Silverlight on Mac

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by Sterlingholobyt, Jan 16, 2016.

  1. Sterlingholobyt, Jan 16, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2016

    Sterlingholobyt macrumors newbie

    Sterlingholobyt

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2013
    #1
    Do I need to install the latest plug-in for Silverlight if I upgrade my Mac to El Capitan?

    Netflix keeps prompting me that I need the plug-in for Silverlight(and now won't even let me "skip for now"), but I read that if you use Yosemite you don't need Silverlight anymore. So since I was also prompted to upgrade to El Capitan, I would like to avoid having yet another plug-in from Silverlight taking up space on my computer, and if upgrading to El Capitan(or even to Yosemite, I am still using Mavericks right now) would be enough, I would like to do that.

    Then again, should I even upgrade to El Capitan, or Yosemite... I am pretty satisfied with Mavericks.
     
  2. chscag macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Location:
    Fort Worth, Texas
    #2
    Silverlight only takes up 409 KB of space on your hard drive. Upgrade to El Capitan and then test whether you need it or not for Netflix.
     
  3. IHelpId10t5 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2014
    #3
    Silverlight has not been needed for Netflix for over a year now. Silverlight is a security threat and is rarely used on any modern websites so no need to reinstall it.
     
  4. Sterlingholobyt, Jan 16, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2016

    Sterlingholobyt thread starter macrumors newbie

    Sterlingholobyt

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2013
    #4
    I was thinking about upgrading to El Capitan. Just wondering if they have all the bugs out of it yet? That, and I am pretty happy with Mavericks so I saw no need to change.
    --- Post Merged, Jan 16, 2016 ---
    Apparently for some reason they still need it if you are using Mavericks, which I am.
     
  5. ApfelKuchen macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2012
    Location:
    Between the coasts
    #5
    Bugs exist. Always. And every new version of every OS ever made has been worse than the last (people who hate change will always complain about it). Waiting until "all the bugs are out" really means waiting until the remaining bugs affect too few users for the developer to bother with. Or, they've bumped the fix over into the next major revision of the OS, due to the time elapsed on the revision schedule (or the difficulty of engineering a fix in the time available). Some Mavericks bugs were addressed by Yosemite. There may even be some Mavericks bugs that were addressed in El Capitan.

    Of course, new versions of an OS bring new features, and new features bring new bugs. The question is whether those features are appealing, and whether you're willing to risk exposure to a bug in order to get them. Best way to avoid getting stung by a bee is to never sniff a flower.

    Wait long enough to upgrade, and you start getting hit by issues with obsolete software, or security patches that are simply not made. You will also encounter a stiffer learning curve - so many new features to assimilate, and some really useful ones may be missed because of it.

    Since OS X upgrades are now free, it's no longer about the money. For Apple, it's about adding ways to more deeply embed you in the ecosystem - new iCloud capabilities, Apple Music, greater integration between iOS devices and Macs... Have you ever been bothered that the SMS messages you receive on your iPhone don't appear in the Messages app on your Mac? Upgrade. Would you like to answer and place phone calls directly from your Mac? Upgrade. If you use multiple displays, you'll probably want to upgrade to get the improvements in Mission Control. If your browser session has ever been locked up by rogue pop-ups? Upgrade. Do you want to manage your iCloud documents from Finder (iCloud Drive)? Upgrade. And so on.
     
  6. Sterlingholobyt thread starter macrumors newbie

    Sterlingholobyt

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2013
    #6
    I've always found the best way is to look at the flower first to see if there is a bee on it.

    And that's part of it.
    I don't need, want, or use any of those things. I'm just a simple user who wants my computer to work when and where needed. An "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" kind of guy.
    I know what you are saying, though, and I thank you for your input.
     
  7. IHelpId10t5 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2014
    #7
    Nope. If you remove all versions of Silverlight then Netflix will instead use modern HTML5 instead. The OS version is not a factor.
     
  8. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #8
    OS X version is a factor and OP is correct. You need Yosemite or newer for HTML5 playback on OS X.

    https://help.netflix.com/en/node/23742
     
  9. tjwilliams25 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2014
    Location:
    Montana
    #9
    In order for Netflix to use the HTML5 player, you have to have Yosemite or higher, an i series processor, and the newest version of Safari. You may be able to use the HTML5 player in other browsers on Yosemite or newer, but Safari has it's own built in that is supposed to be more power efficient: http://www.apple.com/safari/. However, it is limited to the newer processors.
     

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