single image HDR

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by marclapierre13, Dec 8, 2007.

  1. marclapierre13 macrumors 6502a

    marclapierre13

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    #1
    I was trying to create a single image HDR, but no luck.

    I have one image that is a JPEG, and on PS CS3 it wont let me do single file HDR, but on Photomatrix it has a "single file conversion" option. When I click it, and select my image folder, then my image, it will say something like batch error?
    I tried it also with a RAW image from my Samsung GX-1S, but it wont work with that either.

    Lil help and knowledge please?:apple:
     
  2. valdore macrumors 65816

    valdore

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Location:
    Kansas City, Missouri. USA
    #2
    I can point you to Pete Carr's HDR tutorial at www.vanilladays.com - go there and click on HDR Tutorial.

    I do HDR from a single RAW all the time; here's what I do (and basically the same thing Pete Carr does...)

    Split the RAW into three (or more) versions in Aperture, in general, one normally exposed shot, and then an underexposed at -2 exposure bias, and +2 exposure bias. Export those into a folder, with NO metadata included (Aperture>Presets). Supposedly you're supposed to export as TIFFs, but it seems to work fine with exporting into JPEG form as far as I can tell.

    Open Photomatix Pro, combine the versions, then go into tone mapping and use the tone mapping editor to get as close as you can to the effect you are looking for.

    I tried doing it from a single JPEG once, and it didn't turn out all that great because of the inflexibility of JPEG compression for image editing/altering.

    I'm not too fond of the HDR function in Photoshop CS3. Photomatix Pro allows for far more creative control.
     
  3. marclapierre13 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    marclapierre13

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    #3
    just the man who I was directing this thread at :)

    Ok, so I didnt even realize you made 3 duplicates of the same image, by just making it more underexposed and overexposed.

    I know I usually do auto bracketing when I try to do HDR photos. But when you said you take image from one RAW it got me interested.

    So I have 1 psd image (photo shop image). How do I make it -2, and another +2? I know how to export it after as a JPEG or TIFF though(save as...):rolleyes:
     
  4. valdore macrumors 65816

    valdore

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Location:
    Kansas City, Missouri. USA
    #4
    If you're working with Photoshop for instance, I believe you can simply assign the varying exposure values by going: Photoshop>Image>Adjustments>Exposure, then use the slider or type in the +2, 0, and -2 into the Exposure box, saving each one to subsequently combine in Photomatix.

    If using Aperture, select all three different exposure versions and export them together at the same time... :)
     
  5. marclapierre13 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    marclapierre13

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    #5
    Hey.
    So after reading that guide on the first page, it says that to do a 1 image HDR, you just go "open" and select the image.
    DUH to me! lol
    EDIT: This is all done using HDR in Photomatrix Pro. Except the pre-HDR steps, those are done in PS

    So valdore, is that what you do for your photos, take 1 image, and then take it to PS or aperture and change the exposure there? (according to the guide, 3 images and autobracketing gives more detail and what not than just 1 image, like "open" method.)

    Neither of these are HDR, but shot originally in JPEG
    The first HDR is taken as the "open" method, just 1 image
    The 2nd is with -2,0,+2 exposure of 1 image.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. valdore macrumors 65816

    valdore

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Location:
    Kansas City, Missouri. USA
    #6
    In Photomatix, I do this....

    HDR>Generate>Browse, then select the different exposures of the same photo, then click OK. It will then merge the differently exposed versions together. After that is done, go HDR>Tone Mapping, and the tone mapping editor will come up, which allows you to make your creative adjustments.

    Just selecting one file to process in Photomatix will not do anything, other than just regurgitating a copy of the one file - gotta have three or more to merge.

    It's true that a traditional HDR (with three or more source images straight from the camera) provides more data for the HDR editor to work with, so often times this will yield better results. However this can be problematic if anything is moving in your photo- cars, people walking around, birds flying over, even traffic lights changing from green to yellow to red. The HDR from a single RAW method eliminates those problems, and is often "good enough" in my estimation compared to multiple source images bracketed straight from the camera.

    If I'm shooting with multiple bracketed exposures straight from the camera, then there is no need to use Aperture or Photoshop to assign different exposure biases, as that base is already covered with the different exposures straight out of the camera. But if it's one RAW, I use Aperture to create three versions of the same photo, each with separate exposure biases.

    :)
     
  7. marclapierre13 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    marclapierre13

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    #7
    tnxs!
    I think i will take all these tips along with that guide and just keep practicing. Ill come back to this thread If I ever have any other questions,tnxs for the help:)

    1 last question for tonight: hdr> generate vs automate>batch processing?
     
  8. valdore macrumors 65816

    valdore

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Location:
    Kansas City, Missouri. USA
    #8
    No problem. :)

    HDR>Generate -- this method means you have to make each HDR one at a time.

    Automate>Batch Processing -- allows you to run all the source images in a folder at once, saving time.

    Beware of batch processing with HDR, only because you cannot do the individual tweaking and fine tuning to each HDR image this way, as it uses the same tone mapping settings on all photos, and often times it's not a one size fits all scenario. The slow way of doing it one at a time will take a lot longer, but it's worth it in my opinion because of the variations from composition to composition.
     
  9. Butthead macrumors 6502

    Butthead

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    #9
    Tis a 'gimmic' for not doing proper multi-exposure HDR technique. Best single shot HDR is to buy a Fuji S5 Pro (only applies to Nikon lens owners I know), but even that only gets you so far. Can just hope Fuji or someone else pioneers even wider DR sensors sometime in the near future.
     
  10. M@lew macrumors 68000

    M@lew

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2006
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #11
    I don't think anyone mentioned this but:

    You can't make an HDR from 1 jpeg. Only 1 RAW as the tonal range is killed when a jpeg is created.
     

Share This Page