Sierra to Mojave questions?

onlyremainingname

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jul 9, 2018
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CAN & USA
I have a 2015 MacBook Pro, runs great on Sierra, but I know that support for Sierra will likely end this year.
My question, the new Apple File System introduced in High Sierra, do most older apps break down with the new file system? Is Apple File System noticeably better or worse?
How is CS6 suites compatibility in Mojave in either Apple File System or Mac OS Extended Journaled? I am not a professional graphic designer or anything, I own the CS6 suites from my years at school. I am an intermediate, not a power user and want to continue to use apps like Photoshop and Audition when I need them.
If I upgrade, should I use Apple File System or Mac OS Extended Journaled?
 

Riwam

macrumors 65816
Jan 7, 2014
1,028
209
Basel, Switzerland
I have a 2015 MacBook Pro, runs great on Sierra, but I know that support for Sierra will likely end this year.
My question, the new Apple File System introduced in High Sierra, do most older apps break down with the new file system? Is Apple File System noticeably better or worse?
How is CS6 suites compatibility in Mojave in either Apple File System or Mac OS Extended Journaled? I am not a professional graphic designer or anything, I own the CS6 suites from my years at school. I am an intermediate, not a power user and want to continue to use apps like Photoshop and Audition when I need them.
If I upgrade, should I use Apple File System or Mac OS Extended Journaled?
I cannot say how APFS works (I have not tried it yet) but other people will no doubt tell you.
You could make a bootable clone of your present HFS+ system and upgrade your main drive to Mojave APFS. Would that not tell you at least if some things do not work or work better than they did with your previous MacOS and HFS+?
In my MP 6.1, I upgraded through an external bootable USB drive from Sierra to High Sierra (the last issue 10.13.6) and cloned it back to the inner drive to get High Sierra and keep HFS+.
I use third part tools for NTFS on the MacOS side and another tool on the Bootcamp Windows to see HFS+ drives and the tools I have presently work with HFS+ as does Disk Warrior which I very much appreciate and has helped me in many MacOS difficult situations.
I was happy that High Sierra still worked with HFS+ but to get Mojave work with HFS+ is an entirely different story, much more complicated I have not considered yet. Some people have found work arounds in other threads of this forum but it's not a simple thing,
Probably the best for you is just to try it but keeping a HFS+ bootable clone of your previous system in case you do not like Mojave and APFS.
 
Last edited:

mikzn

macrumors 68000
Sep 2, 2013
1,529
778
Vancouver
I have a rMBP2015 (among other macs) and have been using Mojave since the 2nd or 3rd Beta version - Sierra was a great OS but Mojave is better IMHO

I would go strait to the new files system APFS - and not try to keep your foot on first base while trying to go to second base (HFS) - so to speak. It should be a seemless upgrade (it was for me) - I have had no hic-ups with the APFS and it works fine with all my old drives that includes a really old windows (shared)drive - MS-DOS FAT32 drive that works like a charm

How is CS6 suites compatibility
I don't know the answer to this - my guess is that it may be a problem - since this is an opportunity to have Adobe CS users switch to the dreaded subscription license - I use Adobe Acrobat Pro a lot (Subscription) and hate the monthly fee but it works - kinda - with bugs here and there

FWIW - Microsoft 2011 still works fine (Mac OS warns me everytime i reboot) but after purchasing the 2016 version and not using it I am sticking with office 2011 even though I have 2016 installed.

IF Adobe CS is a deal breaker you might want to do more research - or consider Affinity?
 
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Fishrrman

macrumors P6
Feb 20, 2009
17,405
5,640
My advice and my opinion only.

If things are "running great" right now, maybe you ought to just "stay put".
The old saying.... "if it ain't broke....?"

Low Sierra is a mature OS, but Mojave (at least for some) seems like a "rough work in progress".
If you feel that you need to "move up", try High Sierra.

But again, particularly if you're running older software, it might be best to stay where you are, rather than leaping into the unknown.

If you DO want to try either HS or Mojave, I STRONGLY ADVISE you to use either CarbonCopyCloner or SuperDuper to create a bootable cloned backup of your drive first. That way, if something goes wrong, it's easy to "get back to where you once belonged". If you skip doing this, getting back is going to become A LOT more difficult!
 

MSastre

macrumors 6502a
Aug 18, 2014
534
216
I've got a late 2013 15" rMBP that runs the latest Mojave just fine. When I first transitioned to the new AFPS system with High Sierra, I made a bootable clone of my system drive (using SuperDuper, but CCC is just as good), also made a bootable HS usb installer (using Install Disk Creator), then used that to do a clean install of HS. I did fresh installs of all my Mac apps from the App Store, other non Apple apps from their sources or manually copied from my cloned system drive. All your other files can either be migrated, or you can take the time to decide which ones you want to keep or throw away. (I migrated my files) Not as much work as it sounds and I've had no problems with moving to the AFPS file system Apple now uses. You can probably skip High Sierra if you want to try Mojave, but definitely take Fisherrman's advise and make a bootable clone of your system before doing anything. You'll want that anyway for when the next OS comes out and 32 bit apps are no longer supported.
 

onlyremainingname

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jul 9, 2018
10
0
CAN & USA
Thanks for all the advice. I think I will give HS a try to start first since it will probably be a more stable OS to experiment with and clone my current system with CCC.