation, some shallow DOF (don't over do it), and steady camera movements (use a tripod or steadycam, never hand hold it).

    you have to shoot it like film to make it look like film... it's not about the post-production.
     
  14. Apple Corps macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2003
    Location:
    California
    #14

    Thanks - I am leaning toward the Canon XH A1 with a Manfrotto 503 fluid head on one of their video tripods. I've used the Canon Vixia HF 100 and with no experience was very pleased with the results - credit the camcorder.

    I'm adding video capability due to client needs - have done a fair amount of 35mm still photography and many of the principles carry over. My most critical work will be indoor video clips of people in work settings. I love the HD clarity but want a warmer / softer image to present.

    Other suggestions and comments please.
     
  15. bigbossbmb macrumors 68000

    bigbossbmb

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2004
    Location:
    Pasadena/Hollywood
    #15
    The Canon is a very good camera. I cannot speak highly enough about the Manfrotto 503. It is an amazing tripod and is perfect for whatever camera you choose. I just sold my camera package (DVX100B+Manfrotto 503/351mvb) and actually miss the tripod the most.

    Depending on your timeframe for buying the camera I would also look into the Panasonic HMC150. These are new Panasonic cameras that will both deliver higher quality compression than the A1's HDV. The HMC150 should be comparably priced and shoot to inexpensive SD memory cards.
     
  16. Apple Corps macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2003
    Location:
    California
    #16
    skamperdekot - may I continue with the highjack of your thread :eek: :eek:

    The Panasonic looks impressive - my camera time frame is over the next 2 - 3 months. I have to work on managing my love of Canon lenses - it will open up other product potentials.

    My head is spinning with all of the AVCHD work flow / intermediate codec / yada yada concerns - very confusing. To some extent, I think on these computer forums the file format / digital details overwhelm the more critical components (lens, processor, composition, content, technique, lighting,....)

    Maybe that is what I am hoping as a way around all of the technical debates going on (tape vs memory cards, codec, storage, work flow,...)
     
  17. corywoolf macrumors 65816

    corywoolf

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2004
    #17
    Don't shoot 24p on the Sony FX1 or any Sony cam's that use the same fake 24p, it will not work out well in FCP. There is currently little support for Sony's version of 24p for the FX1. Canon's version is much better.
     

Share This Page