Should Apple buy RIM's secure network?

Discussion in 'Apple, Inc and Tech Industry' started by PracticalMac, May 30, 2012.

  1. PracticalMac macrumors 68030

    PracticalMac

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    Jan 22, 2009
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    #1
    My understanding what makes RIM popular for enterprise is the propitiatory secure email network.

    What if Apple buys that and offers it on iOS?
    Will lock in segment of market Android and Winphone cant.

    Of course Apple could make its own, but why reinvent the wheel?
     
  2. roadbloc macrumors G3

    roadbloc

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    #2
    I don't think RIM will be planning on selling it. And tbh, iMessage seems to be pretty reliable.
     
  3. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    #3
    Problem is it would cause companies to dump that network even faster.

    No one in enterprise trust Apple for a damn good reason.
     
  4. G51989 macrumors 68030

    G51989

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    #4
    I don't RIM is going to go away.

    I think they'll reinvent themselves, they'll end up selling basic Blackberry's to business's, super secure email, msging and all that fun stuff. At a discounted data plan, I think business will love it. And I think it will happen.

    Apple is probably the least loved company in the enterprise market, and they do a bit of data mining, where RIM does not. They would all just drop it.
     
  5. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    #5
    I'm not seeing that as a good move by apple. They seem to have enough problems with iCloud and they built that. How will they manage someone else's network.

    Besides what advantage will they gain for spending tons of money. RIM is losing marketshare left and right to iOS and android. Apple can sit by and let the customers come to them
     
  6. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    Los Angeles
    #6
    I think that is too much of a niche filled with very demanding, low margin clients for Apple. Apple's history the past decade or so has basically been to bring experiences to a mainstream audience. They are fine if the niches come to them but they aren't going to cater to the niches.


    Lethal
     
  7. Jedii macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2012
    #7
    RIM's APN is their biggest asset, they won't seel it. They should license their enterprise components ( BES ) etc.
     
  8. Consultant macrumors G5

    Consultant

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    Jun 27, 2007
    #8
    iOS is already in use / being tested in over 90% of Fortune 500 companies.
     
  9. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    Oct 9, 2006
    #9
    I am going to point out all that means is that they are allowing employee owned iPhones to access the email system.

    That is vastly different than company own devices on the network. Very different things.
     
  10. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    Boston
    #10
    Yup, my company allows this, provided the phone has the proper security features. Both the iPhone and Blackberry phones do, some (many?) of the android phones do not so my company blocks those phones from the exchange servers.

    In a sense companies I think like this as it saves them $$ from supplying their employees with phones themselves.
     
  11. rbrian macrumors 6502a

    rbrian

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    Location:
    Aberdeen, Scotland
    #11
    My FTSE100 company is rolling out around 100,000 iPhones to all UK employees. They are, unfortunately, crippled to make them more secure, but they're vastly better than the basic Nokias we used to have, or the incomprehensibly awful Windows Mobile 5.0 not-very-smartphones we trialled in 2007.

    We use them for corporate email (no personal email allowed), access to those parts of the intranet which don't use popups (can't turn off the pop-up blocker) and our own apps (App Store app removed) to deliver work to the engineers and allow managers to do whatever it is that managers do.
     
  12. smithrh macrumors 68020

    smithrh

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    Feb 28, 2009
    #12
    I'd roll out a few more examples within the Fortune 100 to counter RP's claims, but I doubt it would change his mind, it appears well-set at this time.
     
  13. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    Oct 9, 2006
    #13
    Depends on the feature. Most Android phones are more secure for a company than an iPhone and offer features IT departments like.

    Reason the Android phones are more secure is the corpate side and the personal side can be separated. That means a company can remotely wipe all their stuff from the phone and leave the personal side alone. That means if someone leaves the company they can remotely wipe all their data off the phone. Not something the iPhone can do. I know some pretty big name company that will block the iPhone but allow Android for this very reason.

    It all in all it would be relatively few Android phones that fail to have those features and I would question the quality of an IT department if they did not know that.
     
  14. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    Jul 11, 2003
    #14
    These Apple should buy threads are ridiculous. Apple doesn't make big acquisitions. They buy small companies with technologies they need and people they want.
     
  15. rhett7660, May 31, 2012
    Last edited: May 31, 2012

    rhett7660 macrumors G4

    rhett7660

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    Jan 9, 2008
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    #15
    Really, that is funny, because right now you can separate iOS items from personal and department and they can remote swipe either select items or the whole phone. Hmm. Might want to do a little more research into this before saying it as fact because it sounds like you haven't done any lately.
     

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