Should we be worried about Dropbox's ToS?

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by onthecouchagain, Jul 9, 2011.

  1. onthecouchagain macrumors 604

    onthecouchagain

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    Mar 29, 2011
    #1
  2. Mrguidogenio macrumors regular

    Mrguidogenio

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    #3
    Honestly, if they can access my information I don't give a ****. I just have piano sheets, Word Files from my college works and other less important things of the same kind. Nothing which I could be concerned of being "inspected" by the Dropbox Team.
     
  3. iammike1 macrumors 6502a

    iammike1

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    Columbia MD
    #4
  4. cuestakid macrumors 68000

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    San Fran
    #5
    This article seems to make the best arguments for why people should not be worried-

    http://mac.appstorm.net/general/app-news/three-reasons-you-shouldnt-drop-dropbox/

    I think the part that most people dont realize is that any company that you give your data to and ask them to make it accessible you are giving away your data in that you are letting someone else view your data-it is your decision to trust this third party. If you dont want to trust them, don't use the services.

    That is the risk of online data use, sadly...
     
  5. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    Boston
    #6
    I'm not concerned and it seems better then the ToS that google uses for many of its products
     
  6. maclaptop macrumors 65816

    maclaptop

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    #7
    Dropbox has responded in an exemplary fashion. I for one, just happen to read all TOS / Privacy Clauses, and other boilerplate that various sites employ. While it's not my idea of a fun time, it pays handsomely to know what you are signing.

    That said, another practice I make of habit of acting on, is to only put up in the cloud the kinds of files that have no personal data of consequence. Therefore if the entire cloud goes down it's meaningless to me.

    Yet to do this, one has to be prepared to educate themselves on backup options, be willing to pay for the equipment, and do the maintenance. I feel those expenses in time and money are quite worthwhile. The payoff for me, is complete peace of mind knowing my closed NAS system, with no connection to the internet is 100% secure.

    Then when I put things in the cloud, as I routinely do it's merely out of convenience, not necessity.
     

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