snow in the clouds

pmtm2

macrumors member
Original poster
Dec 1, 2009
32
0
is there still hope we my see a snow leopard updated that has i cloud???????
 

pmtm2

macrumors member
Original poster
Dec 1, 2009
32
0
HAHA Sorry i think snow leopard is a far better os then lion right now. If microsoft users get i cloud then so should snow leopard users that have paid good money for their macbooks and i macs!!!!!!!!
 

rmhop81

macrumors 68020
Apr 4, 2005
2,243
90
Dallas, TX
HAHA Sorry i think snow leopard is a far better os then lion right now. If microsoft users get i cloud then so should snow leopard users that have paid good money for their macbooks and i macs!!!!!!!!
4 balls is a walk....3 strikes is an out.
 

GrandHamster

macrumors newbie
Mar 22, 2012
2
0
This is a rather huge issue actually

Having spent time talking to everyone at Apple that would talk to me: No, you won't get iCloud supported in SL.
Yes, you MUST buy Lion to get the "free" iCloud update.
No, Lion doesn't support Rosetta (so forget your older software) and doesn't support a lot of hardware.
Yes, Lion will take away a lot of the speed and crispness of your Snow Leopard.
No, you can't have MobileMe services any more. iCloud will pretend to offer them, but it won't do so fully.
Yes, iCloud will eat away at your iPhone's battery with the constant synching - and No, it isn't like your iPhone has any to spare.
Best solution apparently is to run Windows7 on Parallels for your iCloud synching and keep Snow Leopard. But you MUST be very, very careful to install and "upgrade" to iCloud in the right order...
No. It isn't easy. And I am afraid, it will never be easy again.
 

Mal

macrumors 603
Jan 6, 2002
6,253
17
Orlando
Why do you even want a cloud service? What's the benefit of having ones files on some corporate apple/microsoft or google server? Is the monitoring of our regular internet traffic not enough? Use your brain instead of the cloud.
Why would you even want a computer? What's the benefit of having one's files on some electronic device? Is a file cabinet not good enough for you? Use your brain instead of a computer.

[/sarcasm]

Seriously, this attitude is absurd. The "cloud" provides significant benefits, and to suggest that someone shouldn't even want to use it because they're stupid if they do (which is exactly what you were suggesting with that last line) is arrogant and rude, not to mention short-sighted.

jW
 

chaosbunny

macrumors 68000
Why would you even want a computer? What's the benefit of having one's files on some electronic device? Is a file cabinet not good enough for you? Use your brain instead of a computer.

[/sarcasm]

Seriously, this attitude is absurd. The "cloud" provides significant benefits, and to suggest that someone shouldn't even want to use it because they're stupid if they do (which is exactly what you were suggesting with that last line) is arrogant and rude, not to mention short-sighted.

jW
So you don't understand the difference between files on ones own hd vs. files being monitored and profiled on some corporate apple/microsoft or google server? Of course it's understandable why cloud services are pushed as "the future". Your mails, google searches, facebook (which I don't use either) profiles are already saved and profiled. What's left are the files on your computer, and here comes the cloud. I guess you have heard of laws like ACTA monitoring all of our internet traffic? So yes, in my opinion it's stupid to use a cloud service. For me this is where I draw the line and say no thanks.

And if someone will claim now that "he has nothing to hide" - well, that's the most stupid answer against legitimate concerns about privacy in the internet age.

Edit: Look what I just found:

http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/2012/04/apple-holds-the-master-key-when-it-comes-to-icloud-security-privacy.ars

http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/2012/03/how-safe-is-icloud-data-ars-investigates.ars
 
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Martyimac

macrumors 68000
Aug 19, 2009
1,861
1,178
S. AZ.
Why would you even want a computer? What's the benefit of having one's files on some electronic device? Is a file cabinet not good enough for you? Use your brain instead of a computer.

[/sarcasm]

Seriously, this attitude is absurd. The "cloud" provides significant benefits, and to suggest that someone shouldn't even want to use it because they're stupid if they do (which is exactly what you were suggesting with that last line) is arrogant and rude, not to mention short-sighted.

jW
It's not absurd at all. And the reference to using your brain instead of a computer is in no way arrogant and rude. Unless of course you thought the statement was aimed at you personally, which I don't think it was. But enough personal comments, lets get back to discussing the cloud and encryption keys etal.

The debate between using the cloud and not using the cloud is really starting to heat up. There are those, like me, who fear the loss of privacy and the loss of data by using the "cloud". Read those two arstechnica articles. Do you really believe they are wrong?
I personally have lost data to the cloud, as well as having lost data that was not on the cloud. And I learned from that. I learned to backup my personal data at home so now if my computer dies, I still have MY data. In the cloud, not only did Apple lose my data but then synced that "data" back to my computer. That resulted in loss of data that was NOT backed up and required me to redo my contacts and calendar from scratch, not to mention the loss of e-mails which there was no way to restore. Of course I now backup that data that I can locally also.

Once the "cloud" can assure me there are easily retrieved backups to all the data I stored there, then I will consider using the "cloud" for what it is. Until then, I choose to use my brain and store all my data locally instead of trusting some unknown, and in my opinion, unreliable technology.
 

Mal

macrumors 603
Jan 6, 2002
6,253
17
Orlando
It's not absurd at all. And the reference to using your brain instead of a computer is in no way arrogant and rude. Unless of course you thought the statement was aimed at you personally, which I don't think it was. But enough personal comments, lets get back to discussing the cloud and encryption keys etal.

The debate between using the cloud and not using the cloud is really starting to heat up. There are those, like me, who fear the loss of privacy and the loss of data by using the "cloud". Read those two arstechnica articles. Do you really believe they are wrong?
I personally have lost data to the cloud, as well as having lost data that was not on the cloud. And I learned from that. I learned to backup my personal data at home so now if my computer dies, I still have MY data. In the cloud, not only did Apple lose my data but then synced that "data" back to my computer. That resulted in loss of data that was NOT backed up and required me to redo my contacts and calendar from scratch, not to mention the loss of e-mails which there was no way to restore. Of course I now backup that data that I can locally also.

Once the "cloud" can assure me there are easily retrieved backups to all the data I stored there, then I will consider using the "cloud" for what it is. Until then, I choose to use my brain and store all my data locally instead of trusting some unknown, and in my opinion, unreliable technology.
Your mistake, then, was not backing up, not using the cloud. You're blaming the wrong thing.

The cloud is not a replacement for backups, nor have I or anyone who truly understand it suggested that it should be. The cloud is designed to make your information accessible on many devices (at least iCloud, which is really what's being discussed here). This provides significant potential benefits, and carries little risk. Unless you fail to do proper backups, or are storing CIA-level sensitive data, you have nothing to fear from the cloud.

And the comment about using your brain was absolutely offensive, and I believe you meant it to be. The implication is that anyone who does use the cloud is therefore not using their brain. It's a weasely, cowardly way of calling others stupid without actually saying the words.

jW
 

Martyimac

macrumors 68000
Aug 19, 2009
1,861
1,178
S. AZ.
Your mistake, then, was not backing up, not using the cloud. You're blaming the wrong thing.

The cloud is not a replacement for backups, nor have I or anyone who truly understand it suggested that it should be. The cloud is designed to make your information accessible on many devices (at least iCloud, which is really what's being discussed here). This provides significant potential benefits, and carries little risk. Unless you fail to do proper backups, or are storing CIA-level sensitive data, you have nothing to fear from the cloud.

And the comment about using your brain was absolutely offensive, and I believe you meant it to be. The implication is that anyone who does use the cloud is therefore not using their brain. It's a weasely, cowardly way of calling others stupid without actually saying the words.

jW
In my world, calling somebody weasely and cowardly is much more offensive than telling someone to think (use their brain). I'll stick with just telling everyone to think and not call them weasely and cowardly.

And as to your backup comments, I think I was pretty clear in saying yes I had not done the backups I should have. But I also did not expect Apple to delete my info, which is, in fact, what happened. So I learned my lesson. Just wanted to post to put some more data out there.
 

Rigby

macrumors 601
Aug 5, 2008
4,791
3,733
San Jose, CA
Once the "cloud" can assure me there are easily retrieved backups to all the data I stored there, then I will consider using the "cloud" for what it is.
There are some services that offer such capabilities (e.g. Dropbox can retrieve older versions of your files).

Privacy concerns regarding the cloud are justified IMO. There is no way of knowing who has access to the data. Personally, I have no problems uploading my music or photos to the cloud. However, I do not feel comfortable giving up control over all my personal information (like contacts, calendars etc.). And I would never use the iCloud device backup function, since that also uploads stored passwords for non-Apple email accounts etc. to someone else's servers ...

The only secure cloud solutions are those where the data is encrypted on your own device before uploading. Unfortunately there are few services with that level of security (e.g. Spideroak).
 

stevep

macrumors 6502a
Oct 13, 2004
875
2
UK
Absolutely agree with Martyimac about the security concerns with a cloud service versus making your own secure file storage arrangements. There is no doubt that personal information is an asset to big data companies, and that many of these organisations have abused the trust of those who have disclosed their personal details to them. There is also no doubt that a cloud service is definitely not the place to store mission-critical data such as customer databases or sensitive financial data. In fact, in the UK, it would probably be a breach of the Data Protection legislation to store personal details of others using a cloud service because you would simply not be able to guarantee security.
Re Martyimac's comment about 'using your brain' - i took that to be an invite to think carefully about what you do with your data, and no more. If anyone read more into it than that they are being a bit too sensitive.
 

androiphone

macrumors 65816
Dec 13, 2009
1,000
1
And I would never use the iCloud device backup function, since that also uploads stored passwords for non-Apple email accounts etc. to someone else's servers ...
just an FYI but iCloud backups do not store the passwords of your email accounts it only stores the settings, if you restore your phone from an iCloud backup it will ask you for your email passwords because they were not backed up.
 

Mal

macrumors 603
Jan 6, 2002
6,253
17
Orlando
just an FYI but iCloud backups do not store the passwords of your email accounts it only stores the settings, if you restore your phone from an iCloud backup it will ask you for your email passwords because they were not backed up.
Correct. Those are stored in the Keychain, which is currently not backed up by iCloud. It was backed up by MobileMe, but for those who have switched, it's not any more. In addition, it's encrypted with the Keychain password, so even if it was stored on Apple's servers, they wouldn't necessarily have access to the information.

jW
 

Wild-Bill

macrumors 68030
Jan 10, 2007
2,540
607
bleep
Still,

The fact that WINDOWS users can benefit from iCloud while those of us who still use Snow Leopard are screwed. We have to kiss or MobileMe data goodbye come June. It's not right.
 

Rigby

macrumors 601
Aug 5, 2008
4,791
3,733
San Jose, CA
just an FYI but iCloud backups do not store the passwords of your email accounts it only stores the settings, if you restore your phone from an iCloud backup it will ask you for your email passwords because they were not backed up.
Thanks, that's good to know. So at least apps that use the Keychain to store sensitive information should be safe. I'm still hesitant to use device backup though, since I have a lot of other potentially sensitive stuff on my phone where I'm not sure if it's properly encrypted (like my cached work email and documents in Goodreader). It's just not transparent to me what gets backed up and what doesn't ...