Ssd in late 2007 Macbook Pro?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by RestUnknown, Feb 28, 2015.

  1. RestUnknown macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2011
    #1
    Hi all

    I have a Macbook Pro which turned 7 years in January. I'm planning on using this laptop till it's completely broken. But lately it has been quite slow with certain tasks (especially boot and starting an office app for the first time). I don't know if it's because of Yosemite asking a lot off the cpu and if it would help to revert back to a previous OS or that a ssd would cure my problems.

    The current specs are 2.2ghz Core 2 Duo and 4gb of ram (the swap is never used).

    I know the ssd won't use its full power because of the bandwith limit the interface would be able to handle, but am wondering if it would still be useful and I would be 'settled' for as long the laptop works or that the cpu is just getting too slow.

    I use the laptop for normal day to day tasks as reading pdf's, surfing and music. I do not play any games.

    Thanks
     
  2. catean macrumors regular

    catean

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    Jun 16, 2013
    Location:
    Timisoara, Romania
    #2
    Installing a SSD will make it fly for another 2-3 years.
     
  3. Woochoo macrumors 6502

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    Oct 12, 2014
    #3
    If you put an SSD on it comming from a 5400rpm HDD, you'll really notice it. I don't know if your model has Sata 2 but mine has and it goes up to 250-260MB/s of read and writting, so any SSD cappable of that speeds will do (there's no need for one with 550MB/s on both, which might be more expensive).
    Btw, do a backup, do a clean install of Yosemite if you didn't and then migrate your data. That's much better than upgrading from Mavericks.
     
  4. RestUnknown thread starter macrumors regular

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    Aug 25, 2011
    #4
    Thanks for your answers.

    About this Mac says the protocol is Sata (there is no number behind it).
     
  5. snaky69 macrumors 603

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    Mar 14, 2008
    #5
    SATA I only on that vintage.
     
  6. RestUnknown thread starter macrumors regular

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    Aug 25, 2011
    #6
    And what does this mean? Will I still get a decent enough performance increase?
     
  7. Samuelsan2001 macrumors 604

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    Oct 24, 2013
    #7
    Yes

    Not in the league of the PCIe SSD's on the new rMBP's but a good boot time, 15-20 secs, and much faster opening apps. It'll also feel much more fluid and reponsive.

    However investing money in a 7 year old laptop can be a false economy at that age failure is quite often just round the corner. You could invest in an SSD that costs almost as much as the laptop is worth and then the logic board fails next week. Electronics wear out and you are reaching the end of your shelf life.

    I'm not saying don't do it just making your aware of the pitfalls...
     
  8. snaky69 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    #8
    SATA I, II, and III are speed standards for the SATA connection.

    1.5Gbps, 3Gbps and 6Gbps respectively. Those speeds are in gigaBITS per second, to get gigaBYTES you need to divide by 8.

    Your computer is old, it uses the SATA I standard. The theoretical maximum speed it can transfer data through the SATA port is 187,5MB/s. SATA II is double that and SATA III is quadruple that.

    In short, you will notice a difference, most definitely, but it won't be nearly as big as it'd be in a more recent computer that uses SATA II or III.
     
  9. arcite macrumors 6502a

    arcite

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2009
    Location:
    Cairo, trapped in a pyramid with my iphone
    #9
    I just put in a ssd in my 2010 macbook pro, well worth the money.... yet for a 2007 macbook? Your battery must be on its last legs. The architecture of the processor is pre-historic. Not to mention, your non-LED, non-retina screen must be getting pretty dim.

    IMO, best bet would be to sell it for what you can get for it ---before it completely dies, and put it toward a new machine. If you insist on keeping it going, put in the cheapest SSD possible. ;)
     
  10. snaky69 macrumors 603

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    Mar 14, 2008
    #10
    Just FYI, MBP's have have LED screens from the get go, back in '06.
     
  11. chanerz macrumors 6502a

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    Jul 7, 2010
  12. cltd macrumors member

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    May 22, 2014
    #12
    Add ram, if possible. I have MB Pro Penryn from 2007, maxed its ram to 6 GB and that killed beachball ;)

    For music, pdfs and surfing? Go for it. For other tasks CPU is showing its age. I put Sandisk 256 GB into my 8 years old MB Pro. BlackMagic says it's about 120 mb/s read speed, so slower than HDD 7200. But it's much snappier than bloody 5400 drive!
    I haven't noticed any boot time or battery life improvements.
    You can buy any cheap SSD, don't worry about specs because your Mac is so limited by SATA I. Only remember to get SSD with marvel driver.
     
  13. Asuriyan macrumors 6502a

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    Feb 4, 2013
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    Indiana
    #13
    The pre-unibody models were CCFL-backlit screens. Late 2008 was the first one to feature an LED-lit LCD.
     
  14. thadoggfather macrumors 604

    thadoggfather

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    Oct 1, 2007
    #14
  15. Asuriyan macrumors 6502a

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    Feb 4, 2013
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    Indiana
  16. snaky69 macrumors 603

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    Mar 14, 2008
    #16
    Doubt that as my 2008 pre-unibody machine is LED backlit.

    Guess I was beat to it.
     
  17. Samuelsan2001 macrumors 604

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    Oct 24, 2013
    #17
    Misunderstanding of SSD's

    Unless you are moving around big files sustained read/write speeds mean very little, it is very low I/O latency that is the real killer feature of SSD's...
     

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