Simple Final Cut 5 question.

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by Airforcekid, Apr 29, 2010.

  1. Airforcekid macrumors 65816

    Airforcekid

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2008
    Location:
    United States of America
    #1
    If I rendered video saved on a flash drive removed it and the media went offline will I need to render it all again when I plug it back in? Also is there a way to speed up the render process im willing to sacrifice quality. Thanks
     
  2. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

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    Sep 7, 2008
    Location:
    forlod bygningen
    #2
    No, you don't need to render again.

    Why do you need to render the video in the first place? Is it because of some effect or because of the format and codec the video uses?

    To speed up the render process you might consider a faster storage medium though, as many flash memory drives have low read and write speeds like 10MB/s or so. A dedicated FW HDD will give you better results, but that may be too much if you only have one or four GB of video data. Even storing the video on the internal HDD would speed things up, even though it is not recommended to use the HDD with the OS stored onto to use as scratch drive for media files.

    Also make sure the sequence settings and the video and audio media files match in as many aspects as possible, foremost the codec, framerate and resolution. That will reduce render times and even the necessity to render at all.
     
  3. Airforcekid thread starter macrumors 65816

    Airforcekid

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2008
    Location:
    United States of America
    #3
    Thanks I had to rip some video from youtube in .mp4 it wouldnt preview without being rendered.
     
  4. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
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    forlod bygningen
    #4
    To circumvent that, use MPEG Streamclip to convert the video to .mov using the DV or Apple Intermediate Codec (AIC). If you have FCP, you should also have the QuickTime MPEG-2 Playback Component, which enables you to directly open the ripped DVD (not the one in the optical drive, if it has some kind of copy protection) in MPEG Streamclip, which would save you one transcoding process.

    .mp4 files use the H264 codec, which is not meant for editing, thus there is no Sequence Setting for it and thus you have to render. H264 encoded video does not store every frame, something editing applications desperately need to edit properly.
     

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