Solar Eclipse 2016

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by obeygiant, Mar 9, 2016.

  1. obeygiant macrumors 68040

    obeygiant

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2002
    Location:
    totally cool
    #1
    [​IMG]

    Lucky passengers on tomorrow's Alaska Airlines Flight 870 will get a special sight when they look out the window: a total solar eclipse. The flight from Anchorage to Honolulu purposefully adjusted its departure time so that the plane's passengers could see the eclipse's totality — the period when the entire solar disc is covered and only the outer edges are visible.

    The plot to change the flight's course happened over a year ago, according to Alaska Airlines. Joe Rao, an associate astronomer at theHayden Planetarium in New York City, figured out that Flight 870 would be in the perfect spot to see the total eclipse. But the flight's scheduled departure time would mean the plane would miss totality by 25 minutes. Rao then called Alaska Airlines, convincing the company to delay the flight to 2PM local time.

    Now, Rao and other eclipse lovers are slated to fill Flight 870's seats tomorrow, so they can get a great view of the event from 37,000 feet. The plane's passengers will be able to see totality at 5:35PM local time, nearly 700 miles north of Honolulu. And those who just want to get to Hawaii will only arrive about half an hour later than expected.

    Solar eclipses occur when the Moon passes between the Sun and the Earth, casting a shadow on the planet's surface. This phenomenon makes it seem like the Sun goes black for a brief period of time. Total solar eclipses occur about once a year, but they often appear over water or unpopulated areas, making them rare events to witness personally. NASA maps show that only a few populated islands in Southeast Asia will be able to see tomorrow's total eclipse — but now 163 people aboard Flight 870 will get a glimpse, too.





    Starts around 2:21


    Has anyone ever seen a total eclipse before?

    There one in the US in August 2017. I'm planning on finding a spot to view it some where in Memphis.
     
  2. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2011
    Location:
    República Cascadia
    #2
    Never a total, but experiences several partials that were 80-90% totality.
     
  3. obeygiant thread starter macrumors 68040

    obeygiant

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2002
    Location:
    totally cool
    #3
    The only solar eclipse I've see was a partial July 31, 2000 when I was in Santa Monica. Eerie light outside.

    It would be fun to be an Eclipse Chaser.
     
  4. tillsbury macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2007
    #4
    Had seen a few partials, but never a total, and was told they were very different. But so few of them seem to be in a place you'd actually want to go in the first place, and even fewer are somewhere there's a good chance of a clear sky. Finally got the chance in 2012 to take my son to see a good long one in Port Douglas, Queensland, at dawn on the beach. Amazing experience. To anyone thinking about it, make sure that once in your life you make the effort to see a total.
     
  5. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #6
    Exactly. Not many occur where they can be seen easily seen, - or in places to where and from whence travel can be easily arranged.

    Moreover, parts of the world, such as, say, in north west Europe, cloud cover could also be an issue which would impede viewing.

    Personally, I have seen a few partials, and would love to get the opportunity to see a total eclipse.
     
  6. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2011
    Location:
    República Cascadia
    #7
    Since totality is passing through the sunny parts of Oregon, I'm going to start making a plan to be there.
     
  7. obeygiant thread starter macrumors 68040

    obeygiant

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2002
    Location:
    totally cool
    #8
    I'm trying to figure out which part or the country has the least chance for clouds during the eclipse. Its mid August so it should be clear.
     

Share This Page