Simple Question, Complex Fix???

Discussion in 'iMac' started by SchmashinPrunes, Mar 11, 2017.

  1. SchmashinPrunes macrumors newbie

    SchmashinPrunes

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2017
    Location:
    South Carolina
    #1
    Here goes.

    My plan for this summer is to build a gaming PC. Run Windows 10 on it, but I also would want MacOS on that machine. My solution for that was to get 2 128GB SSD's to install each OS independently and multi-boot like that. I was told by my IT teacher that wouldn't work, yet I see no reason why it wouldn't. Any input here?
     
  2. DeltaMac macrumors G3

    DeltaMac

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
    Location:
    Delaware
    #2
    If you have a Mac (such as an iMac), then you can have macOS, and use the Bootcamp assistant to create a second partition dedicated to a Windows install. macOS comes with that capability, and you don't need to have a second drive installed to do that dual-boot.

    If you are building a custom PC, Windows will be no problem, of course
    You can then check on web sites that specialize in building a hackintosh (any PC running macOS on non-Apple hardware) for some good tips on various levels of hardware, and how to install macOS on that hardware.
    Here's a popular place to start
     
  3. SchmashinPrunes thread starter macrumors newbie

    SchmashinPrunes

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2017
    Location:
    South Carolina
    #3
    So basically it has to be on that list and it should run? I was planning on getting a Gigabyte motherboard, i5 6600k, GTX 1050Ti, and 16Gb ram...
     
  4. DeltaMac macrumors G3

    DeltaMac

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
    Location:
    Delaware
    #4
    Nope.
    If you read a bit on that site, you will find that those are merely motherboards that have been used and tested in that configuration. It's a method to make macOS run on non-Apple hardware a process where you can hopefully rely on what other users have done. It's because the drivers that Apple has provided in the macOS system, although fairly capable, are made for Apple-only, and not universal drivers, and a lot of hardware needs some hacks to be fully functional (or at least mostly functional) when using the macOS. Some installs of macOS are fairly straightforward, other hardware can be not so easy. The idea of the lists of supported parts is to help someone with not much experience in bending the macOS to work with non-Apple hardware. Choose from the list. Follow the steps. Should be easy.
    You COULD ask in the forums on that site, if you have questions about specific hardware, such as the particular model of Gigabyte motherboard that you want to use. There may be folks there with personal experiences with that exact hardware that you can get some help...
     

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