Shopping comparisons new MP vs Hackintosh

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by thegame46, Mar 11, 2009.

  1. thegame46 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2009
    #1
    I thought I would share this research I had been doing in trying to decide whether to drop money on a MP or try and build my own. Sorry if its hard to read but basically I used the exact same configurations with the acceptation of not using ECC ram in the hackintosh. Main thing that changes is the board and cpu. I added 3 tb drives and wireless to all of them to reflect my actual purpose with the Education discount, which is $300 off. So just add $300 to mac prices to account for the discount. I also used the 4870 vid card in all to keep it consistent and I was thinking I would go with that for compatibility sake

    MBP
    Base 3134
    8gb ram
    2x 2.26 nah
    nvidia gt 120
    airport extreme
    640gb hd

    extra ram
    4gb $99
    Vid card upgrade

    HD's
    3 x 1tb 270

    Total 3503

    oct 2.66 4394
    8gb ram
    2x 2.66 nah
    nvidia gt 120
    airport extreme
    640gb hd

    extra ram
    4gb $99
    Vid card upgrade

    HD's
    3 x 1tb 270

    Total 4763

    Quad 2434
    2.66
    6gb mem

    air 45

    HD's
    3 x 1tb 270

    Total 2749

    quad 2884
    2.93
    6gb mem

    air 45
    HD's
    3 x 1tb 270

    Total 3199

    Hackintosh
    core i7 290
    HD's 270
    Vid Card 170
    MB 300
    Case 100
    PSU 75
    Wireless card 50
    superdrive 25
    cooling fan 50
    memory 314

    Total 1644

    Oct Hackintosh
    2.26 $740
    HD's 270
    Vid Card 170
    MB 600
    Case 100
    PSU 75
    Wireless card 50
    superdrive 25
    cooling fan 50
    memory 630

    Total 2710

    2.66 $2,120
    HD's 270
    Vid Card 170
    MB 600
    Case 100
    PSU 75
    Wireless card 50
    superdrive 25
    cooling fan 50
    memory 630

    Total 4090

    In conclusion, the Macp Pro 2.66 and up is not a bad value vs what you could build on your own. But the 2.26 and the single quad core versions are not a very good value when compared to using comparable hardware.
     
  2. idiotboy macrumors newbie

    idiotboy

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Location:
    Virginia
    #2
    I would love to see some bench marks though.. I haven't seen Hackintosh beat an actual mac in benchmarks yet.
     
  3. davewolfs macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2007
    #3
    This comparison really doesn't make sense aside from Comparing the Quad 920 vs the Quad 2.66.

    No motherboard exists currently that supports multiple Xeon CPU's.

    What is clear is that the Quad Mac Pro is around 100% more then an equivalent PC which is ridiculous. Don't forget that the 920 can be easily overclocked without additional cooling.

    Here is a benchmark of a typical 920 overclocked setup.

    http://browse.geekbench.ca/geekbench2/view/115516

    13,516 aint bad at all for a $1500 setup.
     
  4. Umbongo macrumors 601

    Umbongo

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    Location:
    England
    #4
    You can order them now from a number of stores.
     
  5. sneezymarble macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2008
    #5
    Almost every quad i7 Hack is beating the quad Macs and as soon as dual processor Xeon motherboards are available you'll see the Hacks take the overall performance lead again. Unfair or not, every Hack user has the advantage of being able to easily overclock the hell out of their chips.
     
  6. idiotboy macrumors newbie

    idiotboy

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2009
    Location:
    Virginia
  7. shokunin macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2005
    #7
    What is interesting is that an overclocked 920 to 3.6-4.0ghz runs single-threaded applications blazing fast. Plus when you need to render, my overclocked i7 920 4-core beat or equaled my octo 2.8ghz mac pro. No, it won't beat the 2.93ghz Octo Mac Pro, but that config is nearly $6000 versus my sub $1000 Hackintosh at 3.6ghz. It's nearly the best of both worlds, fast at single-threaded and multi-threaded applications.

    When comparing quad to quad, even my micro-ATX X58 motherboard has 6 DDR3 slots and up to 24GB of RAM versus 8GB limit on the Mac Pro Quad.
     
  8. davewolfs macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2007
    #8
  9. cleric macrumors 6502a

    cleric

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2008
    Location:
    Minneapolis, MN
    #9
    You got to remember the pro comes with the best case and a pretty nice power supply.
     
  10. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #10
    Manufacturer's haven't yet posted the DP boards on their sites, but the SKU's have made it to e-tailers already, if not actual stock.

    The cost differences make a Hack a tempting alternative though, and I'd expect a few are looking at it as a serious one, given the pricing of the MP line.
    The lower cost of a self built machine, and at least the potential of beating a stock MP with an OC is hard to ignore. ;)
    Marketing. :p

    On the serious side, you get a system that's ready to go (no assembly required, or hunting drivers), and has a single warranty provider.

    The importance of this depends on the individual, and perhaps their skill level with DIY systems, and OC'ing, if they take that route. If you're an old hand at making it stable, it may not be that big a deal. OTOH, if an individual doesn't have lots of experience or possibly time, a ready made system would be a more attractive alternative.

    Corporate customers would most likely ignore a Hack all together. Easier as a tax deduction, can be financed if needed, and comes with warranty support. ;)
    This is certainly a good reason to at least consider a Hack for those who are willing. :D
     
  11. thegame46 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2009
    #11
    Just another option
    Ebay has openstar closes
    i7 clocked at 3.2ghz
    12gb ram
    1.5 tb HDD

    WiFi Card & Router, Network Card, Keyboard, Mouse

    Advertised geekbench of 9400 running OS 10.5.6

    $1799 OBO
     
  12. stix666 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2005
    #12
    How noisy (or quiet) are these hackintosh machines?
     
  13. Umbongo macrumors 601

    Umbongo

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    Location:
    England
    #13
    You'd have to contact the seller if you were buying a prebuilt. If you are building it yourself you can make a quieter system than a Mac Pro.
     
  14. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #14
    Exactly.

    It's possible to build a system that keeps noise at 20dBA max., depending on cooler(s) and case fan choices made. :)
     
  15. Macpropro80 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2009
    #15
    Your going to need more then 1 fan for an i7, i won't boot it with less then 4 or 5.
     
  16. fabriciom macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Location:
    Madrid, España
    #16
    I've been using a hackintosh since Tiger. Based on an Intel board and Q6600. I think its been exactly 2 years. Let me tell you, just by the fact that every other update I would hose my system and had to format and reinstall. I'll pass on a hackintosh. Also there is always something that is not going to work right, network, sound, graphics,etc. Other wise if you want to try it. Go right ahead. For me it was a test to evaluate if I really needed to change and it also allowed me to learn to use Logic and also see if it was worth it.
     
  17. Gonk42 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2008
    Location:
    near Cambridge
    #17
    I think I agree if you have a lot of software invested in OS X, Apple can take advantage of the fact that you've already invested a lot. For me I currently run Linux and Windows and was thinking of switching to a Mac Pro so I don't need something that will run OS X, just Linux and it seems to me a bit dangerous to acquire too much in the way of expensive Apple specific software as you are then captive to the whims of Apple's marketing.

    I was attracted by Apple's student discount (which is quite good in the UK) but the price hike has been so enormous alternatives still look rather attractive. Also I find it very annoying that Apple have restricted the RAM slots to 4 per processor whereas other manufacturers (apart from Intel themselves) provide 6 per processor.
     
  18. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #18
    Switching primary OS's can be an expensive venture, as the softaware can easily out cost the machine. :(

    Add it in, and you get the "real" cost of switching. Not attractive, whether going from windows to OS X, or vice versa, even with VM. Some things just have to be native, and then there's the programs you'd prefer to be. ;) :p
     

Share This Page