Sir Terry Prachett RIP Aged 66

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Scepticalscribe, Mar 12, 2015.

  1. Scepticalscribe, Mar 12, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2015

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #1
    Death of Sir Terry Prachett Aged 66

    Just spotted the very sad news that the death of Sir Terry Prachett - one of my favourite authors - has occurred.

    As any of those who loved his work (most notably the fantastic Discworld series) well knows, he wrote terrific, sharp, hilarious and yet fiercely compassionate satire.

    (Along with coming up with some wonderfully strong female characters, too, Granny Weatherwax and Nanny Ogg ranking as two of my favourite female characters in all of fiction.)

    In recent years, he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's - a soul destroying and personality annihilating condition - but faced this challenge with his characteristic courage, dignity and an unusual degree of openness, enabling others to discuss the difficulties of having to deal with this condition more readily.

    Anyone who loved the Discworld series will remember how hilarious, witty, inventive and utterly memorable some of the characters and stories were. And yet Sir Terry always remarked that they were nothing on his days with the British nuclear industry, where he had worked for a while as a press officer……..

    A sad day for fantasy, imagination, generosity and thoroughly enjoyable, highly imaginative and sidesplittingly hilarious (yet humane) satire; a very sad day too, for his family, friends, and fans.

    His last tweets are superb. And entirely in character, witty, wry, brave……and wonderfully original and warm.

    RIP Sir Terry; you'll be missed.
     
  2. keithneese macrumors newbie

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    #2


    He was one of my favorite authors as well. I lost a grandparent 7 years ago to Alzheimer's, and I think that the best way to describe that disease is "A long goodbye". Thoughts go out to his family.
     
  3. Scepticalscribe, Mar 12, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2015

    Scepticalscribe thread starter Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #3
    Well, my mother has currently well and truly embarked on her long journey and what you rightly call the 'long goodbye', - it is an appalling condition - so I write from personal experience on this one.

    However, I always liked Sir Terry Prachett, both the man and his effervescent, witty, inventive and supremely life-affirming writing.

    If you want the mental equivalent of a pick-me-up, the sort of writing that will leave a grin on your face, while your mind salutes the brio of a true maestro, where prose, character and story all meet in a morality tale delivered with stiletto sharpness, and savage wit yet infused with deep humanity - Terry Prachett 's Discworld is an excellent place to start....

    I loved his stuff.
     
  4. keithneese macrumors newbie

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    #4

    You have described his writing perfectly there. The first book I read by him was "Going Postal". I think I will spend this weekend reading it again.

    My thoughts go out to you as well, in regards to your mother.
     
  5. D.T. macrumors 603

    D.T.

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    #5
    Sad. I knew he was ill and continuing as best as he could (followed him on FB), I'm a big fan of just about everything he wrote.

    One of my favorites was his wickedly funny collaboration with Neil Gaiman (another of my faves), Good Omens.

    From Gaiman's blog:

     
  6. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    #6
    RIP Terry, the world just got a smaller and colder place, I feel as if I have lost a friend.

    I started to read his books in the 1980's, Small God's remains a true classic.
     
  7. Mousse macrumors 68000

    Mousse

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    #7
    NOOOOOOoooo!!!!!*:(:(:( I have always liked the City Watch series, although I'm not a fan of Samuel Vimes--too Gary Stu for my taste. I always been partial to Sgt Fred Colon.

    *multiple exclamation points. A sure sign of a diseased mind.;) (in Eric, Reaper Man and Maskerade.
     
  8. Scepticalscribe, Mar 12, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2015

    Scepticalscribe thread starter Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #8
    Agreed, re the City Watch series; excellent, (and I liked Lancre, too).

    Actually, I actually rather liked Sam Vimes (Sir Terry Prachett had remarked that he and Granny Weatherwax were individuals who were on the side of good - or who had found themselves on the side of good, or felt they had to be on the side of good, - yet found themselves battling 'the darkness within' as they didn't 'feel' themselves to be on the side of good.)

    Yes, I liked Sgt Fred Colon, too, and loved the breath-taking yet fearsome innocence of Constable, later Sergeant and Captain Carrot; loved Angua, too.)

    Ah, Masquerade; that was simply hilarious...

     
  9. JamesMike macrumors demi-god

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    #9
    Sorry to hear of his passing, Discworld brought smiles to my face. It has been awhile since I have read his works, when I have time will have to revisit his works.
     
  10. r.harris1 macrumors 6502a

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    #10
    A very sad day indeed! One of my all time favorite writers and in fact, I'm reading Guards! Guards! at the moment, which I love to bits and have read many times. Not too long ago, I finished re-reading Witches Abroad, another fantastic book. My wife and I both always have a Pratchett to hand it seems, in and amongst our other reads.

    Woof. The world has lost a fantastic light.
     
  11. Scepticalscribe, Mar 13, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2015

    Scepticalscribe thread starter Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #11
    'Witches Abroad' is hilarious, but 'Wyrd Sisters' is simply superlative.
     
  12. roadbloc macrumors G3

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    #12
    :(

    My regards to his loved ones. Godspeed Sir Prachett.
     
  13. Mousse macrumors 68000

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    #13
    I always felt those to characters were way, WAY over powered. I'd bet they could even beat Blind Io if he ever dared to challenge them.:eek: The only person in Disc World who could beat them would be Lord Vetinari. Well, not in a straight up contest, but the man is always 10 steps ahead of everyone else would manipulate them into defeating themselves.

    In Guards! Guards!, Lord Vetinari has himself locked in his own dungeon and has Vimes deal with things. The kicker is the dungeon door is locked from the INSIDE!:eek: He has the key and can leave when ever he wants.:p
     
  14. vkd macrumors 6502a

    vkd

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    #14
    Time now for millions of people to move on and spend their free time reading something actually useful in life - rather than fantasy. I suggest Bhagavad-gita As It Is or The Science Of Self-Realization, both by A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami.
     
  15. Mousse macrumors 68000

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    #15
    A ridiculous statement. Should we also stop eating delicious bacon and eat only healthy oatmeal? Or maybe spend all our time working instead of wasting it on useless stuff like vacations?

    Since the won't be another Disc World novel, I will move on to reading a different series. The Game of Thrones series is highly entertaining. I have yet to see a single episode, but I'm pretty up to date on the novels. I can't wait for the next book to find out which High Lord is the next to die.
     
  16. theluggage macrumors 68030

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    #16
    Let me guess, Available for Only $AM35 - and that's cutting me own throat. Free sausage inna bun with every copy? Is that you, Mr Dibbler?

    There's actually a lot of Humanist "headology" in the pages of Pratchett. I wouldn't go too far, but there are worse places to get life-affirming inspiration from. Plus, there are few things more useful and better for the psyche than a good laugh.

    Mind you, this is Terry Pratchett we're talking about. Being rendered incapable of writing by a horrible brain disease didn't stop him writing books, so the guy with the scythe has got his work cut out. If nobody starts receiving new Pratchett novels via ouija board within the next three months I would take it as final and irrevocable proof that there is no afterlife.

    Seriously, though: they said on the radio that there was one more book in the pipeline - after "Raising Steam" - that he completed last summer. That will be an emotional read.
     
  17. Mal67 macrumors 6502a

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    #17
    I came to the Discworld books later and kick myself for not getting into them sooner. I have read all of them and loved everyone of them. They are just wonderful to read. He will be greatly missed but always fondly remembered.
     
  18. Scepticalscribe, Mar 13, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2015

    Scepticalscribe thread starter Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #18
    Ah, well, what can I say? Actually, what I used to say to my students was that I wanted to be Granny Weatherwax (and not just wanted to be like her) when I grew up.......

    Re Lord Vetinari, (and the dungeon, and I do remember that story), I always thought that was a simple case of letting others do the dirty work......and if their imminent mortality became more pronounced as a consequence, well, actions have consequences....


    Oh, for goodness' sake.

    What on earth is wrong with reading both? Reading - and relishing, savouring, and deriving savage enjoyment from - one form of literature does not necessarily exclude being able to appreciate and several other forms at the same time.

    And I am one of those who thinks that as long as kids (or adults) read anything (and everything) their enjoyment of and appreciation for literature cannot but be enhanced.
     
  19. vkd macrumors 6502a

    vkd

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    #19
    Nothing wrong. I am simply an opportunist :)
     
  20. r.harris1 macrumors 6502a

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    #20
    Yes! Truly LOVE Wyrd Sisters. There are so many exquisite books that I will always enjoy. I came at Pratchett in an odd sort of way only recently (2009-ish). My wife said, "Hey, I've read about this Pratchett fellow, maybe get me some books for Christmas", so I went to our favorite local used book shop and got her The Truth and Thud. The Truth was my very first and it was absolutely fantastic. And then we both just started sucking up all of them we could read - we've got them all now. Ugh. Death sucks.
     
  21. Grey Beard macrumors 65816

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