SMB2 Connection, Upgrading OS X

Discussion in 'macOS' started by nope7308, Oct 8, 2014.

  1. nope7308 macrumors 65816

    nope7308

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    #1
    I use an SMB2 connection to share files between OS X and Windows 8.1 over wifi. For whatever reason, the connection is painfully slow, especially when I initiate the file transfer from OS X; it will take about 10-15 minutes to transfer just 1GB of data. The speed triples when I initiate the file transfer from Windows 8.1, taking about 5 minutes to transfer 1GB of data. From what I've read, this is because OS X has poorly implemented the SMB2 transfer protocol (if that makes sense).

    I'm just wondering if there's any legitimate workaround to this issue (other than reverting to SMB), and if it will be corrected with the upcoming release of OS X Yosemite.

    Speaking of which, I anticipate that I will upgrade to Yosemite anyhow, and I'm wondering if I should do a clean install, or simply install over Mavericks. Is it really worth the trouble of reinstalling all your programs, reconfiguring settings, etc? I'm just looking for honest advice.

    Thanks!
     
  2. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

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    The Finger Lakes Region
    #2
    Are young the smb connection string or the CIFS string instead?
     
  3. nope7308 thread starter macrumors 65816

    nope7308

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    #3
    I don't understand the question...

    Basically, I set up file sharing in OS X with the SMB2 connection instead of the previous AFP standard. I just followed your typical online tutorial, and while the file sharing does work, it's painfully slow. I've read this has a lot to do with the SMB2 implementation in Mavericks, so I'm wondering if there's a workaround or if this will be corrected in Yosemite.
     
  4. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

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    #4
    The cifs String is a way to force SMB2 in 10.8+ to use SMB1 instead of SMB2 because of licensing terms in GPLv3, they even talked about Like in the article Apple to drop Samba networking tools from Lion.

    Plus AFP has been replaced in Mavericks+ by SMB2. You can read about it in the article When Apple needs speed and security in Mac OS X, it turns to Microsoft.

    Lastly you never said what your less speeds or frequency is. Anything will be slow over a bad wireless network.
     
  5. chrfr macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2009
    #5
    AFP has not been replaced by SMB2. SMB2 is now the default, but AFP is there and works the same as it has. AFP continues to exist in Yosemite as well, but SMB moves to SMB3. Expect a whole new set of issues.
     
  6. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

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    #6
    Ok I swerved up. I should have said they prioritized SMB2. Thanks for pointing out my errors. :rolleyes:
     
  7. nope7308, Oct 14, 2014
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2014

    nope7308 thread starter macrumors 65816

    nope7308

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    #7
    I have the technological expertise of a grandmother, so please go very, very slow...

    I do not use the CIFS string to revert back to SMB1 because that would slow the transfer rate considerably, albeit with a more reliable connection. From what I've read online, those that employ this workaround are usually experiencing connectivity issues, whereas my problem is almost exclusively slow transfer speeds (although the connection sometimes drops from the MBP).

    As for speeds, I have an Apple Airport Extreme that was purchased about a year ago, so it should be plenty fast. There's only two people on the local network at any given time, and since I'm the only one who downloads anything, I know I'm not competing for bandwidth. Curiously, the transfer rate is about 3x faster if initiated from Windows 8.1; when I initiate the transfer from OS X, it takes considerably longer to connect and then transfer the files.

    I don't know the exact transfer speeds off-hand, but if memory serves me correctly, I believe I max out at about 8/sec on Windows 8.1, and about 5/sec on OS X 10.9. That said, there will be several 'lulls' during the transfer, where speeds will dip below 1/sec, sometimes stopping entirely for about a minute.

    To use a concrete example, if I have to transfer a 1.5GB mkv file, it will take about 3-5 minutes if initiated from the PC, and about 5-8 minutes if initiated from the MBP. Also, I should mention that I transfer the files between desktop environments (both are on SSD) rather than my dedicated storage drive (HDD).

    Thoughts?

    P.S. MBP and Airport have AC wireless, whereas the Desktop has N.
    P.P.S. What can I realistically expect with SMB3/Yosemite? Any improvement, or more frustration? And why?
     
  8. iolinux333 macrumors 68000

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  9. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

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    #9
    Ok I just want to know if the AirPort Extreme is the tall one or the short one.
     
  10. nope7308, Oct 15, 2014
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2014

    nope7308 thread starter macrumors 65816

    nope7308

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    #10
    It's the tall one.

    I'm not sure if Apple has released multiple versions, but if so, my router is the first version of the tall design.
     
  11. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

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    #11
    OK. Then hold down your 'option' key on the Finder menu wireless icon. It then will show you connected frequency.

    Plus go into your System Preferences->Network pane, Advanced button. There clear out any other wireless network you have connected to and save. Plus when you go to the Windows 8 computer use the Finder Connect to Server instead of the side bar icon. See if you mount the Windows share it will speed up.
     
  12. nope7308 thread starter macrumors 65816

    nope7308

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    #12
    I'm not currently at home, but I'll attempt this later tonight.

    Just to be clear, I have maybe 3 saved networks on the MBP. Are you asking me to remove the saved wireless networks? The PC has only been connected to my home wireless network.

    I have a shortcut on both computers to mount the drive, so I just double-click and wait for the finder/window to open. I don't use whatever 'side bar' icon you referenced. Also, what do you mean by 'Finder Connect to Server'? I'm so confused.
     
  13. satcomer macrumors 603

    satcomer

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Location:
    The Finger Lakes Region
    #13
    It's under the Finder menu item 'Go' or using the Command button+k method and putting in the SMB or AFP string.
     
  14. nope7308, Oct 17, 2014
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2014

    nope7308 thread starter macrumors 65816

    nope7308

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2008
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    #14
    Sorry for the delay, but I opted to install Yosemite first. Long story short, I believe I fixed the problem (or Apple did).

    There was a separate issue of Keychain not populating the user id/pw correctly (it was an email), so first I had to rename the Microsoft Account to change the login credentials. I then re-established the SMB connection in Yosemite, but I connected to the server (aka Windows) by specifying the hostname. I then made an alias of the shared folder, put a shortcut in the dock, and now it functions like a native folder -- no login prompt whatsoever. :D

    I presume Yosemite defaults to SMB3 because the connection is now much more secure/responsive, and the transfer speeds have also increased. I just transferred 3.5GB of data in about 6-7 minutes, whereas it previously took about 10 minutes to transfer 1GB of data in Mavericks. Oh, and I was transferring the file to the storage HDD, and not the OS SSD like I did previously.

    Moral of the story: Yosemite is significantly better at SMB than Mavericks.
     

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