Should I leave iPhone plugged in when tethering?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by PowerMan572, Jan 23, 2015.

  1. PowerMan572 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2014
    #1
    I know tethering is hard on the battery, so I'm wondering if I should just leave my iPhone on the charger the entire time I'm tethering?

    The reason I ask is because I also thought I read that you should let your battery drain before charging it again. If I do this, I might have to charge it over and over throughout the day. (I don't think this is very good for the phone.)

    I'm not sure what is best for the phone. I came from Android, so I didn't have to worry about this. I could just replace my battery once a year.


    What are your thoughts on keeping the phone plugged in or not plugged in when tethering? I'll be tethering for around 8 hours each time while I'm at work.
     
  2. XT550 macrumors regular

    XT550

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2014
    #2
    Definitely keep it plugged in.
    And do not drain your battery before recharge. The only time you'd need to do it would be when you'd want to calibrate your battery.
     
  3. Newtons Apple macrumors G5

    Newtons Apple

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2014
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Florida
    #3
    No doubt if a plug is available, leave it plugged in. I used to worry about my battery like you but got over it and just use my phone and not worry about it. I never discharge my battery and even after a year my iPhone batteries still are in excellent health.
     
  4. scaredpoet macrumors 604

    scaredpoet

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    #4
    If you're tethering a laptop, you can connect your iPhone to the laptop via USB and have it share the internet connection over the cable instead of using WiFi or bluetooth. It's a lot more reliable, and you can charge your phone from your laptop at the same time you use the internet connection.

    If the laptop runs windows, you'll need to install iTunes first. And if it's running linux, you need to install the right drivers.
     
  5. JulesJam macrumors 68020

    JulesJam

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2014
    #5
    You don't calibrate lithium ion batteries. They do not have memory like a nickle cadmium battery.

    Letting a lithium ion battery go below 10% shortens its life and you should avoid ever letting them get that low on charge. It is better to never let them go below 20%.

    Apple says to plug your battery in as soon as you get the low battery warning.

    I carry the Motorola power pack micro on my keychain, which works great for android. I hope they can make one with the qualcom quick charge technology.
     
  6. FieldingMellish Suspended

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    #6
    I calibrate my iPhone battery maybe 4 times a year.
     
  7. Newtons Apple macrumors G5

    Newtons Apple

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    Mar 12, 2014
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Florida
    #7
    Is your phone battery getting out of calibration?
     
  8. JulesJam macrumors 68020

    JulesJam

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2014
    #8
    Do you mean you drain it to zero? Because if you do, you are doing something that is not only unnecessary, it is harmful.
     
  9. wolfaaron macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2012
    #9
    I wasn't aware that it was harmful. This is the first time I'm hearing this. I bought an iphone 4s 2 years ago and I probably let it discharge to 1-10% at least once per week and the battery still works perfectly. Did the 4s have a different type of battery than the 6? I have a 6 and I want to be careful not to damage the battery.
     
  10. FieldingMellish Suspended

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    #10
    No, because of the quarterly attention it gets.

    ----------

    I also don't pay attention to those guys holding signs that say the end is near.
     
  11. JulesJam macrumors 68020

    JulesJam

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2014
    #11
    Or apparently, science.

    ----------

    Idk what the iP4s had but the iP6 has a lithium-ion polymer battery.
     
  12. FieldingMellish Suspended

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    Jun 20, 2010
    #12
     
  13. JulesJam macrumors 68020

    JulesJam

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2014
    #13
    All science is apparently junk to you.
     
  14. Newtons Apple macrumors G5

    Newtons Apple

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    Mar 12, 2014
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Florida
    #14
    So you do not know if it "needs attention", it just gets it no matter what.
     
  15. FieldingMellish Suspended

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2010
    #15
    Oh, so clever.

    ----------

    Yeah. Like an oil change.
     
  16. lordofthereef macrumors G4

    lordofthereef

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2011
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    #16
    Based on Apple's own page on batteries, all that really makes a difference in the health of a battery is total charge cycles. A cycle is calculated based on every 100% TOTAL the battery is drained and charged. Let's say I charge every time my batter is at 50% and hit 100%. I then wait until 50% until I charge it back to 100%. That is one charge cycle regardless of how much time it took me.

    There are also apps out there that tell you your charge cycles (they are recorded by the OS, though Apple hasn't made this a default statistic for some reason).

    ----------

    I would imagine that Apple's hardware/software keep the battery from discharging to "dangerous" levels. The link below explains everything I would think almost anyone would want to know about lithium ion.

    In short, you are right, it shouldn't be completely discharged. But when a phone is at 0 it is still not completely discharged. So I imagine the proer safeguards are in place.

    http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/charging_lithium_ion_batteries
    I have personally never even seen a lithium ion battery unable to be charged even after stored for a very long time. That's not to say it doesn;t happen (I am sure it does), but it's hard to "force" it to that point I would think.
     
  17. leventozler macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    #17
    Calibration is for batteries that have charger controller. You do calibrate li-ion batteries, so the controller can relearn the usable capacity.

    Apple claims that its devices with built-in batteries doesn't need calibration, but I do calibrate it once a couple of months and never had problems.

    I would leave my iPhone on the charger, so it wouldn't use the battery and waste a cycle..
     
  18. lordofthereef macrumors G4

    lordofthereef

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    Nov 29, 2011
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    #18
    Now this is something that I am confused on. Does it actually not use the battery cycle? My understanding is that it does (and that you are not using 100% auxillary power).

    I can say for certain my macbook works that way. I got it with a dozen cycles on the battery (basically new) and is has about 150 now. It hasn't spent nearly that amount of time off the charger (its bsically a desktop replacment). I used it off the charger once (for the whole day) and thats it.
     
  19. leventozler macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    #19
    http://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201585
     
  20. ron7624 Contributor

    ron7624

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    Oct 14, 2011
    Location:
    Houston, Texas area
    #20
    Yes. Plug it in when tethering. You won't hurt the battery, and your phone won't be drained when you have to unplug and travel.
     
  21. JulesJam macrumors 68020

    JulesJam

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2014
    #21
    Li-ion polymer batteries self-discharge when left sitting over time. So while there may be that circuitry inside, over time the physical properties of the material are such that they continue to discharge until they are fully discharged unless you connect them to a power source.
     
  22. lordofthereef macrumors G4

    lordofthereef

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2011
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    #22
    That link didn't really do anything to explain my question lol. I understand what charge cycles are. What I don;t understand is how much, if any, battery is consumed while plugged in. I am fairly convinced battery is, indeed, consumed while plugged in. Otherwise I shouldn't have more than maybe half a dozen charge cycles on my Mac.

    ----------

    Right. I was merely saying that discharging a phone to "0" and then charging it up again isn't going to damage the battery, as was implied. If that isn;t what you were implying then I misunderstood.

    For the record, AFAIK, all batteries discharge, to some degree, over time.
     
  23. ron7624 Contributor

    ron7624

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    Oct 14, 2011
    Location:
    Houston, Texas area
    #23
    What does his have to do with the op's question?
    Rabbit holes everywhere lol
     
  24. leventozler macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    #24
    I'm not sure, older models required battery to be present to fully utilize the CPU. If that's still the case (battery kicks in when doing something CPU/GPU intensive), and if you're using it for gaming/encoding etc. it may use the battery.
     
  25. JulesJam macrumors 68020

    JulesJam

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2014
    #25
    No, what I was saying was the problem is letting it get to zero - that harms the battery and since there is no memory in a Li-ion-polymer battery, you don't benefit from doing it.
     

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