So all LCD screens have backlight...

Kal-037

macrumors 68000
Original poster
So I know why we get some backlight bleed on all LCD LED TVs, idevices, and such, but i am curious: does backlight bleeding get worse?
I have a few minor light bleed spots on some edges of all my iDevices (a bit more on my iPad Pro due to its size) but does anyone know if it does actually get worse? Cause it's the first I'm hearing about it.
 
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Relentless Power

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Jul 12, 2016
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So I know why we get some backlight bleed on all LCD LED TVs, idevices, and such, but i am curious: does backlight bleeding get worse?
I have a few minor light bleed spots on some edges of all my iDevices (a bit more on my iPad Pro due to its size) but does anyone know if it does actually get worse? Cause it's the first I'm hearing about it.
Backlight bleed generally does not spread and is a defect from the panel assembly. Light escapes likely because there is a physical gap between the LCD panel and pressure from the front glass being glued, permitting light to pass through the glass panel from the rear light.

It's most noticeable when Brightness settings are at a higher level when the user can see the contrast with black is emitted. More specifically, it's located around edges or corners.
 
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Kal-037

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Man I know TVs and thought I knew Apple devices but every time I think I do... I'm way off. It doesn't help that my geek squad co-workers all say that backlight bleed gets worse over time. If that was true then wouldn't every single device be returned to the retailer? Ugh I swear working at bets buy has been nice for the discount, but I've become more paranoid about electronics than I ever thought possible. Lol
So essentially backlights only gets worse if I'm doing something stupid or. A strange error occurs?





Kallum.
 
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Relentless Power

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Jul 12, 2016
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If that was true then wouldn't every single device be returned to the retailer? So essentially backlights only gets worse if I'm doing something stupid or. A strange error occurs?.
The theory is that backlight bleed can spread when the LED panel heats up, which I can't prove or disprove based on that notion. From my understanding and experience with LED panels, I have not seen backlight bleed expand beyond its current state.

The reason you don't see every LED device, iPad or TV being returned because of back light bleed is not everyone has eyes that are tuned to observe what back light bleed is and how to recognize it. Backlight bleed is Common, but some cases are hardly noticeable and others are extreme. Again, it all depends on how the panels are assembled from the manufacture.

The reason you tend to notice it, is because you frequent tech forms and you have an idea of what it is, and you work in the store where items are returned every day for defects. But if you take the average individual, who purchases a TV, may not recognize the backlight bleed just based off not knowing what it is.

Also, it has nothing to do with something that you're doing to the device to cause backlight bleed. It's the LED panel and glass having a gap that is allowing light pass through. User settings on TV's can make backlight bleed more noticeable or less depending on what you have it set for.
 
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MrGimper

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Sep 22, 2012
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Andover, UK
The theory is that backlight bleed can spread when the LED panel heats up, which I can't prove or disprove based on that notion. From my understanding and experience with LED panels, I have not seen backlight bleed expand beyond its current state.

The reason you don't see every LED device, iPad or TV being returned because of back light bleed is not everyone has eyes that are tuned to observe what back light bleed is and how to recognize it. Backlight bleed is Common, but some cases are hardly noticeable and others are extreme. Again, it all depends on how the panels are assembled from the manufacture.

The reason you tend to notice it, is because you frequent tech forms and you have an idea of what it is, and you work in the store where items are returned every day for defects. But if you take the average individual, who purchases a TV, may not recognize the backlight bleed just based off not knowing what it is.

Also, it has nothing to do with something that you're doing to the device to cause backlight bleed. It's the LED panel and glass having a gap that is allowing light pass through. User settings on TV's can make backlight bleed more noticeable or less depending on what you have it set for.
...because you come to these forums and are told to put a black screen on your iPad, crank the brightness up to full, and go in a completely dark room. If you happen to notice a hint of bleed, you should return it, despite this being a totally artificial test of real-world usage.

Bit like the "leave this checkerboard pattern on your screen for 10 minutes and if there's image retention then you must return it immediately"
 

Relentless Power

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Jul 12, 2016
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...because you come to these forums and are told to put a black screen on your iPad, crank the brightness up to full, and go in a completely dark room. If you happen to notice a hint of bleed, you should return it, despite this being a totally artificial test of real-world usage.

Bit like the "leave this checkerboard pattern on your screen for 10 minutes and if there's image retention then you must return it immediately"
Exactly. What you don't want to do, is naturally look for defects, I would just try to enjoy the device for what it is. Now, if a defect happens to stand out and is Widely apparent when you're using the device, then I would suggest making a return and that's understandable. But if somebody used every test suggested by someone on a tech forum when they receive a device, it just creates a sense of paranoia.
 
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MrGimper

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Sep 22, 2012
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Exactly. What you don't want to do, is naturally look for defects, I would just try to enjoy the device for what it is. Now, if a defect happens to stand out and is Widely apparent when you're using the device, then I would suggest making a return and that's understandable. But if somebody used every test suggested by someone on a tech forum when they receive a device, it just creates a sense of paranoia.
Yep... I've seen cases of extreme light bleeding normal use, in the black top and bottom bars when watching a video. This is an obvious reason to exchange. But some go too far with tests
 
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