Snap!! iMac makes noise, screen goes black, dead. What to do?

Discussion in 'iMac' started by GlennH, Jun 7, 2008.

  1. GlennH macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2007
    #1
    Turned on the iMac a little while ago for the first time in a week (we were away). After it was turned on for about 10 minutes we heard a SNAP! sound, the screen went black and the iMac was dead. Can't turn it on at all.

    It was plugged in to a UPS which is still fine; there are no power problems. I tried plugging it directly to the wall socket just in case, still dead. It almost sounded like a static electricity "event" but nobody was actually touching the computer when it happened.

    This is an Intel iMac 2.8 GHz, purchased late November 2007 from apple.com. So it's out of the 90-day tech support period, but within the 1-year warranty. I got it with 1GB of RAM, but installed 4GB of Crucial RAM later. Unfortunately, I had no backup drive installed yet (that was in the works), but I really don't have much on the drive yet, so not a big deal for data loss, if it came to that.

    So, what's the procedure? Do I call Apple to arrange for an appointment to take it to the Apple store (about 20 miles away)? Do I call the Apple Store directly? I don't want to be charged for any tech support on this.
     
  2. gehrbox macrumors 65816

    gehrbox

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2007
    Location:
    Charleston,SC
    #2
    If you have an Apple store nearby make an appointment. If not call Apples support line to get it returned for repair.

    I had a 17" Powerbook that the "N" key popped off on the last week of the one year warranty. I called Apple on a Tuesday afternoon (Eastern time). Wednesday morning an empty shipping box arrived at my office via DHL overnight. I packed the laptop in the box per the included instructions and called DHL to pickup the box. They picked it up the same day. Friday morning of the same week DHL showed up at my office with my Powerbook repaired. Apple not only replaced the keyboard, but also 2 missing rubber feet from the bottom and cleaned it up to the point it looked new again.

    I never had such a good service experience.
     
  3. GlennH thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2007
    #3
    Just wanted to close the loop on this post for the record.

    I took my dead iMac to The Apple Store on Monday June 9. They told me it was probably a bad power supply. Unfortunately none in stock, so they ordered it, said it should take no more than a week to get and fix. Nine days later (June 18) they called to say the power supply didn't take care of the problem entirely. They suspected the logic board and possibly a cable were affected too. So, they needed to order them. Called again on Friday June 20. Logic board installed, progress being made but they thought the cable still needed replaced, would take a little longer. This I didn't understand, since they had mentioned the cable earlier and I thought it was being ordered too. Anyway, finally, Wed June 25 it's fixed and I go back to get it.

    So, they had it for 16 days, replaced 3 components, and it works like new. No cost to me (except my time and expense to go there twice). No data lost. I'm glad it's working now, but wish it hadn't taken so long. I don't understand why the local Apple Stores wouldn't have common components for repair of current models in stock, or why it takes so long to get them.

    Based on this failure after 6 months of use I'm leaning more towards paying for Apple Care before the one-year warranty is up.
     
  4. The Hammer macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2008
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    #4
    I think I'd be doing more than just leaning in that direction based on your experience.
     
  5. TuffLuffJimmy macrumors G3

    TuffLuffJimmy

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2007
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #5
    because they're a retail store, not a repair shop.
     
  6. marcre macrumors regular

    marcre

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Location:
    East coast
    #6
    It is nearly impossible for the store to stock all the parts. They order the part they need and then test, if they need another then it is a longer wait. Definitely a pain, at least it didn't cost anything.


    Id go with Apple Care if I were you. It gives you a three year piece of mind.
     
  7. maestrokev macrumors 6502a

    maestrokev

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2007
    Location:
    Canada
    #7
    Do you know how much this repair would have cost if not under warranty? That's the problem with all in one units, you can't do it yourself.
     
  8. gehrbox macrumors 65816

    gehrbox

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2007
    Location:
    Charleston,SC
    #8
    If you have basic computer assembly skills AND can get the parts you can repair one. The current iMac line is much more suitable for self repair then the G4 iMac's. Access is fairly easy and none of the construction is unusual.
     
  9. SaSaSushi macrumors 68040

    SaSaSushi

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2007
    Location:
    Takamatsu, Japan
    #9
    Get Applecare. It's only $120 for the iMac from L.A. Computer and is FAR preferable to opening and servicing the machine yourself, no matter what your level of service expertise.

    It's even cheaper if you get it on eBay. ;)
     
  10. gehrbox macrumors 65816

    gehrbox

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2007
    Location:
    Charleston,SC
    #10
    There's no question that AppleCare is they way to go. But lacking AppleCare, they are repairable be anyone with technical skills sufficient to build a PC from parts.
     
  11. SaSaSushi macrumors 68040

    SaSaSushi

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2007
    Location:
    Takamatsu, Japan
    #11
    I get the impression you're a repair tech who does this sort of thing for a living, Bud. As a system-building hobbyist who has built dozens of PCs in my time I can tell you that opening up an Intel iMac for servicing is another matter entirely. You're talking about dozens and dozens of torx screws and very tightly packed components that can be daunting to put back exactly as they are removed. A PC is designed to be user-accessed, an iMac is most definitely not. Obviously, I'm not saying it's impossible but neither is it a job for anyone with the skills to build a PC from parts, sorry.
     

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