So Much for the Apple Store

shane-o-mac

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jan 24, 2005
130
0
I guess I am just venting my frustrations......but I really was dissapointed with the level of service and knowledge of the employees at the apple store.

In reading this forum for only a matter a week or so I seemed to be more in the know then the two apple store empoyees that "helped" me out. They did not know what rpms the drives on the ibook, macs, and powerbooks spun at. Had no clue about the compatibility issues between DVI and VGA inputs on the ibook and powerbooks (One employee even told me you could plug a 20 inch cinema display into the ibook with out any need for an adapter). Guess the gist is they had only the basic commerical knowledge necessary to wow uninformed consumers. Thank God for a cool sight like this so you can do your research. In my opinion the apple store is great for checking out all the cool products, but do not rely on the sells people to be up to par. Most non spec systems have to be ordered on line anyway. The cool thing is I got to check out the new imacs and they rock.
Even decided to stretch my cash and opt out of an ibook for a new 17 inch i mac. The displays are amazing!! The 20" is just too hughe for my works space. Happy hunting!
 

amoildani

macrumors member
Apr 20, 2004
48
0
that pretty much goes for most electronic/computer stores. they dont know anything, but try to use their small knowledge to amaze those that dont know anything.
best buy is big on that, especially since the guy there didnt know there was a difference in a mac and a dell...
 

JeffTL

macrumors 6502a
Dec 18, 2003
733
0
You'd expect a specialty store -- a manufacturer outlet, no less -- to train the sales staff about the products. If someone is told that he can connect his 20" cinema to an iBook without an adapter and buys the components expecting to be able to do so, he's likely to bring back the display and order online next time. On the other hand, a salesperson who knows about the products might sell this customer a PowerBook.
 

Applespider

macrumors G4
I wonder what day of the week it was and whether it was a 'Saturday only' employee perhaps. And how new they are

The few times I've gone into an Apple Store to ask a question and the first person hasn't known the answer, they've told me that they're not sure and gone off to hunt down someone who does.
 

shane-o-mac

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jan 24, 2005
130
0
I went to the Apple Store in Columbus, Ohio. I did go on a saturday and it was very busy. However, besides the lack of knowledge they just did not seem very excited about their products. It is just a slight downer, since I am so excited to switch from a pc to a mac. Apple products still rock in my opinion.
 

wdlove

macrumors P6
Oct 20, 2002
16,568
0
A year ago I bought a 20" Cinema Display for my Power Mac G4. I told them that it was dual 450, purchased in September of 2000. Was all excited about the purchase. When I got home hooked up the display and then booted the machine, I got a gray screen that turned to black. When I returned it, another staff member said that the person should have known. Needless to say I was very disappointed.

My impression was that in order to apply at an Apple Store it required a certain level of knowledge. That is why I thought I would never have a chance. Such as knowing the things that shane-o-mac mentioned.

I have noticed though when a question is as, if the staff member is unsure they seek out a staff member that is more knowledgeable. They seem to be enthusiastic for the most part, either that or I seek those individual out.
 

raddsigns

macrumors member
Nov 19, 2004
63
0
Minnesota
It does suck when they blow smoke - I've always recieved the best service and attention at all the stores in the Minneapolis area, however I have a friend that lives about an hour south of Denver that was a switcher, and thus a first time Mac buyer, drove for an hour one night to get to the Apple store to recieve next to zero service, and no one wanted to answer his basic questions about the $2500 Powebook he was buying.

He was pretty disppointed and bummed, luckily he went with his gut feeling and bought the Powerbook anyhow and is a Mac user for life now. He has since bought an iMac and absolutely loves both his machines.

It just amazes me that these positions in the apple stores are supposed to be very difficult to get - and people would act like asses. I know everyone has bad days, but it just doesn't seem right - espeicially when they don't even have basic product knowledge.

Like I said I've sat and just chatted with the guys at the genuius bar before and they have solved any problems I've had just by talking to me and I went home and tried their suggestions.
 

dejo

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 2, 2004
15,981
450
The Centennial State
raddsigns said:
...I have a friend that lives about an hour south of Denver that was a switcher, and thus a first time Mac buyer, drove for an hour one night to get to the Apple store to recieve next to zero service, and no one wanted to answer his basic questions about the $2500 Powebook he was buying.
Denver has two Apple Stores: Aspen Grove in Littleton and Cherry Creek in Denver proper. Do you know which one? I have been to the Aspen Grove store on a number of occasions and found the staff there quite knowledgeable (or willing to find who was). And the techs at the Genius Bar are, IMHO, truly geniuses. They seem very well trained in quickly diagnosing problems.
 

raddsigns

macrumors member
Nov 19, 2004
63
0
Minnesota
I do know that it was the Cherry Creek store. I don't know if he's aware that there is another store in Denver - I'll make sure he knows though!!
 

dotdotdot

macrumors 68020
Jan 23, 2005
2,381
33
At my store I asked about KVM switches once and the guy said that they dont work with Macs :p
 

Daveway

macrumors 68040
Jul 10, 2004
3,372
0
New Orleans / Lafayette, La
I've been to only 2 Apple stores and that was when I was on vacation, as we don't have any here in New Orleans :mad:. I found that when I went into one of the stores that I was not approached by a sales person at all. They just hung out in the back off the store talking amongst themselves. I found this to be disturbing, they should be all over people that just wonder into the store.

Also, most electronics stores hire employees in high school that are just looking to pay for their car insurance and don't have much technological experience. I thought Apple would have higher standards then most others but obviously not.
 

dejo

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 2, 2004
15,981
450
The Centennial State
daveway00 said:
I found that when I went into one of the stores that I was not approached by a sales person at all. They just hung out in the back off the store talking amongst themselves. I found this to be disturbing, they should be all over people that just wonder into the store.
I love that. Much prefered to the vultures at other stores that don't even wait until you knock the snow of your boots before getting in your face.
 

inkswamp

macrumors 68030
Jan 26, 2003
2,732
697
shane-o-mac said:
I guess I am just venting my frustrations......but I really was dissapointed with the level of service and knowledge of the employees at the apple store.
Hold on, now. These aren't high paying jobs that require a sophisticated level of technical knowledge. They're salespeople and as such, they need to serve the average customer and they need to be personable and attentive. You sound like you're quite a bit above the average customer. Most people don't ask about RPMs, much less know what that refers to in a computer... and VGA... most shoppers would say WTF to that. To expect these people to posses encyclopedic knowledge of technical issues is silly.

What you should be able to expect is that they treat you and your question respectfully and that they have some means and know-how for finding the answers you want. If you get that much (even if the answer isn't quick in coming) then they have done all that is expected of them.

I'm not trying to berate you but your expectations are a little unrealistic.
 

inkswamp

macrumors 68030
Jan 26, 2003
2,732
697
daveway00 said:
They just hung out in the back off the store talking amongst themselves. I found this to be disturbing, they should be all over people that just wonder into the store.
Did you need help? A lot of salespeople learn to read your body language and the way you're browsing to sense if you want to be bothered or not.

I hate when salespeople swoop in on me immediately when I enter any kind of store. It's annoying and a little rude. A salesperson should take cues and approach you only if you are showing some interesting in something specific. If you're just there browsing around and checking things out, I think a good salesperson will leave you be, or at most, make small talk to get a sense of what you're doing (although, most of the time I find that annoying too.)

Anyway, I have no problem with salespeople letting me be until I need some help.
 

Applespider

macrumors G4
I like a salesperson making eye contact and smiling when I go into the store. That way I feel that if I need help, I can ask and he'll offer. If I just want to browse, I can just smile back and keep going.

I had a bad experience at the Apple Store in N Michigan Ave, Chicago. My body language was screaming help - and it took me over 10 minutes to find someone who could help - although they couldn't so they sent me to someone else who I waited for for 5 minutes, he couldn't help and suggested waiting for someone else - I left! The $40 I would have saved buying there, wasn't worth wasting an hour of my trip.
 

Chip NoVaMac

macrumors G3
Dec 25, 2003
8,894
31
Northern Virginia
inkswamp said:
Did you need help? A lot of salespeople learn to read your body language and the way you're browsing to sense if you want to be bothered or not.

I hate when salespeople swoop in on me immediately when I enter any kind of store. It's annoying and a little rude. A salesperson should take cues and approach you only if you are showing some interesting in something specific. If you're just there browsing around and checking things out, I think a good salesperson will leave you be, or at most, make small talk to get a sense of what you're doing (although, most of the time I find that annoying too.)

Anyway, I have no problem with salespeople letting me be until I need some help.
One of the first lessons in retail is to acknowledge the customers presence at least. One it might lead to a sale, but it is also a theft deterrent practice. Haven't had any of the issues described at the two Apple store in the NOVA area.
 
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