Should Apple Implement a Feature Like this?

Discussion in 'Mac OS X Lion (10.7)' started by WAM2, Sep 26, 2011.

  1. WAM2, Sep 26, 2011
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2011

    WAM2 macrumors 6502a

    WAM2

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    #1
    Well I Have been thinking of an Application or Utility/Tool rather, that Since Lion is So Much like OS with launchpad, and autocorrection act, That if your like me and your mac gets hot or even overheats It will Like iOS, Autosave the application state using Resume, and force quit all applications and lock you out of your mac and show a Message like those on iOS Devices:

    iPad: http://www.okaygeek.com/storage/post-images/apple/ipad/4654455308_3c60ff3613_b.jpg (Photo Credit okaygeek.com)

    iPhone: http://i.afterdawn.com/storage/pictures/temp.jpg (Photo Credit Afterdawn.com)

    Would it be worth Suggesting Apple To Implement This in an Update or Into the next Mac OS X?.. It Would Prevent Many Macs from Melting (Yes, First gen MacBook Pros and MacBooks got that hot) and From Hardware being damaged and would really Lower the Amount of complaints about overheating, sure it wouldn't SOLVE overheating, fan or thermal paste problems but Would prevent melting and burns...

    How I Think they could do it is,

    Since Mac's probably have the most temperature sensors in them, you Could develop an application that Starts up at login and Starts detecting the CPU and Graphics card (or Chipset), along with the Hard Drive temperature, Much like iStat Applications and SMC Fan Control, and Come up with an Average Temperature inside the mac.. Now if this isn't possible its most likely that your CPU is going to be the Hottest Component in the Mac. So For Each different model of macs, the TJUNCTION Temperature is going to be different on the CPU, like for example, my mac has a Core 2 Duo 2Ghz T7200 and it's TJUNCTION Temperature is 100 C. And in iStat it gets up to 90c So When it reaches that Burning 90c or 99c the Application will Kick in, Do a command to Save the applications state and force quit it, and lock out the user from the mac and display a warning Animation or Picture like the iPad One until the Temperature is back down to an acceptable one, like 60 or 70c in my case.

    Not sure if this is completely possible but i think it would be a great idea! Tell me what you think!
     
  2. jameslmoser macrumors 6502

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    #2
    This shouldn't happen with normal computer usage. I wouldn't buy a computer if the manufacturer of the system and software had to put this feature into it.

    I have also never seen that on any of my idevices... what are you doing to them? :eek:
     
  3. iThinkergoiMac macrumors 68030

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    #3
    First off, this post is very difficult to read due to the random capitalization and lack of punctuation. If you can, please write clearer so that we can understand you better.

    It sounds like you want to have the OS automatically save all open documents when it reaches a certain temperature threshold beyond which it will automatically shut down. Is that correct?

    If so, it's an interesting idea but has all sorts of problems in application (har, har). For one thing, what happens if your computer reaches that threshold but never actually progresses far enough to warrant a shutdown? You'll have data that gets saved but may not be desired. With Lion's auto-save and resume features, even if the computer were to suddenly shut down you would, in theory, lose very little work.
     
  4. WAM2 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    WAM2

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    #4
    It usually happens when You leave it in the car or sun..
     
  5. jameslmoser macrumors 6502

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    #5
    Well then don't do that! :D
     
  6. WAM2 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    WAM2

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    #6
    Never heard of capitalization causing problems to read, anyhow. It is just to prevent The Computer from actually shutting down. You more stopping and starting of the hard drive (Which most macs have if they are the ones overheating...) the less the hard drive will last and eventually break. Also It is frustrating Having to always restart your computer. Now Also to the guy before you, the whole idea of this is for older macs and ones with problems (which really isn't a whole lot) to not be as frustrated. Also the fact is even if it doesn't progress to warrant a shutdown, if it was running in the TJuc. Zone of 1-10c of it that is burning hot, and I Wouldn't be putting it on my lap. If you were to let it Stop what ever is making it run that hot for at least 45 seconds and resume it it would be great IMO.. Just a thought I Had that would solve many problems.
     
  7. iThinkergoiMac macrumors 68030

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    #7
    I did say capitalization and punctuation. Your first post had a grand total of 3 periods, and capital letters all over the place. It made it quite difficult to tell when one sentence had ended and the other began.

    That's the last I'm going to say about this. I only wrote it to make sure you were aware how difficult it was to read.

    If your Mac is having the problems you're describing, something is wrong with your system. Either you have fans that aren't spinning, or aren't spinning fast enough, or something else. It could be an excessive build-up of dust, or a contact between the CPU/GPU and the heat sink that has gone bad, or any number of things. Instead of trying to write an application to save stuff in case it shuts down, you should look at cleaning out your Mac as that will likely fix the problem you're having.
     
  8. WAM2 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    WAM2

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    #8
    I Have Already Checked That, its not a problem as my Mac has never actually Gotten to a problem of shutting down. The CPU that was put into this generation of macs was one that ran hot, its just a simple Feature that prevents further problems and/or damage to your mac if it is one that runs hot or overheats.
     
  9. QuarterSwede macrumors G3

    QuarterSwede

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    #9
    I don't think your nuts OP. Not a bad idea to keep things consistent and failures from happening.
     
  10. iThinkergoiMac macrumors 68030

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  11. WAM2 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    WAM2

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    #11
    There are several Generations of macs that run hot or Overheat, The Mid 2007 macbook, 1st gen MBP,2nd Gen MBP, and 3rd Gen MBP, the 1st & 2nd Gen MBA, 2nd Gen Intel Mini, 2008 iMacs, and 2010 27 inch iMacs. Its not a problem unless they overheat. Running hot on a desktop may not be a problem but on Laptops it is, and I Think letting it stop for 45sec at least to cool and resume would be great. You can never say they there won't be hot running laptops or desktops in the future from apple, and almost every generation will run hot with some user.
     
  12. iThinkergoiMac macrumors 68030

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    #12
    Some of the aluminum laptops have a tendency to run hot, it is true. 'Tis a function of aluminum, and it's hard to overcome that issue.

    The mid-2007 MacBook doesn't have an overheating issue, not that I've heard. Certainly my mid-2007 MacBook runs far cooler than my old PowerBook G4, and has never gotten uncomfortably hot.

    How hot a laptop gets has a lot to do with what you're doing on it at the time. If I run heavy Photoshop tasks, my laptop will get very hot. However, I generally don't try to do that when sitting on the couch. I'm not saying that Apple has done everything perfectly, far from it.

    It's an interesting feature idea, but I think it could cause as much confusion as it could help. A better solution, I think, would be to give the user more control over the speed step functionality of the CPU. The slower you make the CPU run, the cooler the computer will run. This means you don't have to wait for things to pause and cool down as they never get very hot to begin with. Unfortunately Apple has not provided us with an easy way to control that. The technology is there, and used by the OS, but the user has no control over it through Apple-provided means, barring any Terminal commands.
     
  13. WAM2 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    WAM2

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    #13
    The Mid 2007 White MacBook didn't have a Overheating problem rather they ran hot.. Of Course it doesn't mean every one of them did but A Large portion did.
     
  14. jameslmoser macrumors 6502

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    #14
    The aluminum is actually to dissipate the heat from the system. Thats why it gets hot. Plastic wouldn't feel as hot because it doesn't transfer the heat from the inside to the outside as well. So its good that the aluminum is hot because it means its doing what Apple wanted it to do, but obviously the cooler you can keep your notebook the better.
     
  15. iThinkergoiMac macrumors 68030

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    #15
    While I didn't say it in as many words, this is precisely my point.

    It's still an issue because of comfort, but short of using a plastic bottom and making the rest of the frame aluminum, I don't see how one could easily overcome the issue.
     

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