Snow Leopard to Mavericks: Feeling Overwhelmed. What do I Need To Know?

Discussion in 'OS X Mavericks (10.9)' started by moog liberation, Oct 26, 2013.

  1. moog liberation macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2013
    #1
    So I just upgraded my 2010 Macbook Pro to Mavericks from Snow Leopard. I haven't kept up with the changes to OSX over the last 4 years, and I'm feeling a little overwhelmed at the moment. I also know there a ton of features that I must be missing. Has anyone created a guide for the changes from Snow Leopard to Mavericks? I can't be the only person in this boat.

    If not, does anyone to share anything that I need to know when it comes to things that have changed since Snow Leopard? Thanks.
     
  2. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #2
  3. moog liberation thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2013
    #3
    Thanks. I think I should rephrase my question a little bit:

    I never used Lion or Mountain Lion, so I know there must be some features that were introduced in those releases that are just "normal" parts of OSX now and wouldn't really be mentioned in a guide to Mavericks. Is there anything I should know about that was implemented into OSD before Mavericks that is still around and useful? Thanks again.
     
  4. benwiggy macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2012
    #4
    The biggest changes came in earlier OSes: Resume, Autosave and Versions.
    When you restart your Mac, it will reload all the apps that were open at shutdown. When you launch an app, it will reload all the documents that were open when you quit it.
    New applications don't need to save files: they do it automatically every 5 mins. The first time you save it is simply to give it a name and location on your drive.
    OS X then keeps a record of each version, a bit like time machine for each file.
    If you're used to altering a document and Saving As when you've finished, then you'll need to Duplicate the document first, then work on it.
    You can always Revert a document to the last opened version.

    Plenty of screaming has been posted about these: my advice is that it's best to get used to them, rather than try to make things work differently.
     
  5. chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #5
    This feature, at least, is a user-choosable option. To turn it off, go to:
    System Preferences > General

    Check the checkbox:
    Close windows when quitting an application


    You can also choose it by holding down Alt/Option and selecting Quit from an application's self-title menu. The option will always be the opposite of whatever you chose in the General pref-pane.

    I suggest experimenting with a program like TextEdit to discover exactly how both choices work.


    Finally, you can sometimes find a "Save as..." menu item by holding down the Alt/Opt key and looking in the File menu.
     
  6. ResPublica macrumors regular

    ResPublica

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2011
    #6
    The most radical changes (Resume, Mission Control, Autosave, Versions, new interface...) were made in Lion, so I would try to catch up with those innovations first. ML added a few extra's, like Messages, new apps and I believe iCloud was added around that time as well. Mavericks added few visible new features.
     
  7. Cougarcat macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2003
    #7
    If you really want to learn everything there is to know, read the last three Ars reviews. It'll take you a while but you'll learn a lot.
     
  8. DewGuy1999, Oct 26, 2013
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2013

    DewGuy1999 macrumors 68040

    DewGuy1999

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2009
    #8
    You could take a look at the video and text tutorials on this page:
    :apple: Apple - Find Out How - Mac Basics

    Thought of another option, these Macworld articles, read in order, should bring you up to speed:

    Mac OS X Lion: What you need to know

    Hands on with Apple's new OS X: Mountain Lion

    FAQ: Everything you need to know about OS X Mavericks
     

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