Skylake U-Series - i5 vs i7

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Yoshimura, Nov 18, 2016.

  1. Yoshimura, Nov 18, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2016

    Yoshimura macrumors regular

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    #1
  2. skids929 macrumors 6502a

    skids929

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    #2
  3. vatter69 macrumors 6502a

    vatter69

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    #3
    Same with the Skylakes used for the 13 TB model. Only difference is 50 Mhz max clock on the GPU.

    http://ark.intel.com/compare/91164,91166,91167

    Thats why i picked the 3.1 Ghz i5 over the i7. They are virtual identical beside 200 Mhz clock and for the price difference i got 16GB Ram.
     
  4. deadworlds, Nov 18, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2016

    deadworlds macrumors 6502a

    deadworlds

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    #4
    There is more to a CPUs performance than just clock speed. Examples include: cache levels, chache size, CPU architecture, power draw etc.


    Intel didn't give two processors from the same family different names simply to differentiate between clock speeds.


    Great article on what caches do
    http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/...-why-theyre-an-essential-part-of-modern-chips



    This article, a bit down the page shows a table comparing the sky late U-series i7 and i5 processors. http://wccftech.com/intel-skylake-u...-intel-iris-graphics-variants-arrive-q1-2016/
     
  5. vatter69 macrumors 6502a

    vatter69

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    #6
    I totally agree however in this Skylake series for the 13" i fail to spot any difference between i5 and i7 or the spec website is wrong.

     
  6. MacBH928 macrumors 68030

    MacBH928

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    #7
    i never understood the difference between i3 i5 and i7.
    There are also some funny upgrades, if you pay just $100 more they will upgrade your CPU from 2.9GHz to 3.1 . Is 200MHz really worth it?
    and for $300 you can upgrade 400mhz more to 3.3GHz .

    On Amazon you can get an i7 4GHz CPU for the same price, not an upgrade.
     
  7. pookitoo macrumors regular

    pookitoo

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    #8
    I've read this article and we can see some difference between i5 and I7 : (dual core so for the 13 ")
    - i5 : 3-6 mb cache size & i7 : 4-8mb
    - i5 : no hyper threading & i7 : hyper threading
    - i5 little lower graphic card than the i7

    And when I'm going to macbench :
    - Macbook 13 tb 2016 i5 : single : 3716 & dual : 7386
    - Macbook 13 tb 2016 i7 : single : 4005 & dual : 7941

    almost 10 % is not nothing when you see the little bump spec from intel year after year. (and almost 10 % of the price)

    I'm not sure to understand everything but according to me the upgrade worth it ?
     
  8. Wowereit, Nov 19, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2016

    Wowereit macrumors 6502a

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    #9
    Both are running 2 cores with hyperthreading enabled, so a maximum of 4 threads.
    Both come with 4 MB cache and the same iGPU.

    It's clockspeed, just plain simple clockspeed.
    If you won't believe me, you will certainly believe Intel.
    http://ark.intel.com/compare/91156,91169

    It's the same exact CPU just clocked a little bit higher.
     
  9. pookitoo macrumors regular

    pookitoo

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    #10
    Yes you're right ! So strange ! Why they call I5 and i7 if the only difference is clock speed ;( Only marketing again !!!

    Thank a lot to give us some info because I 'm really afraid to have any regret with the i5 ! (I'm in EU and I have a week before receiving mine)
    686 x 326
     
  10. Wowereit, Nov 19, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2016

    Wowereit macrumors 6502a

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    #11
    Intel is making very easy profits by selling the same chip for 100$ more and Apple will gladly buy them with mass discount for 70$ more and sell them for 300$ more.

    I've edited my first post to include the exact CPUs Apple is using.
    It doesn't change the conclusion at all, just wanted to make it 100% right.
     
  11. Fl0r!an macrumors 6502a

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    Aug 14, 2007
    #12
    i7's are higher binned, so they can reach higher clock speeds within same thermal envelope. Additionally, Intel is selling partly defective CPUs as lower-end versions by disabling parts of the hardware (e.g. parts of cache or some cores).

    The two mentioned CPUs don't seem to differ at all besides clock speed, so yes, that's basically it. The only i7 "feature" in this case is the ability to run stable with the specced clock speed with a specified core voltage.

    This is just a result of the manufacturing process. Depending on the yields, Intel is adjusting features and prices for the CPUs so they don't have to throw the junk away (they'll just sell it as "i3" or even worse, as Pentium or Celeron).
     

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