So why Did Steve die?

Discussion in 'Apple, Inc and Tech Industry' started by nutritious, Oct 6, 2011.

  1. nutritious macrumors 6502

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    #1
    I know everyone online keeps saying pancreatic cancer and whatnot. But he had a "curable" form of pancreatic cancer, and it was surgically removed. He also had a liver transplant back in 2009, and I don't think a liver transplant can be done on someone with cancer. I really don't know, though. I'm not a doctor. Any ideas?
     
  2. simsaladimbamba

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    #2
    The cancer obviously came back, thus the medical leave early 2011 and the resignation in August.
    Or maybe the liver failed, maybe we will know later, when more details emerge, but it is not our business to know anyway.
     
  3. XX55XX, Oct 6, 2011
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2011

    XX55XX macrumors regular

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    Though the BBC claims that he died of pancreatic cancer, we won't know until the biography hits. I believe his cancer went into remission, and metastasized in his liver, forcing a liver transplant, but the process of metastasis continued until it killed him.

    Jobs rejected invasive treatment initially, but he had the tumor removed. Of course, surgery leaves some cancerous around, and Jobs did not have chemotherapy to kill the remaining cells, so perhaps they remained around, growing, growing, growing...

    I am not a doctor, but I believe that metastasis of cancer cells throughout his body killed him. That, or liver failure because of organ rejection.
     
  4. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

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    #4
    Sorry to be rude, but this kind of uninformed and idle speculation is senseless, perhaps even idiotic.

    Any physician on this forum knows that speculation about an individual whom one has never examined, or whose complete clinical record has not been read, approaches, or reaches, unethical behavior.

    If the family chooses to release information on cause of death, then we will know. If they do not, speculation is, to say the least, foolish.

    And, at the end of the day - it's really no one's business but the family.
     
  5. tmagman macrumors 6502

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    #5
    with the final interview for the authorized biography happening only 4 weeks ago, we may see some final insight into his health.
     
  6. eawmp1 macrumors 601

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    #6
    1) He was mortal
    2) Even with therapy for his reported type of cancer, it is often fatal with a low 5 year survival rate.
    3) That he survived longer was remarkable.
     
  7. nutritious, Oct 6, 2011
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2011

    nutritious thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #7
    He had a rare form of pancreatic cancer that was surgically removed...



    Looking at your sig and your logic, you seem like one of those naive pseudo-intellectuals.

    It's not uninformed. Steve said himself in his 2005 speech to Stanford that his form of cancer was surgically removed. There's absolutely nothing unethical about wondering why someone died, especially someone as famous as him.

    Oh, by the way, speculation in this case is NOT foolish because it has no tangible consequence on any of us. It's no different than gossiping about your favorite celebrity.
     
  8. eawmp1 macrumors 601

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    He had a Whipple procedure in 2004. The liver transplant in 2009 was likely due to metastatic spread of his tumor to that organ. However, either he had spread to the lymphatic system (most likely), or progressive failure of his transplanted liver (less likely).

    The cause, however, does not change the outcome.
     
  9. *LTD*, Oct 6, 2011
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2011

    *LTD* macrumors G4

    *LTD*

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    #9
    He died of cancer. It can return, anywhere in the body.

    That's one of the difficult things about cancer. It can be remarkably persistent and unpredictable.

    This is the great killer of our generation. Not heart disease (which can be controlled), not AIDS (with good genetics and the right medical cocktail one can live well into old age and beat it), but cancer, in virtually all its forms. It is insidious, and often thrives on the physical weakness caused by the very drugs and procedures designed to fight it.

    A true, broad-spectrum cure for cancer will be the greatest discovery in generations. The person(s) responsible for it will be candidates for sainthood, never mind coveted prizes.
     
  10. Hellhammer Moderator

    Hellhammer

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    #10
    Or the transplant might have caused some kind of a complication. Or these other sicknesses worsened his immune system to a level that even a regular fever could have killed him. The list just goes on. Without an official statement, we are just guessing. The cancer must have had an impact on Steve's body, but that doesn't mean it was the final COD.
     
  11. Kblakeshot, Oct 7, 2011
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2011

    Kblakeshot macrumors member

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    #11
  12. simsaladimbamba

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    #12
    What report?
    Those reports created in a forum?
     
  13. Daffodil macrumors 6502

    Daffodil

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    #13
    ^This. Reminds me of this xkcd (point still stands, even though that's breast cancer...)

    Not sure I agree too much with the rest, though... Cancer isn't one monolithic thing, so expecting a single miraculous cure is a pipe dream. Although I suppose you're right in the sense that if someone (very improbably) were to discover such a thing, they'd definitely get the Nobel prize for it...

    And while heart disease can be "controlled" (e.g. things like exercise can do a world of preventative good), it's still a huge killer in first world countries. Don't know the numbers elsewhere, but in Norway 2 of 5 people die from heart disease, think the number in the UK is something like 1 of 3...
     
  14. Don't panic macrumors 603

    Don't panic

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    #14
    if you are interested in cancer, cancer therapy, I highly recommend "the emperor of all maladies".
    It's not about steve jobs and it's not about pancreatic cancer specifically, but it's a remarkable book about the history of cancer and of the attempts to cure it.
    It's a big book, but it's well written and very accessible to the lay person while remaining technically very accurate and balanced.
    one of the best books i read this year.

    it covers very well, for example how many cancers relapse even when the initial therapy appeared to be successful, be it surgery, radio or chemotherapy.
     

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