SSD Drive for Mac Pro 4,1/5,1

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by ilegal31, Jul 4, 2015.

  1. ilegal31 macrumors member

    ilegal31

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2014
    #1
    Hello,


    I am planning to upgrade my ma pro drives to SSD, any recommendations for a supported SSD?.


    Thanks.
     
  2. Arron Rouse macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2010
    Location:
    Chichester, UK
    #2
    FWIW, I've used lots of different SSDs over the years and had a good experience with all of them. I just read the reviews and pick the ones that fit my budget at the time. Currently that means a couple of Samsung 840 Evo drives, one for OSX and one for Boot Camp Windows.

    I use 2.5 to 3.5 caddies for the drives so that they happily use the normal drive bays. That means they're using SATA II which limits them to 300MB/s. However, to me at least, the big benefit of SSD is not the transfer rate but the fact that random access is instantaneous.

    Some people are keen on SATA III cards so that they can get 600MB/s. Personally, I'd rather have extra SSD drive space than spend £100 on one. I can happily put up with a gig of data taking 4 seconds to move instead of 2.

    Also, if you need ultimate performance, a lot of people are making a big fuss about the Samsung SM951. You need an adapter that uses a PCIE slot for it and the combination is expensive. But it's very, very, very fast. To me at least, it looks a much better deal than a SATA III card.
     
  3. Synchro3 macrumors 65816

    Synchro3

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2014
    #3
  4. IowaLynn macrumors 6502a

    IowaLynn

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2015
    #4
    knowing which Mac Pro and just what it is setup to do would help.

    Any of the blade-type PCIe-SSD will make excellent fast devices, do not require a controller but use an adapter only (no firmeware or driver req'd) and capable of 1000-1500MB/sec - something that even two SSDs in RAID0 cannot lay claim to.

    I would also say it is better to not have more than one using SATA II drive bays. A Samsung EVO 850 1TB might get you started, move to Apricorn SATA III in one of the open PCIe slots.
     
  5. TonyK macrumors 6502a

    TonyK

    Joined:
    May 24, 2009
    #5
    I have Crucial SSD units in both a 3,1 and a 4,1 (my wife's) and have had no problems.
     
  6. SoyCapitanSoyCapitan macrumors 68040

    SoyCapitanSoyCapitan

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2015
    #6
    I had the blade types and in RAID. There was no noticable improvement over SATA 3 unless someone editing 4K videos, or many layers of HD videos, or high traffic server. I sold all the blades and now prefer larger capacity cheaper Evo 850 drives mounted on Sonnet Tempo Pro.
     
  7. kohlson macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    #7
    I have had an older OCZ is my 4,1 for a couple of years. I took advantage of an unused connector in the optical bay (I have only one optical drive). I found the 2.5-inch to 5.25-inch adapters to not work very well (and relatively expensive), so it's just fastened to the bottom of the installed drive using duct tape.
     
  8. SoyCapitanSoyCapitan macrumors 68040

    SoyCapitanSoyCapitan

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2015
    #8
    OWC sled adapters are really good and cheap.
     
  9. bidouilleur macrumors newbie

    bidouilleur

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2008
    Location:
    France
    #9
    jut installed first ssd in my old 1.1 (converted to 2.1), OWC 3G SSD with sled adapter, no use in buying a 6G as it can't go faster then 3g anyway
    pleased for now, on 10.10.4 and trim native activated, compared to my old hdd ... fast indeed..
     
  10. ilegal31 thread starter macrumors member

    ilegal31

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2014
    #10
    Hello,


    The Mac pro is 4,1 model firmware upgraded to 5,1, I want to avoid using trim, so I am looking for an SSD that offers speed to my machine, thanks in advance for the help.
     
  11. crjackson2134 macrumors 68020

    crjackson2134

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2013
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    #11
    I purchased a sled exactly like the factory sled, except that it's designed for 2.5" drives rather than 3.5" drives. It was cheap, works perfectly and looks like a factory part. It was about $15 so it wasn't DIRT cheap, but well worth it for a factory like part.
     
  12. crjackson2134, Jul 7, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2015

    crjackson2134 macrumors 68020

    crjackson2134

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2013
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC
    #12
    I like Samsung SSDs.

    I have to ask why you want to avoid trim. It's like saying "I want to avoid more RAM", or "Please give me ISA slots, I want to avoid PCIe".

    If you already owned an ancient SSD that has known faulty firmware and doesn't function correctly with trim activated (an older OWC SSD comes to mind) I would understand, but since you are SSD shopping for a new drive your motives elude me.

    :confused: (scratches head)
     
  13. ilegal31 thread starter macrumors member

    ilegal31

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2014
    #13
    Hello,


    The reason to avoid trim is because the heavy job that I do in video, design and post leaves residues "Data" in the HD, and I had Ben using ONYX for several years to maintain my HD healthy and it does a pretty good job, ONYX does interfere if you are not careful so I don't want to bother with having to reinstall the OS y something goes wrong.
     
  14. IowaLynn macrumors 6502a

    IowaLynn

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2015
    #14
    I would avoid installing anything on a performance production system - really, even those monitoring apps and found having two cooks checking the drive status was... too many.

    So I can see not wanting something like TRIM if it affects work (I would think audio would be one field where SSD is a huge improvement as are scratch and cache and system) but where there "might" be some affect from SSD TRIM. So what I would do is boot from another drive on a regular basis and have TRIM and run DU on your production SSD(s) though - you need TRIM. And it helps in your case to allow extra free unused SSD page blocks and over-provisioning. You can't turn off Background Garbage Collection. And it is not as efficient. TRIM tells the SSD via the OS what cells to mark as no longer used which is a big help.

    How about try with and without? again if you had trouble in the past. Also SSDs have more of their own built in cache memory, better controllers (2011 era was terrible with the move to SATA III). And now with PCIe-SSD NGFFs. Huge IO queue depth, near-zero latency seeks, 1400MB/sec to handle whatever you throw at it. And almost double what RAID0 SATA III was offering for previous years, with problems / overhead of RAID0 setups.
     
  15. SoyCapitanSoyCapitan macrumors 68040

    SoyCapitanSoyCapitan

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2015
    #15
    Samsung just release the 2TB version of the 850 :)))
     
  16. bladerunner2000 macrumors 68000

    bladerunner2000

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2015
    #16
    Only two you should be looking at are eithe Samsungs or Intels. Both have the lowest failure rates. If you do end up buying an SSD, make sure to install TRIM Enabler: https://www.cindori.org/software/trimenabler/

    If you're going to be running on El Capitan, you won't need Trim Enabler, Apple has finally pulled it's head out of it's ass and made way for trim support for 3rd party drives after about 6 years of waiting. Better late than never, I suppose.
     
  17. Shamgar macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2015
    #17
    Trimforce was added in 10.10.4. Don't even have to wait until El Capitan.
     
  18. Sweeper29, Nov 16, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2016

    Sweeper29 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2009
    #18
    Agree!!! I'm using the OWC accelsior product (yes I know that a few here do not like OWC) for over 2.5 years before it crapped out on me - they replaced it under warranty and now I'm back in the saddle. Use the PCI-e version SSD blade drive as the Boot drive - you'll get quick startup and OS reaction time making one almost forget how slow the original processors are in the older 2009 Mac Pro. If you set it up this way then the 4 HD bays can instead be filled with run of the mill 2TB HDD for data storage only - don't need speed in the bays anymore as the PCI-SSD is doing all the heavy lifting for of your applications (if there is adequate space to do so). Suggest buying as large a drive as one can afford in order to have the scratch disk space on it as well. And if you ditch the Mac Pro later - the PCI-e blade SSD can be kept and housed in a separate PCI-e box as an external Hard Drive.
     

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