Small Room = Use smcFanControl?

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by thriii, Apr 7, 2011.

  1. thriii macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    #1
    I just moved into a new place and my bedroom is smaller than it used to be and where my room is its best to keep my window/door closed. Since its a smaller space I can really feel the heat from the Mac Pro to where I start sweating sometimes. I got smcFanControl and my current settings are:

    PCI: 1000RPM
    PS: 1000RPM
    EXHAUST: 1200 RPM
    INTAKE: 1400RPM
    BOOSTA: 1300RPM

    the noise is fine but I was wondering if this was too much for idle speeds? I wouldnt mind making them higher so I can cool the Mac Pro down some more, but I dont know what RPM I should keep these different fans under. Any suggestions?

    If I use smcFanControl will the fans still speed up when they need to? I don't want to mess up with the way the Mac Pro reacts when things get too hot like if I were to watch a flash video but I do need the system cooler somehow..

    I have a 2.66 Quad-Core 2009 Mac Pro with 6GB DDR3 RAM

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. DanielCoffey macrumors 65816

    DanielCoffey

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Location:
    Edinburgh, UK
    #2
    If the MP is heating up your room, increasing the fan speeds won't cool it down any more unless you can somehow get the heat *out* of your room. You need to increase the ventilation in the room, not the MP.

    All smcFanControl does is increase the minimum fan speed. If the MP heats up and the temperature profile tells it to run the fans more it will. As you stop work and the temps drop, the fan speeds will automatically drop but only to the new minimums you have set in smcFanControl.
     
  3. Vylen macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2010
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #3
    Either open your window (and install a fly-screen if you don't have one) or buy a small de-humidifier.

    The latter will raise electricity bills but it'll keep you cool too.

    Because as the above poster said, you want to get the heat *out* of your room. You can increase the fan-speed all you want, but the fans are essentially blowing warm air around your machine. While it'll be cooler than stagnant air, it'll just make things warmer again and keep going.
     
  4. thriii thread starter macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    #4
    thx 4 the replies! i didnt knwo a dehumidifier could be used like that.. ill look into all the suggestions.. i have a fly screen for my window its just super loud outside and its distractin so ijust mkeep it closed.. thanks again!
     
  5. DanielCoffey macrumors 65816

    DanielCoffey

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2010
    Location:
    Edinburgh, UK
    #5
    I don't really see how a dehumidifier would help cool the room. I have one and their job is to remove water from the air and usually generate heat as they work.

    Maybe you meant an air conditioner? Again, those would generate cool air but the heat they extract from the air would need to be dumped somewhere else.
     
  6. Vylen macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2010
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #6
    Yea, I guess I see a lot of combined dehumidifier/air-conditioner standalone unites that I automatically type dehumidifier :p

    As for the heat they extract, well, usually they have the big tubing that goes from the unit and ideally to the window. And done, nice cool room with low humidity. OP has mentioned he has a window in the room :p so all good heh.
     
  7. CaoCao macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2010
    #7
    dehumidifiers help you feel cooler because humidity makes you feel warmer. Ultimately you have to get the heat out of the room
     
  8. nanofrog macrumors G4

    Joined:
    May 6, 2008
    #8
    If opening a door or window isn't an option, such as in a really hot climate, then a window Air Conditioner would be the way to go (aka a window shaker in the US :p).

    I had to this myself, and it does work (will raise the power bill though, as Vylen mentioned). Just make sure you don't get too big a unit (won't cool properly if you do, and it uses more power).

    Consumer reports has an AC size calculation page that should help you figure out the right unit for your needs. ;)
     

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