Sprint/Nextel hybrid setup, any users?

someguy

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Dec 4, 2005
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So I just got "sold" into trying the IC502 Motorola phone with Sprint/Nextel.

The deal was actually pretty sweet because I don't have an activation fee, the phone is 100% free, and I have 30 days to back out of the whole thing, including the new 2-year agreement. I even get to keep the plan that I've had for years (which is no longer available as of almost a year ago).

My only concern is that I hear a lot of people saying it just plain sucks. They say the service is not any better (even though I'll be using both Sprint and Nextel towers) and it's been nothing but problems.

My thinking is that the service with my phone is terrible, my phone itself is terrible and I get a new one for free, and I can't seem to find any other wireless companies that people don't complain about for one reason or another so why not stick with Nextel if I can make it work. Plus I love the DC and free incoming!

But back on topic, is anyone using this "hybrid" phone, or a similar one on Sprint/Nextel towers? How is the service? Where are you located? Etc.

Thanks for any input! If anyone is interested, I will report back with my user experience next week after I've had a chance to test it out. :)
 

MacNut

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From what I understand it uses Sprint's voice and Nextel's walkie talkie.
 

someguy

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From what I understand it uses Sprint's voice and Nextel's walkie talkie.
I was told that it uses both carriers towers and then Nextel's walkie talkie. I'm not sure though.

Well, my parents own Nextel phones for thier business and Sprint phones for their personal use if thats what yoiu mean...
Not quite. :)

Apparently, Motorola makes a phone (at least one, anyways) that has the ability to switch between both Sprint and Nextel's individual wireless networks which seems like it would have it's advantages. I don't really know too much about it, though, which is why I posted here hoping someone else would.
 

MacNut

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Your answer is right in the article.
The first CDMA / iDEN hybrid phone, using CDMA for voice and data, and iDEN for walkie-talkie functions. Features of this basic clamshell phone include ruggedized housing, speakerphone, Java, and location-based services.
 

yg17

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Aug 1, 2004
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Its not really a hybrid phone. As stated before, it uses Sprint (CDMA) for voice, and Nextel (iDEN) for walkie talkie. And CDMA and iDEN are in no way, shape or form compatible with each other. So if you don't have service on Sprint, or Sprint service sucks, it won't just switch over to Nextel, you're completely SOL. Perhaps hybrid isn't the best way to put it, as it won't actually switch between the 2.
 

MacNut

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The basic idea is that it is a Sprint phone with Nextel running in the back round for the walkie talkie. It is not a duel band phone in the sense that it jumps voice calls. The iDEN is just for the walkie talkie and not voice.

I think you need 2 contracts too.
 

bousozoku

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Jun 25, 2002
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Its not really a hybrid phone. As stated before, it uses Sprint (CDMA) for voice, and Nextel (iDEN) for walkie talkie. And CDMA and iDEN are in no way, shape or form compatible with each other. So if you don't have service on Sprint, or Sprint service sucks, it won't just switch over to Nextel, you're completely SOL. Perhaps hybrid isn't the best way to put it, as it won't actually switch between the 2.
Then again, it you can't make a voice call on Sprint, you can switch to walkie-talkie and use the Nextel service.

I rarely every have trouble with Sprint and I had one of their Sanyo ReadyLink walkie-talkie phones but did anyone use them for that?
 

MacNut

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Ready Link is not as good as the Walkie Talkie in that what Nextel had was a true 2 way radio while Ready link needed the network.
 

someguy

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Your answer is right in the article.
The answer to a secondary question, but thanks. That definitely clears a few things up.

I was hoping for someone who can tell me from personal use what this is like, but it kind of seems like it might be more of a local thing for whatever reason.

And I only need one contract, FYI. (thank God).
 

yg17

macrumors G5
Aug 1, 2004
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St. Louis, MO
Then again, it you can't make a voice call on Sprint, you can switch to walkie-talkie and use the Nextel service.


Which helps you out oh so much when the other person doesn't have Nextel ;)


We need fewer phones with the walkie talkie thing, every time I hear a chirp and then the ensuing conversation in public, I want to grab their phone and shove it up their, uh, I think you get the idea :D
 

bousozoku

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Jun 25, 2002
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Ready Link is not as good as the Walkie Talkie in that what Nextel had was a true 2 way radio while Ready link needed the network.
Yes, Ready Link needed the network and it was on the Sprint...

Which helps you out oh so much when the other person doesn't have Nextel ;)


We need fewer phones with the walkie talkie thing, every time I hear a chirp and then the ensuing conversation in public, I want to grab their phone and shove it up their, uh, I think you get the idea :D
I know I know. Those people often speak very loudly because they're in a noisy place and it's very annoying.
 

zflauaus

macrumors 65816
Nov 19, 2004
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Ok, the Nextel name is basically dead. It's not Sprint/Nextel anymore, it's not Sprint, together with Nextel, it's just Sprint basically.

Sprint is a CDMA network and Nextel is an iDEN Network. Basically think of it this way: Sprint = Voice and Data, Nextel = Walkie-Talkie first with a voice network slapped on it.

Basically the Hybrid will, before you make a call, determine if you have a CDMA signal to make a call on, if not it'll go over the the iDEN network. The phone will ALWAYS use the iDEN network for "chirping" since using it over 1x or EVDO (both Rev. 0 and A) suck horribly. EVDO Rev. B or WiMAX will be the "chirps" replacement network, but they have until 2010 to develop it out.

The contract is just under the Sprint name since the companies are together now. Nextel will/is phased out and is now the Sprint DirectConnect network or whatever you'd like to say.

Questions?
 

someguy

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Dec 4, 2005
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Questions?
Yes. Are you or anyone you know using this phone (or another similar "hybrid") on this network and if so, what is your/their experience with it?

I appreciate the information on how it works, but I'm more concerned with IF it works becuase I've heard a few bad things about it.
 

wongulous

macrumors 6502a
Dec 7, 2002
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I personally just cannot stand Nextel, their DirectConnect technology, or the users of their services. People are so lame about using it, intentionally turning up the volume or using it conspicuously in public for attention... especially in places where they COULD be holding it up to their face quite easily, but they choose to use it at arm's length like a speakerphone. OH MY GOD NO SOONER THAN I TYPED THIS SOMEONE WALKED INTO MY OFFICE AND I HEARD THAT STUPID BEEP BEEP AND MUMBLING. I see him now and there is NO REASON he couldn't open the phone up and use it that way. :rolleyes: :mad:

But I do love me some Sprint SERO.
 

MacNut

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Jan 4, 2002
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Ok I got a question, Nextel never charged for walkie talkie, Sprint charged a fee for Ready Link Is the Nextel walkie talkie still free through Sprint.