Snow Leopard Upgrade

Discussion in 'macOS' started by Twaize, Jun 18, 2009.

  1. Twaize macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2008
    #1
    Hi there,

    I'm planning on buying a Macbook Pro 13" sometime during early August, so my question is that.
    Is an update of OS X from 10.5 to 10.6 just as effective as a fresh install of 10.6? I have bad memories from upgrading from one version of windows to another, and was simply wondering whether there would be any "excess litter"?

    Thank you
     
  2. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #3
    Archive & Install is preferred to be honest.

    Lets not even bring up the Leopard upgrade problems from years ago. As I've said Archive & Install is the best option over a clean Erase & Install.
     
  3. MikhailT macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    #4
    Upgrading OSX isn't the same as upgrading Windows. I had no bad experience with upgrading either Mac OS X or any *nix flavors. They both are intelligent enough to do it without screwing up the rest of the system.

    But 10.6 should have the option of archiving old files and installing a fresh copy of SL or you can perform an erase and install option which'll format the drive and install SL.
     
  4. Twaize thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2008
    #5
    Footprint might not be reduced, and some of the many new features might be such an integral part of the OS, that it won't work properly? I know I'm probably just getting fuzzy over nothing, but I'd rather buy it in early August and play with it during the summer, than wait until September when uni has started again.

    Thank you for your help.

    @Eidorian
    Thank you as well, seems like a really cool feature.
     
  5. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #6
    Archive & Install is a very cool feature indeed. As always have a backup nonetheless. Time Machine makes it trivial.
     
  6. MikhailT macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    #7
    As long as you have time machine backups and keep all of your stuff organized in where it should be, the upgrade should go fine.
     
  7. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #8
    I think you might want to fix that.
     
  8. MikhailT macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    #9
    Fix what exactly? If I am incorrect, please feel free to correct me. My English may not be the best but I am not sure what I said was wrong.
     
  9. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #10
    Windows has separate user and system space as well.

    OS X doesn't prevent the user from modifying the system space either.
     
  10. t0mat0 macrumors 603

    t0mat0

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
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    Home
    #11
    Pre-OS upgrade is always an good time to look at making a decent backup of data, if any user hasn't done it before. Boring, but always worth mentioning :)
     
  11. MikhailT macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    #12
    Technically you're right. Both OS have separation land for both system and user but OS X specifically more than Windows "encourage" people to place their applications and personal files inside their home folder and applications. Almost all applications store their pref inside the user's library folder.

    Last I checked, C:\ is still visible to users and does not discourage users to put files in there. I still see people putting their crap inside C:\ instead of their "Documents" folder. Applications still use registry to store their stuff. This have changed lately with Vista and W7 and is improving but people are stubborn and are used to their XP's style.

    Think about the way the installers work on Windows, they almost always ask users where they want to install the apps, I know a lot of people who still install it in C:\. Now reinstall Windows with the clean registry, there's a lot of apps that won't work because the info is missing, .dlls is missing and so on. Something that pissed me off when I reinstalled Vista for a friend of mine and some of his app won't work because they are missing the registration information, some crap is not working at all.
     
  12. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #13
    The user's actions are the causes of the majority of the problems?

    / is visible to users and I've seen people place their files there. Lets not even delve into Desktops with hundreds of files regardless of the operating system.

    I've sadly had to encourage some users to install applications onto their desktops because they don't have administrator privileges. Not to mention that user space and accounts can roam.
     
  13. fulcrum.1995 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2009
    Location:
    San Jose, California
    #14
    I had a lot of problems reinstalling leopard after a kernal error. Many permissions were faulty and disk utility wouldn't repair them. I had to reinstall a lot of apps and I lost most of my preferences.

    +1 for archive and instal
     
  14. MikhailT macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    #15
    Oh yea, Desktop is just sad but we're going off the topic, I'll correct my original post.

    @OP as long as you have time machine backups and keep all of your stuff organized in where it should be, the upgrade should go fine.
     
  15. Eidorian macrumors Penryn

    Eidorian

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Location:
    Indianapolis
    #16
    Thank you for considering my points based on my experiences. Sadly regardless of the operating system if you have administrator privileges you can mess things up anywhere on your computer.

    I'm still surprised to find some users considering if they're going to use Time Machine or not.
     
  16. MikhailT macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    #17
    My experience as an IT Systems Engineer is 80% with Windows users, the rest of them, Mac users, I almost never had any issues with them and most of them didn't have the typical stupid stuff that Windows user pull off such as placing files outside where they should be and backups. I also encouraged all of the mac users to use Time Machine to backups or Mozy. It was much tougher to do the same for Windows users, there is no nice Windows Backup tool that is super user friendly like Time Machine. Luckily, Mozy was there to help me out.
     

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